August Ilg

August Ilg
University of Tuebingen | EKU Tübingen · Department of Geosciences

About

8
Publications
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Citations

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
It is known from present-day climates that both temporal and spatial variations in precipitation can be more pronounced than those in temperature and thus influence ecosystems and human society in more substantial way. However, very little is known about such variations in the past. Here we present an analysis of 206 palaeoprecipitation data from tw...
Article
Full-text available
We present two eight-million year long proxy records of precipitation for Southwest and Central Europe, covering the middle to late Miocene (5.3–13 Ma) at a temporal resolution of about 60 kyr and 150 kyr, respectively. The estimates of precipitation are based on the ecophysiological structure of herpetological assemblages (amphibians and reptiles)...
Article
Full-text available
Existing methods for determining paleoprecipitation are subject to large errors (؎350– 400 mm or more using mammalian proxies), or are restricted to wet climate systems due to their strong facies dependence (paleobotanical proxies). Here we describe a new paleo- precipitation tool based on an indexing of ecophysiological groups within herpetologica...
Data
Full-text available
Distributional and ecophysiologic data are obtained from the following references and databases: Balletto et al. 1985; Emms and Barnett 2005; Engelmann et al. 1993; Hussein and Darwish 2001; Kuzmin 1995; Raxworthy and Attuquayefio 2000; Rödel and Agyei 2002; Schleich et al. 1996; Spawls et al. 2002; Stuart 1999; China Species Information Service (C...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The late Miocene (11.6-11.4 Ma) Hammerschmiede locality (Allgäu, Bavaria, Germany) provides, besides hominid fossils (Danuvius guggenmosi), a spectacular diversity of vertebrates (fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals) comprising over 130 species. This project aims to describe this heritage in biodiversity from taxonomic and pelaeoecologic points of view.
Project
NECLIME is an open international network of scientists working on Cenozoic climate evolution and related changes of continental ecosystems. During the past 65 million years of Earth history, globally warmer-then-present conditions prevailed in a world with almost modern paleogeography. These timespans represent promising case studies for anticipated future scenarios. Within the NECLIME network, we aim to combine data on past climate change and its environmental impact for large-scale reconstructions. NECLIME research activities comprise paleoclimate reconstructions, including atmospheric CO₂ and ecosystem analysis using multiple quantitative methods on various primarily continental proxies (plants; vertebrates; invertebrates; geochemistry and geological proxies). Complementing model studies are employed to assess connections and processes driving ocean, atmosphere and biosphere at global and regional scales. NECLIME was established in 1999 with the aim to understand Neogene trends across Eurasia. This basic idea quickly and constantly expanded to a global interest and a wider stratigaphical frame. The steadily growing NECLIME network with currently around 140 members in 34 countries is coordinated by a team of researchers and an advisory board. NECLIME holds annual conferences and workshops and administers working groups bringing forward scientific exchange, joint projects, and the integration of research data. For more information go to www.neclime.de