Audrey Duarte

Audrey Duarte
Georgia Institute of Technology | GT · School of Psychology

PhD

About

72
Publications
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2,684
Citations

Publications

Publications (72)
Article
Successful memory performance depends on overlap between neural representations at encoding and retrieval. With older age, neural similarity, memory performance, and sleep quality decline. Regardless of age, racial/ethnic minorities tend to experience poor sleep, which may contribute to poor memory. Previous studies have not investigated memory per...
Article
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Previous studies have attempted to separate single trial neural responses for events a person is likely to remember from those they are likely to forget using machine learning classification methods. Successful single trial classification holds potential for translation into the clinical realm for real-time detection of memory and other cognitive s...
Article
Episodic memory deficits have increasingly been recognized as a cognitive feature of depression. To quantify these deficits and determine how they are moderated by various tasks (e.g., stimulus valence) and participant (e.g., age, depression diagnosis) variables, we conducted a three-level meta-analysis on 995 effect sizes derived from 205 studies...
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Research on memory in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) finds increased difficulty encoding contextual associations in episodic memory and suggests executive dysfunction (e.g., selective attention, cognitive flexibility) and deficient metacognitive monitoring as potential contributing factors. Findings from our lab suggest that age-related impairments...
Article
Better sleep quality has been associated with better episodic memory performance in young adults. However, the strength of sleep-memory associations in aging has not been well characterized. It is also unknown whether factors such as sleep measurement method (e.g., polysomnography, actigraphy, self-report), sleep parameters (e.g., slow wave sleep,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research on memory in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) finds increased difficulty encoding contextual associations in episodic memory and suggests executive dysfunction and deficient metacognitive monitoring as potential contributing factors. Using an aging framework, we tested the effects of selective attention on context memory in ASD. We evaluated...
Article
Episodic memories are multidimensional, including simple and complex features. How we successful encode and recover these features in time, whether these temporal dynamics are preserved across age, even under conditions of reduced memory performance, and the role of attention on these temporal dynamics is unknown. In the current study, we applied t...
Article
Some prior research has found that older adults are more susceptible to proactive interference than young adults. The current study investigated if age-related deficits in pFC-mediated cognitive control processes that act to detect and resolve interference underlie increased susceptibility to proactive interference in an associative memory task. Yo...
Article
Cambridge Core - Cognition - The Cambridge Handbook of Cognitive Aging - edited by Ayanna K. Thomas
Article
Top-down modulation underlies our ability to focus attention on task-relevant stimuli and ignore irrelevant distractions. Although age-related differences in neural correlates of top-down modulation have been investigated in multiple studies using variety of tasks (Gazzaley et al., 2005; Störmer et al., 2013), the effect of age on top-down modulati...
Article
The vast majority of what is known about the neural underpinnings of human cognition comes from studies limited to racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically homogeneous samples. Furthermore, although most studies include both males and females in their samples, sex differences in patterns of brain activity and performance are rarely evaluated. We...
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Variation in human brains creates difficulty in implementing electroencephalography into universal brain–machine interfaces. Conventional electroencephalography systems typically suffer from motion artefacts, extensive preparation time and bulky equipment, while existing electroencephalography classification methods require training on a per-subjec...
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Previous studies have only investigated age-related differences in emotional processing and encoding in response to, not in anticipation of, emotional stimuli. In the current study, we investigated age-related differences in the impact of emotional anticipation on affective responses and episodic memory for emotional images. Young and older adults...
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The current "one size fits all" approach to our cognitive aging population is not adequate to close the gap between cognitive health span and lifespan. In this review article, we present a novel model for understanding, preventing, and treating age-related cognitive impairment (ARCI) based on concepts borrowed from precision medicine. We will discu...
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There is a strong relationship between sleep and memory for the details of past events. In old age, both episodic memory performance and related neural activity decline. These changes occur in parallel to age-related decreases in sleep quality. Thus, poor sleep quality may be an explanatory factor for poor memory in older adulthood. Furthermore, Bl...
Article
Previous research on age-related associative memory deficits has generally focused on memory for single associations. However, our real-world experiences contain a multitude of details that must be effectively integrated and encoded into coherent representations to facilitate subsequent retrieval of the event as a whole. How aging interferes with t...
Article
In Figure 3b of the originally published article, the colours of the bars were incorrectly reversed. The bars shown in green should have been shown in blue to represent the findings from older adults, whereas the bars shown in blue should have been shown in green to represent the findings from young adults. This has been corrected in the HTML and P...
Article
Cognitive ageing research examines the cognitive abilities that are preserved and/or those that decline with advanced age. There is great individual variability in cognitive ageing trajectories. Some older adults show little decline in cognitive ability compared with young adults and are thus termed ‘optimally ageing’. By contrast, others exhibit s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Age-related differences in processing emotional stimuli are well established. However, previous studies have only assessed the impact of age on emotional processing and encoding in response to, not in anticipation of, emotional stimuli. In the current study, we investigated age-related differences in the impact of emotional anticipation on affectiv...
