Astrid E. J. Ogilvie

Astrid E. J. Ogilvie
University of Colorado Boulder | CUB

About

81
Publications
16,577
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2,469
Citations
Citations since 2017
25 Research Items
928 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250

Publications

Publications (81)
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter asks what insights long-term historical information from before the Great Acceleration and Anthropocene might offer to policy and practice in the twenty-first century. Conventional sustainability research usually focuses on shallower time horizons that could miss insightful environmental and social processes evolving over centuries to...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we examine the iconic disappearance of the Medieval Norse Greenlanders and use qualitative scenarios and counterfactual analysis to produce lessons for policymakers. We stress the role that archaeologists and historians have in adding context to contemporary social and environmental challenges and use human-environmental histories...
Chapter
This chapter draws upon ongoing work on the past sea-ice record for Iceland, as well as research on sea-ice records for the Labrador Sea and considerations of current issues of sea-ice impacts in Labrador/Nunatsiavut. It presents sea-ice variations from ca. 1815 to the present and the role of sea ice as experienced by two Arctic/Subarctic populatio...
Chapter
In this chapter the authors analyse the oldest long-term meteorological observational data from Greenland. This was undertaken by Christopher Brasen in Neu-Herrnhut, Greenland, under the patronage of Christian Gottlieb Kratzenstein. The observations, published in part in Cranz’s work, as well as in manuscript form, may be some of the oldest ongoing...
Chapter
Community engagement in the research process is more than communication and outreach. It is a process of co-production of knowledge. The co-production of knowledge starts and ends at the “small” local level but is embedded in “big” processes that are nested in academic and research institution priorities. This chapter problematizes the issues of sm...
Chapter
The NordForsk Centre of Excellence-funded project Arctic Climate Predictions: Pathways to Resilient, Sustainable Societies has as its acronym “ARCPATH” which reflects its focus on the Arctic region and the NordForsk focus on “pathways to sustainability”. ARCPATH is a ground-breaking project designed specifically to synthesize results derived from a...
Chapter
Large-scale, long-term, international, interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, multi–topic research projects with many different country, university and non-academic partners are increasingly the norm, particularly in areas of global significance such as climate change and biodiversity loss. Such complex projects present new challenges, such as the n...
Book
Full-text available
This volume investigates environmental and political crises that occurred in Europe during the late Middle Ages and the early Modern Period, and considers their effects on people’s lives. At this time, the fragile human existence was imagined as a ‘Dance of Death’, where anyone, regardless of social status or age, could perish unexpectedly. This bo...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Mývatn area in northeast Iceland has been occupied by farming communities since the arrival of Viking Age settlers in the late ninth century. Despite its inland location and relatively high elevation, this lake basin was affected by continuous human occupation through periods of harsh climate, volcanic eruptions, epidemics, and world system imp...
Article
Full-text available
In the general seismological literature, there is scant information regarding historical earthquakes in Greenland and Labrador. This paper seeks to redress this by focusing on earthquakes during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries (to the early 1870s) in western Greenland and Labrador, regions bordering Davis Strait. The information is drawn pr...
Article
Durant l’année 1783, un grand brouillard sec enveloppa l’Hémisphère Nord pendant plusieurs mois. A l’origine de celui-ci, l’éruption volcanique du Lakagígar en Islande qui débuta le 8 juin 1783. La nouvelle de cette éruption ne fut connue à Copenhague qu’au 1er septembre 1783 ; elle fut ensuite répercutée, dans le reste de l’Europe, par le courrier...
Conference Paper
This presentation focuses on the Mývatn district in northeastern Iceland. It is a highland region and its principal feature is the lake for which it is named, and which contains several islands. The region is currently the topic of a funded international research project which considers sustainability and land management over several centuries. Res...
Article
Full-text available
This paper contributes to recent studies exploring the longue durée of human impacts on island landscapes, the impacts of climate and other environmental changes on human communities, and the interaction of human societies and their environments at different spatial and temporal scales. In particular, the paper addresses Iceland during the medieval...
Chapter
Because of its outstanding natural beauty and interesting geological features, the Mývatn area of Iceland, named for the lake which literally means “Midge Lake,” is regarded as one of Iceland's most valued natural treasures, and is an extremely popular tourist destination. Mývatn and its tributary river, the Laxa (meaning “salmon river”) were prote...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The intersecting tensions between Iceland's hay cultivation, livestock productivity, and climate have a long history as well as an influence on both political discourse and local knowledge production. In our study area, the Mývatn region, farmers ecologically restructured their upland, wetland landscape and surpassed perceived limitations on grass...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Floodplains have been the cradle of some of the earliest and richest civilizations in history. While most floodplain management systems tend to be near sea level, there is a unique system in the mountainous Lake Mývatn region in Iceland, the only community that has persisted in that elevation in Iceland since settlement c. 1100 years ago. These flo...
