Audrey Simon

Audrey Simon
Université de Montréal | UdeM

PhD

About

26
Publications
2,237
Reads
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237
Citations
Introduction
Audrey Simon currently works at Université de Montréal. Audrey does research in Veterinary Public Health and Epidemiology. Audrey's research focuses on wildlife diseases and public health in the Arctic. She is also involved in 'Qimuksiq: A Multidisciplinary Network on Dog Related Issues in the Canadian Arctic (Nunavik and Nunavut).' Audrey is the co-coordinator of the Observatoire multipartite québécois sur les zoonoses et l’adaptation aux changements climatiques, who's primary mission is to foster the collaboration of scientists and public policy makers working on issues at the animal-human-environment interface in the context of adaptation to climate change.

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Background In changing northern ecosystems, understanding the mechanisms of transmission of zoonotic pathogens, including the coccidian parasite Toxoplasma gondii , is essential to protect the health of vulnerable animals and humans. As high-level predators and scavengers, foxes represent a potentially sensitive indicator of the circulation of T. g...
Article
Full-text available
Following publication of the original article [1], the authors flagged the following to us: “On pages 3 and 5 of the PDF, the following can be seen: Sachs Harbour, and Ulukhaktok, NT, USA), Nunavut (Cambridge Bay, NU, USA) and the National Reference Centre for Parasitology (Montréal, QC, USA) for Inuit communities and the National Microbiology Labo...
Article
Full-text available
While dogs can have a positive impact on physical and mental health, they also represent a public health risk in terms of bites and zoonotic diseases. In the specific context of Inuit villages, the role, care, and value of dogs are culturally different than in southern Canada. Furthermore, rabies is endemic to the region. Dogs are frequently kept o...
Article
Rabies occurs throughout the Arctic, representing an ongoing public health concern for residents of northern communities. The Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) is the main reservoir of the Arctic rabies virus variant, yet little is known about the epidemiology of Arctic rabies, such as the ecological mechanisms driving where and when epizootics in fox po...
Article
Full-text available
Contexte : Les changements climatiques jouent un rôle important dans l’établissement et l’expansion géographiques des zoonoses. Il est donc essentiel de connaître les populations à risque de contracter ces maladies pour ensuite orienter les politiques et les pratiques en santé publique. Au Québec, 14 zoonoses ont été identifiées importantes pour la...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Climate change plays an important role in the geographic spread of zoonotic diseases. Knowing which populations are at risk of contracting these diseases is critical to informing public health policies and practices. In Québec, 14 zoonoses have been identified as important for public health to guide the climate change adaptation effor...
Article
Rabies is a major issue for human and animal health in the Arctic, yet little is known about its epidemiology. In particular, there is an ongoing debate regarding how Arctic rabies persists in its primary reservoir host, the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus), which exists in the ecosystem at very low population densities. To shed light on the mechanisms...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has been linked with the establishment and geographical expansion of zoonotic diseases, an example of which is the well-documented increase in human cases of Lyme disease in Quebec, Canada. As temperatures continue to increase in Quebec, it is anticipated that several zoonotic diseases will be affected. In response to the growing zoo...
Article
Full-text available
Dogs have been an integral part of the Inuit social and cultural environment for generations, but their presence also generates public health risks such as bites and exposure to zoonotic diseases such as rabies. In Nunavik, Canada, some prevention and control interventions targeting dogs have been implemented but have not demonstrated their effecti...
Technical Report
Au Québec comme dans le monde, les maladies transmises entre les animaux et les humains (zoonoses), qui représentent environ 60 % des maladies transmissibles à l’humain, sont en émergence. La dynamique complexe des zoonoses peut être influencée par les changements climatiques. Pour répondre à cette complexité, l’Observatoire multipartite québécois...
Poster
Full-text available
In Nunavik, the role of domestic dogs in harbouring and transmitting gastrointestinal parasites to people is poorly documented. The objectives of our study were to: 1) document spatio-temporal activity patterns of the Kuujjuaq dog population 2) measure the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in dogs 3) determine what factors influence parasiti...
Article
Full-text available
One Health has gained a remarkable profile in the animal and public health communities, in part owing to the pressing issues of emerging infectious diseases of wildlife origin. Wildlife parasitology can offer insights into One Health, and likewise One Health can provide justification to study and act on wildlife parasites. But how do we decide whic...
Article
Full-text available
Les approches ecosystemiques de la sante (AES) reconnaissent l’interdependance de la sante humaine et animale, de la sante des ecosystemes et de la societe. Dans cet article, nous nous pencherons particulierement sur la transdisciplinarite, l’un des six principes associes a ces approches. L’objectif general de cet article est d’explorer comment la...
Article
Full-text available
Rabies is endemic throughout arctic areas including the region of Nunavik, situated north of the 55th parallel of Québec, Canada, and raises public health concerns. The aim of this paper is to provide a descriptive overview of the temporal and regional distributions of three important components of arctic rabies in Nunavik from 1999 to 2012, follow...
Article
Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a zoonotic protozoan that sometimes causes serious illness in humans and other animals worldwide, including the Canadian Arctic. Wild and domestic felids, the only hosts able to shed T. gondii oocysts, are practically non-existent in the Canadian Arctic. So here the hypothesis that T. gondii oocysts, shed in the sou...
Article
Full-text available
Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic protozoan that causes serious illness in humans and infects animals worldwide, including the Canadian Arctic. Indeed, high prevalence of infection amongst Inuit has been recorded, possibly due to consumption of raw infected seal meat. Here we explore the hypothesis that T. gondii oocysts contaminate the coastal marin...
Article
Toxoplasma gondii, one of the more common zoonotic parasites in the world, can cause serious illness in humans and other animals worldwide. Felids are the only known host that can shed T. gondii oocysts, which are essential to the perpetuation of the parasite. In much of boreal Canada, the Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis) is the only wild felid host...
Article
Full-text available
Toxoplasmosis is a significant public health threat for Inuit in the Canadian Arctic. This study aimed to investigate arctic seals as a possible food-borne source of infection. Blood samples collected from 828 seals in 7 Canadian Arctic communities from 1999 to 2006 were tested for Toxoplasma gondii antibodies using a direct agglutination test. Pol...
Data
Toxoplasmosis is a significant public health threat for Inuit in the Canadian Arctic. This study aimed to investigate arctic seals as a possible food-borne source of infection. Blood samples collected from 828 seals in 7 Canadian Arctic communities from 1999 to 2006 were tested for Toxoplasma gondii antibodies using a direct agglutination test. Pol...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The main objective of this project is to assess and reduce human health threats related to the presence of dogs, while promoting a less threatening environment in communities where dogs can contribute to the quality of life and human well-being.
Project
CRSH Développement de partenariat / SSHRC Partnership Development, 2016-2019