Preprint
Full-text available
Healthy aging is associated with declines in episodic memory performance that are due in part to deficits in encoding. Emerging results from young adult studies suggest that the neural activity during the time-period preceding stimulus presentation is sensitive to episodic memory performance. It is unknown whether age-related declines in episodic m...
Article
Objectives: Declines in both short- and long-term memory are typical of healthy aging. Recent findings suggest that retrodictive attentional cues ("retro-cues") that indicate the location of to-be-probed items in short-term memory (STM) have a lasting impact on long-term memory (LTM) performance in young adults. Whether older adults can also use r...
Preprint
Declines in both short and long-term memory are typical of healthy aging. Recent findings suggest that retrospective attentional cues ("retro-cues") that indicate the location of to-be-probed items enhance both short (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) performance in young adults. Whether older adults can also use retro-cues to facilitate both STM and...
Article
Stress during consolidation improves recognition memory performance. Generally, this memory benefit is greater for emotionally arousing stimuli than neutral stimuli. The strength of the stressor also plays a role in memory performance, with memory performance improving up to a moderate level of stress and thereafter worsening. As our daily stressor...
Article
Recent evidence suggests that directing attention toward single item-context associations during encoding improves young and older adults' context memory performance and reduces demands on executive functions during retrieval. In everyday situations, there are many event features competing for our attention, and our ability to successfully recover...
Article
Published online xxx Keywords: Self-reference effect Source memory Alzheimer's disease Behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia Voxel-based morphometry a b s t r a c t Encoding information in reference to the self enhances subsequent memory for the source of this information. In healthy adults, self-referential processing has been proposed to be...
Article
Published online xxx Keywords: Self-reference effect Source memory Alzheimer's disease Behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia Voxel-based morphometry a b s t r a c t Encoding information in reference to the self enhances subsequent memory for the source of this information. In healthy adults, self-referential processing has been proposed to be...
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Full-text available
Previous event-related potential (ERP) and neuroimaging evidence suggests that directing attention toward single item-context associations compared to intra-item features at encoding improves context memory performance and reduces demands on strategic retrieval operations in young and older adults. In everyday situations, however, there are multipl...
Article
Behavioral research has shown that spatial cues that orient attention toward task relevant items being maintained in visual short-term memory (VSTM) enhance item memory accuracy. However, it is unknown if these retrospective attentional cues ("retro-cues") enhance memory beyond typical short-term memory delays. It is also unknown whether retro-cues...
Article
Behavioral evidence has shown age-related impairments in overcoming proactive interference in memory, but it is unclear what underlies this deficit. Imaging studies in the young suggest overcoming interference may require several executive control processes supported by the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC). The p...
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Full-text available
Research with younger adults has shown that retrospective cues can be used to orient top-down attention toward relevant items in working memory. We examined whether older adults could take advantage of these cues to improve memory performance. Younger and older adults were presented with visual arrays of five colored shapes; during maintenance, par...
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Whether we are explicitly listening to it or not, music is prevalent in our environment. Surprisingly, little is known about the effect of environmental music on concurrent cognitive functioning and whether young and older adults are differentially affected by music. Here, we investigated the impact of background music on a concurrent paired associ...
Article
Processing information in relation to the self enhances subsequent item recognition in both young and older adults and further enhances recollection at least in the young. Because older adults experience recollection memory deficits, it is unknown whether self-referencing improves recollection in older adults. We examined recollection benefits from...
Article
Age-related source memory impairments may be due, at least in part, to deficits in executive processes mediated by the pFC at both study and test. Behavioral work suggests that providing environmental support at encoding, such as directing attention toward item-source associations, may improve source memory and reduce age-related deficits in the re...
Article
Behavioral evidence suggests that young and older adults show a benefit in source memory accuracy when processing materials in reference to the self. In the young, activity within the medial prefrontal cortex supports this source memory benefit at study. In this investigation, we examined whether the same neural regions support this memory benefit...
Article
Behavioral evidence from the young suggests spatial cues that orient attention toward task-relevant items in visual working memory (VWM) enhance memory capacity. Whether older adults can also use retrospective cues ("retro-cues") to enhance VWM capacity is unknown. In the current event-related potential (ERP) study, young and old adults performed a...
Article
Neuroimaging evidence suggests that older adults exhibit deficits in frontally-mediated strategic retrieval processes, such as post-retrieval monitoring. Behavioral research suggests that explicitly directing attention toward source features during encoding may improve source memory for both young and older adults and alleviate age-related source m...
Article