Presentation
Full-text available
This presentation focuses on human ecodynamics in the context of farming practices in the Myvatn area of northeastern Iceland. The research is highly interdisciplinary, and draws on approaches from the natural sciences, including climatology, biology, and geology, and also environmental humanities/social sciences in the fields of history, literary...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
It has been challenging to equate social and ecological resilience with vulnerability to climatic change in coupled human and natural systems over long time scales. This is also true for analysis of environmental disasters. To fully understand vulnerability of these systems, new approaches are needed to address these issues cultivating a more holis...
Article
Full-text available
[1] Satellite data suggest an Arctic sea ice–climate system in rapid transformation, yet its long-term natural modes of variability are poorly known. Here, we integrate and synthesize a set of multi-century historical records of Atlantic Arctic sea ice, supplemented with high-resolution paleo proxy records, each reflecting primarily winter/spring s...
Article
Full-text available
One of the few long instrumental records available for the Arctic is the Svalbard Airport composite series that hitherto began in 1911, with observations made on Spitsbergen, the largest island in the Svalbard Archipelago. This record has now been extended to 1898 with the inclusion of observations made by hunting and scientific expeditions. Temper...
Article
Full-text available
This paper draws upon a presentation given at the Sixth Open Assembly of the Northern Research Forum held in Hveragerði, Iceland in September 2011, discussing a comparison of different sea-ice records from Iceland and Labrador. In addition to an analysis of sea-­ice variations the project encompassed an evaluation of impacts of sea-ice changes on t...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, contacts between the Moravian Brethren of French-speaking Switzerland, the Moravian missionar-ies, and the Inuit Christian converts in Labrador are described. The role of the missionary journals, the annual collection of gifts for the missions, and, more specifi cally, the role of Jean-Louis Micheli, philanthropist and member of Egli...
Article
Full-text available
Historical climatology is the use of documentary evidence for the reconstruction of past climate. This paper gives a brief personal view of the development of the discipline from early times to the present day. Although several papers have been published on the importance of carefully analysing and evaluating all historical sources before they are...
Article
Full-text available
An important indicator of Holocene climate change is provided by evidence for variations in the extent of drift ice. A proxy for drift ice in Iceland waters is provided by the presence of quartz. Quantitative x-ray diffraction analysis of the < 2 mm sediment fraction was undertaken on 16 cores from around Iceland. The quartz weight (wt.)% estimates...
Article
Full-text available
Multidisciplinary approaches are used to examine possible changes in North Atlantic sea-ice cover, in the context of seal hunting, during the period of the Norse occupation of Greenland (ca. 985–1500). Information from Iceland is also used in order to amplify and illuminate the situation in Greenland. Data are drawn mainly from zooarchaeological an...
Article
Full-text available
The history of instrumental meteorological observations in Labrador/Nunatsiavut, Canada, began in August 1771 when the Unitas Fratrum, also known as the “Moravian Brethren”, established a mission among the Inuit on the Labrador coast. The Brethren named this place “Nain” after a city mentioned in the New Testament of the Bible. The missionaries inc...
Article
Full-text available
Human dimensions research focuses on the interrelationships between humans and the environment. To date, human dimensions research in arctic regions has concentrated primarily on local events and contexts. As such, it complements analysis elsewhere of adaptation and sustainable development within broad institutional, social, and environmental conte...
Article
Full-text available
Systematic temperature observations were not undertaken in Norway until the early 19th century, and even then only sporadically. Climate-proxy data may be used to reconstruct temperatures before this period, but until now there have not been any climate proxies available for late winter. This situation has recently changed, as a diary containing hi...
Article
Iceland is well-known for its rich literary tradition which includes a wealth of historical records containing accounts of climate and weather (Thoroddsen, 1916-17; Pórarinsson, 1956b; Bergpórsson, 1969a; Ogilvie, 1984, Ogilvie, 1991, 1992a; Ogilvie and Jónsson, 2001). In this paper, some of these sources will be described and evaluated and the inf...
Article
Full-text available
The development during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries of the sciences of meteorology and climatology and their subdisciplines has made possible an ever-increasing understanding of the climate of the past. In particular, the refinement of palaeoclimatic proxy data has meant that the climate of the past thousand years has begun to be extensiv...
Article
