Atsuko Saito

Atsuko Saito
Sophia · Department of Psychology

Dr.

About

62
Publications
13,585
Reads
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650
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2018 - present
Sophia University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
April 2015 - March 2018
Musashino University
Position
  • Lecturer
November 2011 - March 2015
The University of Tokyo
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (62)
Article
Full-text available
Humans communicate with each other through language, which enables us talk about things beyond time and space. Do non-human animals learn to associate human speech with specific objects in everyday life? We examined whether cats matched familiar cats’ names and faces (Exp.1) and human family members’ names and faces (Exp.2). Cats were presented wit...
Article
A number of studies have reported diminished attention to the eyes in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These studies predominantly used static images of faces as stimuli. Recent studies, however, have shown enhanced response to eye contact in typically developing (TD) individuals when they observe a person in a live interaction. We...
Article
Full-text available
Many animals probably hold mental representations about the whereabouts of others; this is a form of socio-spatial cognition. We tested whether cats mentally map the spatial position of their owner or a familiar cat to the source of the owner’s or familiar cat’s vocalization. In Experiment 1, we placed one speaker outside a familiar room (speaker 1...
Article
Full-text available
Persistence of a distant goal is an important personality trait that determines academic and social success. Recent studies have shown that individual differences in persistence involve both genetic and environmental factors; however, these studies have not examined the role of maternal factors on a young children's persistence. The present study e...
Article
In humans, support from partners and alloparents is crucial for successful child-rearing and optimal child development. However, the complex relationships among childcare support, children's outcomes and parental characteristics have not been fully examined. We investigate how three sources of partner and alloparental support—partner's childcare pa...
Poster
Objective: A variety of support from others is crucial for child-rearing in humans. It can be predicted that childcare support will improve both children’s and parents’ outcomes, but the pathways behind the associations have not been sufficiently examined. This study investigates the associations among (1) childcare support (partner’s childcare par...
Article
Full-text available
Dogs and cats are sensitive to human social signals such as pointing, gazing and facial expressions. Previous studies have demonstrated that dogs show over-reliance on human actions in the presence of conflicting physical cues. However, it is still unclear whether this tendency is specific to dogs, or shared with other domesticated animals. Here, w...
Poster
Objective: Adolescence, a period of transition from childhood to adulthood, is a significant life stage under life history theory. The socio-ecological environment of adolescence likely influences developmental trajectory/later health, but current evolutionary research focuses on adult-defined Western concepts of environmental quality. An ethologic...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
We examined whether cats have a cross-modal representation of humans, using a cross-modal expectancy violation paradigm originally used with dogs by Adachi et al. (Anim Cogn 10:17–21, 2007). We compared cats living in houses and in cat cafés to assess the potential effect of postnatal experience. Cats were presented with the face of either their ow...
Article
Full-text available
Two of the most common nonhuman animals that interact with humans are domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and cats (Felis catus). In contrast to dogs, the ability of domestic cats to communicate with humans has not been explored thoroughly. We used a habituation-dishabituation method to investigate whether domestic cats could discriminate human uttera...
Article
Full-text available
Protanomalous females with X chromosome-linked color vision deficiency exhibit mild abnormalities, whereas dichromats show a distinct deficiency in discriminating certain color pairs. Dichromats have an advantage in detecting a textured target when it is camouflaged by red-green colors, owing to their insensitivity to these colors. However, it is n...
Chapter
Common marmosets are small primates. This chapter introduces some of the neuroendocrinological research that has been conducted concerning parental behavior in marmosets. It discusses the general merits of common marmosets as an animal model. The chapter presents the merits of using common marmosets to study parenting behavior. The division of care...
Article
Full-text available
Nobody would dispute that cats and dogs are the two most popular species of companion animals for humans. It is no wonder that dogs are often considered to be the best friends and adopted family members of human beings: They developed the high social ability to communicate with humans during the two species' long history of co-habitation. However,...
Article
Full-text available
The Social Value Orientation (SVO) explains individual differences in cooperation attitudes. In this study, we examine whether the SVO affects the time taken, and amount of information gathered, when judging the trustworthiness of other people. Participants were able to choose a partner based on the past allocation patterns of candidates, mimicking...
Article
Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulties with social interaction and communication. First-hand accounts written by individuals with ASD have shown the existence of other atypical characteristics such as difficulties with body awareness. However, few studies have examined whether such atypicalities are found more generally a...
Article
We examined whether cats could retrieve and utilize incidentally encoded information from a single past event in a simple food-exploration task previously used for dogs (Fujita et al., 2012). In Experiment 1, cats were led to four open, baited containers and allowed to eat from two of them (Exposure phase). After a 15-min delay during which the cat...
Article
Motivation in doing a task is influenced not only by the expected outcome of the task but also by the belief that one has in successfully executing the task. Over time, individuals accumulate experiences that contribute toward a general belief in one's overall ability to successfully perform tasks, which is called general self-efficacy (GSE). We in...
Article
Full-text available
Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have developed a close relationship with humans through the process of domestication. In human-dog interactions, eye contact is a key element of relationship initiation and maintenance. Previous studies have suggested that canine ability to produce human-directed communicative signals is influenced by domestication...
Data