Memory loss resulting from damage to the medial temporal lobes (MTL) is traditionally considered to reflect damage to a dedicated, exclusive memory system. Recent work, however, has suggested that damage to one MTL structure, the perirhinal cortex (PRC), compromises complex object representations that are necessary for both memory and perception. T...
Article
Many behavioral studies have shown that memory is enhanced for emotionally salient events across the lifespan. It has been suggested that this mnemonic boost may be observed for both age groups, particularly the old, in part because emotional information is retrieved with less effort than neutral information. Neuroimaging evidence suggests that ine...
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Full-text available
Previous behavioral evidence suggests that instructed strategy use benefits associative memory formation in paired associate tasks. Two such effective encoding strategies--visual imagery and sentence generation--facilitate memory through the production of different types of mediators (e.g., mental images and sentences). Neuroimaging evidence sugges...
Article
Previous behavioral work suggests that processing information in relation to the self enhances subsequent item recognition. Neuroimaging evidence further suggests that regions along the cortical midline, particularly those of the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), underlie this benefit. There has been little work to date, however, on the effects of se...
Article
Age-related declines in source memory have been observed for various stimuli and associated details. These impairments may be related to alterations in brain regions contributing to source memory via material-independent processes and/or regions specialized for processing specific materials. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging...
Article
Previous behavioral research suggests that older adults exhibit impairments in source memory across a multitude of stimuli and associated details, possibly due to a deficit in contextual binding. However, it is unclear whether this binding deficit results from alterations in processes that are material-independent, processes that are specific to pa...
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Full-text available
It has been suggested that several regions of the brain, including subregions of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and the posterior parietal cortex, contribute to source memory success in a material-general manner, with most models highlighting the importance of memory process rather than material type. For the MTL in particular, however, increasing...
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Lesion and neuroimaging studies suggest that orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) supports temporal aspects of episodic memory. However, it is unclear whether OFC contributes to the encoding and/or retrieval of temporal context and whether it is selective for temporal relative to nontemporal (spatial) context memory. We addressed this issue with two complim...
Article
Although early studies on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) focused on memory dysfunction; more recent studies suggest that MCI is clinically heterogeneous. The objective of this study is to examine patterns of cerebral perfusion in anmestic (N=12) and nonamnestic (N=12) single-domain MCI patients from 4 a priori regions of interest: middle and super...
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Older adults often exhibit elevated false recognition for events that never occurred, while simultaneously experiencing difficulty in recognizing events that actually occurred. It has been proposed that reduced recollection in conjunction with an over-reliance on familiarity may contribute to this pattern of results. This explanation is somewhat in...
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Full-text available
High-functioning older adults can exhibit normal recollection when measured subjectively, via "remember" judgments, but not when measured objectively, via source judgments, whereas low-functioning older adults exhibit impairments for both measures. A potential explanation for this is that typical subjective and objective tests of recollection neces...
Article
In Alzheimer's disease (AD), atrophy negatively impacts cognition while in healthy adults, inverse relationships between brain volume and cognition may occur. We investigated correlations between gray matter volume and cognition in elderly controls, AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with memory and executive deficits. AD demonstrated...
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http://download.journals.elsevierhealth.com/pdfs/journals/1552-5260/PIIS1552526006035825.pdf
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We developed a new flexible approach for a co-analysis of multi-modal brain imaging data using a non-parametric framework. In this approach, results from separate analyses on different modalities are combined using a combining function and assessed with a permutation test. This approach identifies several cross-modality relationships, such as conco...
Article
Numerous behavioral studies have suggested that normal aging has deleterious effects on episodic memory and that recollection is disproportionately impaired relative to familiarity-based recognition. However, there is a wide degree of variability in memory performance within the aging population and this generalization may not apply to all elderly...
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Full-text available
Recognition memory can be supported by both the assessment of the familiarity of an item and by recollection of the context in which an item was encountered. Some have hypothesized that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) disproportionately contributes to recollection, whereas an alternative view is that the PFC contributes to both recollection and familia...
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Full-text available
Single-unit, event-related potential (ERP), and neuroimaging studies have implicated the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in top-down control of attention and working memory. We conducted an experiment in patients with unilateral PFC damage (n = 8) to assess the temporal kinetics of PFC-extrastriate interactions during visual attention. Subjects alternated...
Article
Results from behavioral studies have supported the idea that recognition memory can be supported by at least two different processes, recollection and familiarity. However, it remains unclear whether these two forms of memory reflect neurally distinct processes. Furthermore, it is unclear whether recollection and familiarity can be best conceived a...

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Projects (11)
Archived project
To investigate the effect of top-down attention on perception and working memory