Astrid Haas

Astrid Haas
University of Central Lancashire | UCLAN · Institute for Black Atlantic Research

PhD
I currently research Black Inter-American mobilities and autobiography in the Age of Revolutions (1760-1860).

About

35
Publications
11,311
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17
Citations
Introduction
I am a Research Fellow at the Institute for Black Atlantic Research, University of Central Lancashire, UK. I earlier held research and teaching positions in North American Studies and Academic English at universities in Germany. My research focuses on travel writing, drama, and autobiography, the Black and Latinx Diasporas, Gender and Science Studies, and sports. I currently study how transnational Black autobiographies address Black mobilities in the Americas from 1760-1860.
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - February 2021
Bielefeld University
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Research and teaching in North American Literary and Cultural Studies; foci on African Diaspora Studies, Canadian and American Literature, and American Culture
September 2019 - present
University of Central Lancashire
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Research in North American, Inter-American, and Transatlantic Studies; major research project "Black Inter-American Mobility and Autobiography in the Age of Revolutions, 1760-1860"
December 2018 - August 2019
Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Taught English for Academic Purposes with a focus on academic writing; co-conceptualized and administered exams (UNICert II and III)
Education
January 2011 - February 2016
Bielefeld University
Field of study
  • North American Literary and Cultural Studies
April 2001 - April 2007
University of Münster
Field of study
  • English and American Studies
October 1994 - October 2000
University of Münster
Field of study
  • Art History