Results of the GLMs showing the effect of each explanatory variable (i.e., breed group [Primitive, Hunting/Herding, Molossoid], sex, and age) on dog’s communicative behaviors. Breed group are categorized according to Passalacqua et al. [29]. Significant results (p < 0.05) are shown in bold. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Maintaining an appropriate distance from others is important for establishing effective communication and good interpersonal relations. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder associated with social difficulties, and it is thus worth examining whether individuals with ASD maintain typical or atypical degrees of social distance. A...
Data
The anonymized dataset used in the main analyses. (XLSX)
Article
We tested whether cats (Felis catus) could recognize human attentional states when begging for food from one of two unfamiliar actors. Cats were tested under three conditions that differed in the actors’ actions: Visual only condition—the actor looking at the cat silently versus facing sideways silently; Visual and Auditory condition—the actor look...
Article
Polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) have been hypothesized to correlate with social behavior in humans and other mammals. We examined the relationships between owner-assessed personality and OXTR polymorphisms in cats, which have long history of domestication by humans. We analyzed the exon1 region of OXTR in 94 DNA samples (57 males...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have engaged in unique cooperative breeding insofar as multiple in-group members help mothers. Two psychological-proximate factors maintain such a breeding system-various individuals' interest in infants and mothers' positive reactions toward individuals approaching their infants-which we investigated in the present study. In Study 1, we con...
Article
Parental behavior is important for the development of mammalian offspring. Research on the mechanisms underlying parental behavior, however, has been largely restricted to rodent models. As a consequence, although research on parent–infant relationships has been conducted using macaque monkeys for more than half a century, little is known about the...
Article
Full-text available
On the basis of observational and experimental evidence, several authors have proposed that contagious yawn is linked to our capacity for empathy, thus presenting a powerful tool to explore the root of empathy in animal evolution. The evidence for the occurrence of contagious yawning and its link to empathy, however, is meagre outside primates and...
Article
Full-text available
The neuropeptide oxytocin plays a central role in prosocial and parental behavior in non-human mammals as well as humans. It has been suggested that oxytocin may affect visual processing of infant faces and emotional reaction to infants. Healthy male volunteers (N = 13) were tested for their ability to detect infant or adult faces among adult or in...
Article
Domestic cats have had a 10,000-year history of cohabitation with humans and seem to have the ability to communicate with humans. However, this has not been widely examined. We studied 20 domestic cats to investigate whether they could recognize their owners by using voices that called out the subjects' names, with a habituation-dishabituation meth...
Article
Parental care is necessary for infant mammals to survive because they are born immaturely. In rodents, the retrieval of pups has been used to evaluate the motivation for maternal behaviour. Common marmosets are cooperative breeders and their parental or alloparental behaviour has been evaluated on the basis of the frequency of carrying infants in a...
Article
Parent-offspring attachment is important for animals which have offspring that require parental care for their development. Infant attachment to the mother has been examined in macaques, but it remains poorly understood in common marmosets. Here, we examined the abilities of 14 common marmoset infants to show preference for their parents over adult...
Article
Oxytocin facilitates social recognition in rats and mice, onset of maternal behavior in virgin mice and formation of pair bonds without copulation in prairie voles. However, the relationship between this peptide and paternal behavior in primates remains largely unknown. We investigated whether oxytocin affects paternal behavior in common marmosets....
Article
Although paternal behavior is rare in mammals including primates, males take an active role in rearing infants among callitrichid species. The repertoire of male-infant interactions observed in these species is similar to that observed in humans, such as carrying, protecting, food sharing, grooming, playing, and proximity. Callitrichid species coul...
Article
Compared with dogs (Canis familiaris), the social cognitive abilities of cats (Felis catus) have not received much research attention, probably because cats are not considered to be as social as dogs. However, cats have in fact developed sociality in conspecifics and, needless to say, cat-human relationships after their domestication. This paper in...
Article
Food transfer is considered to provide infants with additional nutrients during weaning, and in fact, its frequency peaks around this time. However, the mechanisms underlying such food transfer remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) change their tolerance to offspring begging for food depe...
Article
This study investigated whether 12 participants with color-vision deficiency had superior visual discrimination of color-camouflaged stimuli shown on a computer screen compared with 12 participants with normal trichromatic vision. Participants were asked to distinguish a circular pattern from other patterns in which textural elements differed from...
Article
Due to a middle- to long-wavelength-sensitive (M/LWS) cone opsin polymorphism, there is considerable phenotypic variation in the color vision of New World monkeys. Many females have trichromatic vision, whereas some females and all males have dichromatic vision. The selective pressures that maintain this polymorphism are unclear. In the present stu...
Article
Color-vision polymorphism in New World monkeys occurs because of an allelic polymorphism of the single-copy red-green middle-to-long-wavelength-sensitive (M/LWS) opsin gene on the X chromosome. Because color-vision types can readily be estimated from allelic types of the M/LWS opsin gene, this polymorphic system offers researchers an excellent oppo...
Article
We determined the structures of long (L)-wavelength-sensitive and middle (M)-wavelength-sensitive opsin gene array of 58 male chimpanzees and we investigated relative sensitivity to red and green lights by electroretinogram flicker photometry. One subject had protanomalous color vision, while others had normal color vision. Unlike in humans, a poly...
Article
Although color vision deficiency is very rare among Old World monkeys and apes, one male chimpanzee (Lucky) was identified as protanomalous by genetic and physiological analyses. This study assessed behavioral phenotypes of Lucky and four chimpanzees with normal color vision by discrimination task using the modified Ishihara pseudo-isochromatic pla...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The social environment around us during our formative teenage years can have life-long implications for health and behaviour - but how this happens may be different between cultures. In this project, we are establishing a long-term collaboration on adolescent sociality in Japan and the UK, with particular focus on adolescent social networks and adolescent communication. (Co-PIs: Emily Emmott and Masahito Morita) https://www.adolescentsociality.com