Aura Raulo

Aura Raulo
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Zoology

About

19
Publications
1,830
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
185
Citations

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Members of the gut microbiota genus Bifidobacterium are widely distributed human and animal symbionts believed to exert beneficial effects on their hosts. However, in-depth genomic analyses of animal-associated species and strains are somewhat lacking, particularly in wild animal populations. Here, to examine patterns of host specificity and carboh...
Preprint
The mammalian gut microbiota influences a wide array of phenotypes and is considered a key determinant of fitness, yet knowledge about the transmission routes by which gut microbes colonise hosts in natural populations remains limited. Here, we use an intensively studied wild population of wood mice ( Apodemus sylvaticus ) to examine how vertical (...
Preprint
Viral discovery studies in wild animals often rely on cross-sectional surveys at a single time point. As a result, our understanding of the temporal stability of wild animal viromes remains poorly resolved. While studies of single host-virus systems indicate that host and environmental factors influence seasonal virus transmission dynamics, compara...
Preprint
Full-text available
Members of the gut microbiota genus Bifidobacterium are widely distributed human and animal symbionts believed to exert beneficial effects on their hosts. However, in-depth genomic analyses of animal-associated species and strains are somewhat lacking, particularly in wild animal populations. Here, to examine patterns of host specificity and carboh...
Article
Full-text available
The mammalian gut teems with microbes, yet how hosts acquire these symbionts remains poorly understood. Research in primates suggests that microbes can be picked up via social contact, but the role of social interactions in non-group-living species remains underexplored. Here, we use a passive tracking system to collect high resolution spatiotempor...
Preprint
Full-text available
The mammalian gut teems with beneficial microbes, yet how hosts acquire these symbionts remains poorly understood. Research in primates suggests that microbes can be picked up via social contact, but the role of social interactions in non-group-living species remains unexplored. Here, we use a passive tracking system to collect high resolution spat...
Article
Recent research in laboratory animals has illuminated how the vertebrate gut microbiome can have diverse and powerful effects on the brain and behaviour. However, the ecological relevance of this microbiome–gut–brain (MGB) axis outside the laboratory remains unexplored. Here we argue that understanding behavioural and cognitive effects of the gut m...
Article
Full-text available
Intact ecosystems are being lost or modified worldwide, and many animal species are now forced to live in altered landscapes. A large amount of scientific studies have focused on understanding direct effects of habitat alterations on species occurrence, abundance, breeding success, and other life history aspects. Much less attention has been placed...
Article
Full-text available
The causes and consequences of individual differences in animal behavior and stress physiology are increasingly studied in wild animals, yet the possibility that stress physiology underlies individual variation in social behavior has received less attention. In this review, we bring together these study areas and focus on understanding how the acti...
Article
Vertebrate gut microbiota form a key component of immunity and a dynamic link between an individual and the ecosystem. Microbiota might play a role in social systems as well, because microbes are transmitted during social contact and can affect host behaviour. Combining methods from behavioural and molecular research, we describe the relationship b...
Article
Full-text available
Despite essential progress towards understanding the evolution of cooperative behaviour, we still lack detailed knowledge about its underlying molecular mechanisms, genetic basis, evolutionary dynamics and ontogeny. An international workshop 'Genetics and Development of Cooperation', organized by the University of Bern (Switzerland), aimed at discu...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I'm using adehabitatHR package in R to estimate homeranges of wild mice from spatial point data. I'm estimating homerange overlap using kerneloverlap() function with method= "VI" , to weight the overlap with both individuals utilization distribution (UD). However, my study grid has edges and some hoe ranges are partially outside of the grid, making it impossible to reliably estimnate their area, but to some extent, I think I could still use them in the data, if the overlapping area between two homeranges is still within the grid. Does anyone know of a way of measuring edginess (e.g. proportion distribution near the edge) within the overlapping area of two UDs?

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)