Aurélie Garnier

Aurélie Garnier
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | SLU · Department of Aquatic Resources

PhD in Ecology

About

23
Publications
5,869
Reads
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423
Citations
Citations since 2016
22 Research Items
408 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction
I am interested in how multiple disturbances affect (aquatic) communities and whether we can predict their consequences at different levels of biological organisation. During my PhD, I did laboratory experiments with microbial communities. Then, a 1-yr post-doc, I used statistical tools to describe biotic and abiotic changes in the Baltic Sea. Now, I study the combined effects of light limitation, nutrient enrichment and fish presence on benthic and pelagic communities with mesocosm experiments
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - March 2020
University of Hamburg
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2013 - May 2018
University of Zurich
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • With microcosms experiments, I am testing: 1) the interactions between multiple environmental stressors, and their effects on all ecological levels. 2) the importance of the feedback biodiversity-environment on community stability.
January 2013 - June 2013
University of Zurich
Position
  • Intern
Description
  • The effects of temperature and nutrient enrichment on body size, population size and oxygen consumption
Education
August 2013 - May 2018
University of Zurich
Field of study
  • Ecology
September 2011 - June 2013
Université de Montpellier
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution
September 2009 - June 2011
Université de Montpellier
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
1.Laboratory microcosm experiments using protists as model organisms have a long tradition and are widely used to investigate general concepts in population biology, community ecology and evolutionary biology. Many variables of interest are measured in order to study processes and patterns at different spatiotemporal scales and across all levels of...
Article
Full-text available
The development of video-based monitoring methods allows for rapid, dynamic and accurate monitoring of individuals or communities, compared to slower traditional methods, with far reaching ecological and evolutionary applications. Large amounts of data are generated using video-based methods, which can be effectively processed using machine learnin...
Article
Full-text available
Global environmental change has negative impacts on ecological systems, impacting the stable provision of functions, goods and services. Whereas effects of individual environmental changes (e.g. temperature change or change in resource availability) are reasonably well understood, we lack information about if and how multiple changes interact. We e...
Article
Full-text available
Shallow coastal areas often have high productivity and diversity, in part due to the high availability of light and nutrients. At the same time, they are exposed to multiple environmental pressures, such as browning and eutrophication. Browning is mainly caused by runoff bringing coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM), reducing light availability...
Article
Ecological communities face a variety of environmental and anthropogenic stressors acting simultaneously. Stressor impacts can combine additively or can interact, causing synergistic or antagonistic effects. Our knowledge of when and how interactions arise is limited, as most models and experiments only consider the effect of a small number of non-...
Article
Full-text available
The temperature‐size rule (TSR) describes the inverse relationship between organism size and environmental temperature in uni‐ and multicellular species. Despite the TSR being widespread, the mechanisms for shrinking body size with warming remain elusive. Here, we experimentally test three hypotheses (differential development and growth [DDG], main...
Article
Full-text available
Theory predicts that organism–environment feedbacks play a central role in how ecological communities respond to environmental change. Strong feedback causes greater nonlinearity between environmental change and ecosystem state, increases the likelihood of hysteresis in response to environmental change, and augments the possibility of alternative s...
Preprint
Full-text available
The temperature-size rule (TSR) describes the inverse relationship between organism size and environmental temperature in uni- and multicellular species. Despite the TSR being widespread, the mechanisms for shrinking body size with warming remain elusive. Here, we experimentally test three hypotheses (differential development and growth [DDG], main...
Article
Full-text available
Losses and gains in species diversity affect ecological stability1–7 and the sustainability of ecosystem functions and services8–13. Experiments and models have revealed positive, negative and no effects of diversity on individual components of stability, such as temporal variability, resistance and resilience2,3,6,11,12,14. How these stability com...
Thesis
Full-text available
Freshwater ecosystems face increasing anthropogenic pressures despite their importance to provide goods and services to the human population. Therefore, being able to predict consequences of environmental disturbances on the individuals and populations in freshwater communities, and the ecosystem processes they underpin, is a primary challenge for...
Data
Scatterplot of trajectories in principal component space from videos of three experimental units (Tetra = Tetrahymena thermophila, none = control (no ciliates), and Loxo = Loxocephalus sp.). A 90% confidence interval ellipse is fitted to each of the three experimental units to identify background noise in component space. The observations that fall...
Data
Morphological boundaries for training data. (PDF)
Data
Sensitivity and specificity of alternative classifiers such as support vector machines (SVM) and Naive Bayes (NB), compared to random forest (RF) and manual classifiers. All provide similar classification success for the ciliate species. SVM and NB are even slightly better than RF in terms of classifying noise. (TIF)
Data
A single frame of one video, with particles labeled by their trajectory ID. For each trajectory, we obtained morphology and movement properties that were later used for classification into the respective species. (JPG)
Data
In each panel, a point is a trajectory, with its position on PC1 corresponding to overall size, and PC2 to variability in size, and turning behaviour. Trajectories from microcosms containing ciliates are shown in black, yellow dots are trajectories from the controls (no ciliates). Panel codes: Colp = Colpidium striatum, Dexio = Dexiostoma campylum,...
Data
Initial densities (individuals mL−1) for different richness treatments. (PDF)
Data
Scatterplot of trajectories in principal component space from videos of three experimental units. Trajectories reclassified as noise by the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) are outlined in black. In this example, only some of the trajectories from the Tetrahymena thermophila culture were classified as noise (i.e. are outlined in black and have their co...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Technological advances have greatly simplified to take and analyze digital images and videos, and ecologists increasingly use these techniques for trait, behavioral and taxonomic analyses. The development of techniques to automate biological measurements from the environment opens up new possibilities to infer species numbers, observe presence/a...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Biodiversity is both, a response variable affected by global change drivers and a factor modifying ecosystem processes and services that are essential to human well-being. Improved capability to predict the consequences of changes in drivers will aid improved prediction of the state of the environment. This project embarks on innovative avenues in this research domain by using a latitudinal gradient approach based on interactions, feedback and scale, which will yield more reliable and robust knowledge about global change processes. https://www.gcb.uzh.ch/en.html