Environmental proxies of soil erosion on Iceland, and oceanographic conditions on the adjacent shelf, were measured on a 50 cm box core taken from the southwest Iceland shelf in 1993 during cruise 93030 of the Canadian ship, CSS Hudson. These data, covering the last several centuries, are compared with the documentary record of sea-ice changes arou...
Article
During the year 1783, a haze was spun out like a large veil over much of the Northern Hemisphere, persisting for periods of up to three months. In particular, the summer in Europe and elsewhere was characterized by the appearance of the phenomenon described by many contemporaries as the “great dry fog”. The origin of this was the Lakagígar volcanic...
Chapter
In 1979, the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia in Norwich held an international conference with the title “Climate and History”. This landmark meeting was one of the first of its kind to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplines to focus on the issues of past climates and variability as well as the impacts of clima...
Book
Most studies of the impacts of climate change consider impacts in the future from anthropogenic climate change. Very few consider what the impacts of past climate change have been. History and Climate: Memories of the Future? contains 13 interdisciplinary chapters which consider impacts of change in different regions of the world, over the last mil...
Article
Full-text available
The expansion and subsequent decline in catches in many fisheries of the world during the 20th century suggest that the history of fisheries needs our urgent attention. Analysis of environmental effects on fisheries in the past (when overfishing was not an issue) may cast light on current concerns about declining fish stocks. Primary documentary ev...
Article
The Late Maunder Minimum (LMM; 1675-1715) delineates a period with marked climate variability within the Little Ice Age in Europe. Gridded monthly mean surface pressure fields were reconstructed for this period for the eastern North Atlantic-European region (25°W-30°E and 35-70°N). These were based on continuous information drawn from proxy and ins...
Article
Full-text available
The loss of the Norse Western Settlement in Greenland around the mid fourteenth century has long been taken as a prime example of the impact of changing climate on human populations. This study employs an interdisciplinary approach combining historical documents, detailed archaeological investigations, and a high-resolution proxy climate record fro...
Article
Full-text available
Greenland, far north land of the Atlantic, has often been beyond the limit of European farming settlement. One of its Norse settlements, colonized just before AD 1000, is - astonishingly - not even at the southern tip, but a way up the west coast, the 'Western Settlement'. Environmental studies show why its occupation came to an end within five cen...
Chapter
Winter severity indices for Europe are compared and evaluated. New values are presented for the period 1220–1420 A.D. Overall, the data show long time scale cooling from c. 1200 to c. 1340, warming to c. 1510 and then cooling into the main Little Ice Age cold period of the 17th century.
Article
Winter severity indices for Europe are compared and evaluated. New values are presented for the period 1220-1420 A.D. Overall, the data show long time scale cooling from c.1200 to c.1340, warming to c.1510 and then cooling into the main Little Ice Age cold period of the 17th century. -Authors
Article
Presented in this report is a set of data used to reconstruct river discharge for ten U.K. drainage basins extending back into the nineteenth century. Also presented is a detailed compilation of documentary historical data which extends the records further back in time. (R.I.H.)
Article
A new reconstruction of the climate and sea-ice record for Iceland from medieval times to A.D. 1780 is presented, based on all available documentary sources. The importance of careful historical analysis to separate reliable from unreliable material is stressed, and these reconstructions are the first to have been produced using only reliable data....
Chapter
The people of Iceland have always relied on livestock, especially sheep, for food and other essential products. Animal husbandry was of particular importance in earlier times, when other resources, such as fish, were less readily available than they are today. The annual hay crop, needed to provide extra winter fodder, was vital to this type of far...
Article
Research into the climate of the Middle Ages has relied heavily upon data provided by compilations of references to weather and related phenomena extracted from a variety of historical texts and source documents. These compilations, produced from 1858 onwards, have generally neglected the essential need for source validation. While a considerable a...
Article
Full-text available
Iceland may be said to have become part of the Danish kingdom in 1536, although it was not formally subject to Danish laws until 1662. In 1904 the union with Denmark began to dissolve when home rule was granted, and since 1944 Iceland has been a self-governing republic. For the period ca. 1700 to 1894 a valuable historical legacy from Danish rule e...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
The project focused primarily on collecting data, historical documents and manuscripts on the patterns of landscape change in Mývatn; however, the collection was augmented by data from other regions in Iceland, in particular from adjacent communities. The results of this project have included the identification and collection of the largest data set on the use of vegetation resources for any area of Iceland, for a period of 250 years, specifically for AD 1700-1950, as well as new insights into the reasons for successes and failures in land management.