Audrey Anton

Audrey Anton
Western Kentucky University | WKU · Department of Political Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
3,345
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16
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
14 Citations
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Introduction
My areas of research include Ancient Philosophy, Ethics, Moral Psychology, and Philosophical Gerontology. I am currently working on a manuscript for a book-length treatment of Aristotle's theory of Vice.

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Aristotle maintains that vicious people are blameworthy despite their moral ignorance, since becoming vicious was up to them (eph’ hemin) and whatever is up to us we are able to do or not do. However, one’s upbringing shapes one’s moral character. Together, these claims invite an objection I call the horrible childhood challenge. According to this...
Chapter
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It is widely accepted that, for Aristotle, no person can achieve eudaimonia absent a polis. In this paper, I argue that for a stronger claim: absent a well-functioning polis, no person can avoid vice or worse (i.e., they may become brutish). Through attention to the late advent of reason in childhood development and the challenges to acquiring mora...
Chapter
Full-text available
Since the advent of Harry Frankfurt's notion of the willing addict, philosophers have reconsidered our notions of control and volition in free action. In this paper, I consider conditions for free action in light of an additional addict: the willingly dry addict. The willingly dry addict has a history of unwilling addiction but has her addiction un...
Article
Full-text available
I argue that the two criteria traditionally identified as jointly sufficient for voluntary behavior according to Aristotle require qualification. Without such qualification, they admit troubling exceptions (i.e., they are not sufficient). Through minding these difficult examples, I conclude that a third condition mentioned by Aristotle – the eph' h...
Article
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There seems to be tension between portrayals of Socrates as both a committed philosopher and a pious man. For instance, one might doubt Socrates’ commitment to philosophy since he seems to irrationally defer to a daimonion . On the other hand, the fact that he challenges messages from Oracles ( Apology 21–22) and the gods’ role concerning the origi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Anton suggests that we are obligated to work as long as it takes to secure financial solvency in the reasonably foreseeable future (provided that we are able, which depends on both our ability to work and our ability to save). She acknowledges that our ability to save might be compromised by economic hardship as well as our obligation to contribute...
Chapter
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Anton argues that, for the Classical philosophers, the quality and meaning of old age supervenes on the wisdom and moral character of the individual. Any apparent disagreements between these philosophers can be traced back to differences in metaphysical, epistemological, and moral doctrines. For instance, Plato suggests that old age is freedom from...
Book
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This book challenges a basic assumption held by many responsibility theorists: that agents must be morally responsible in the retrospective sense for anything in virtue of which they deserve praise or blame (the primacy assumption). Anton sets out to defeat this assumption by showing that accepting it as well as the much more intuitive causality as...
Chapter
Full-text available
Ethics is demanding by nature, telling us what we should or should not do. But one ethical theory in particular, utilitarianism, is more demanding than most, and is often criticized as requiring too much of us. Neither utilitarianism nor deontology requires Superman to care about truth, justice, or the American way. It might not be possible for Sup...
Article
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The infantilization of older adults seems morally deplorable whereas very young children are appropriate recipients of such treatment. Children, we argue, are not mentally capable of acting autonomously and reasoning clearly. However, we have difficulty reconciling this justification with the fact that many of the elders whom we respect are mentall...
Article
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Article
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