Publications

Publications (35)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The presentation deals with the ways Mahommah Baquaqua and his Interesting Narrative: Biography of Mahommah Gardo Baquaqua (1854) defy conventional notions of latinidad and Latin American literature, on the one hand, and of the genre of the black slave narrative of the Americas, on the other.
Book
Full-text available
Stages of Agency is the first monograph to analyse the specific contributions of American stage drama to the discourse on HIV/AIDS in the United States from the mid-1980s through the late 1990s. As the study shows, theater and drama played a unique role in educating the American public about AIDS, offering support for the sick and the grieving, and...
Article
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The text provides a theoretical and thematic introduction to the special issue of the American Studies Journal, entitled Transfrontera: Transnational Perspectives on the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands.
Article
Full-text available
The text provides a theoretical and thematic introduction to The Harlem Renaissance in an Inter-American Perspective. Ed. Astrid Haas. Special issue of FIAR: Forum for Inter-American Research 7.2 (2014): http://interamericaonline.org/volume-7-2/haas-1/
Chapter
Full-text available
The chapter investigates the narrative construction of Texas in three German travelogues writ-ten during the heyday of German migration to the region in the 1830s and 1840s. It claims that these and related texts contributed substantially to both the contemporary public debate about migration to Texas in Germany and the migratory practices of Germa...
Article
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The article studies African American narratives of indigenous captivity from its emergence in the mid-eighteenth century to the mid-nineteenth. Taking accounts by Briton Hammon, John Marrant, Henry Bibb, and James Beckwourth as examples, the essay charts the development of this body of writings, its distinction from white-authored narratives, and i...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
The conference “Black Mobilities in the Atlantic World” wants to explore forms and developments of Black mobilities across the circum-Atlantic region from the colonial era to the present. It invites presentations on Black mobilities in and among the Americas, Africa and Europe from a variety of academic disciplines, such as history literature, art...
Chapter
Full-text available
The eminent priest and politician Padre Antonio José Martínez of Taos is known primarily for his antagonism to the bishop of New Mexico. He is held in high esteem among Latina/o New Mexicans to this day as a community activist and educator and has become the subject of several scholarly biographies since the mid-twentieth century. The present essay...
Book
Full-text available
Lone Star Vistas analyzes travelogues that created the idea of Texas during a period of profound social transformation between Mexico’s independence from Spain and the beginning of the US Civil War. Drawing on sources and scholarship in English, Spanish, and German, the book is the first comparative study of transnational travel writing on the regi...
Research
Full-text available
This is a quick preview of the website connected to the research project "Black Inter-American Mobilities and Autobiography in the Age of Revolutions, 1760-1860" (BIMAAR). The actual website can be found at: https://bimaar.net
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter analyses the depiction of the contagious gay male body and its connection to ideas of a deformed identity in Larry Kramer's AIDS plays The Normal Heart (1985) and The Destiny of Me (1992). Based on close readings of the two plays against the backdrop of social discourses of contagion and monstrosity, the chapter investigates how the pl...
Chapter
Full-text available
The article provides a definition of the text genre of travel writing as well as a historical overview of major types of journey accounts produced about the Americas. Since the European colonization of the Americas, various types of travel reports have been catering to the desire of broadening audiences for geographic and cultural knowledge of unfa...
Article
Full-text available
The essay addresses the depiction of the Niagara Falls as an ambivalent symbol of progress in nineteenth-century Mexican travel accounts of the United States. At that time, various Mexican intellectuals spent some time in the USA. In diaries and travelogues, some of them articulated their views of their host country but also reflected on their own...
Chapter
Full-text available
The essay addresses the complex and ambivalent depictions of Texas in German travelogues to the “Lone Star State” from the Vormärz Era, offering an exemplary analysis of three prominent journey accounts written from distinct socio-political perspectives and resulting from journeys through different parts of the region. It examines three German-auth...
Chapter
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The article focuses on Mexican travelers to the then-Mexican province of Texas in the period between Mexican Independence in 1821 and the Texas Revolution of 1836. It discusses different types of travel writing, ranging from official reports via private journals of government inspectors to travelogues of Mexican intellectuals. These writers voice q...
Article
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Both sport and film play a key role in contemporary US American popular culture. They are widely regarded as legitimate carriers and formative instances of social identities such as ethnicity, gender, or nationality, and they have capitalized upon one another with increasing success. Soccer and soccer films provide a case in point, as both the spor...
Article
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The essay analyzes the political-poetic vision of Latin America formulated in the literary, autobiographical, and essayist works of the black U.S.-American writer Langston Hughes. Hughes was not only one of the most outstanding and prolific artists of the Harlem Renaissance but also the one most interested Latin America and most closely engaging wi...
Book
Full-text available
Within the history of Afro-America/América/Amérique, the Harlem Renaissance represents probably the most prominent, black cultural movement. The present volume seeks to explore some of the Harlem Renaissance’s and Renaissance Harlem’s interactions with the Caribbean as well as Latin America—to be understood in the widest possible sense of the term...
Chapter
Sports and film are two key elements of U.S. American popular culture of the twentieth century. They are widely regarded as legitimate expressions of national identity and values and have capitalized upon one another with increasing success. Drawing upon the importance of sports in U.S. American culture, and linking athletic activity to notions of...
Chapter
Full-text available
Spanish American travel narratives about the United States have been performing a crucial function in reversing the dominant trajectory of “Western” travelers’ routes and gaze – the European or U.S.-American traveling and looking South, East, or West. In contrast to the rather critical perspective of later narratives, Spanish American travel texts...
Chapter
Santa Barraza, a native of the South Texas U.S.-Mexico border region, has often been called the “Artist of the Borderlands” (Herrera-Sobek). Her artwork—consisting of paintings, murals, and other forms of visual art—resembles this highly diverse and intercultural region and “encapsulates a mythic and political reality that is difficult to ignore, s...
Chapter
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Can one, may one really laugh about AIDS? Is it acceptable to make fun of a lethal pandemic that has carried away millions of people in the past three decades? While AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is a fairly recent phenomenon, the issue at stake—the social (in)acceptability of humor, and in particular of stage comedy as an artistic for...
Chapter
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The essay deals with the interactions between the humanities and the natural sciences, specifically the contributions of literature to public perceptions and representatoins of medicine. A recent example of the relevance of literature to this issue includes the voluminous body of literary texts about HIV / AIDS and their discourses in Europe and No...
Chapter
The Harlem Renaissance always had a transnational dimension, a dimension to which black Caribbean immigration to Harlem contributed as well as black U.S. American travels and travails abroad or the interactions among black(-concerned) artists and intellectuals of different nations and their affiliation with the poor and ethnically/racially oppresse...
Article
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The New Mexican territory, an area added to the United States by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848) and the Gadsden Purchase (1853) following the U.S.-Mexico War, was largely Mexican and Amerindian in population, customs, and beliefs in the second half of the nineteenth century. Nevertheless, it witnessed a growing influx of Anglo U.S.-American...
Book
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Taking up the perception of the U.S.-Mexico border region as a transnational social, cultural, and geographic space, the essays of this volume address transnational cultures of the borderlands from multiple perspectives, exploring cultural articulations from the entire border area as well as the complexity and intersectionality of ethnic, national,...
Article
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One of the most contested fields of Latina/o aspirations and public discourses about the Latina/o condition during the 1980s and ‘90s was education. The essay discusses the public roles and political agendas of the Mexican American writer Richard Rodriguez and his autobiography Hunger of Memory (1981), on the one hand, and of the Bolivian teacher J...
Chapter
During the past decades, Latinas/os have gained a stronger presence than ever before in a number of cultural practices at the core of mainstream U.S.-American culture, namely popular music, sports, and cinema. The essay analyzes the ways in which the current tendency of fusing forms and/or contents of these three types of cultural practice provides...
Chapter
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Against the backdrop of Americanist scholarship as well as theater practice in the Socialist German Democratic Republic (GDR) the essay studies the East German reception of African American stage drama, specifically the two plays that were actually produced in GDR theaters: Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun (1959) and James Baldwin’s Blues f...
Chapter
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The essay analyzes discursive identity formations and discourses of belonging as they are presented in two contemporary Chinese American stage plays: Paul Stephen Lim’s Mother Tongue (1988) and Chay Yew’s A Language of Their Own (1994). They centrally depict gay Asian experiences in the contemporary United States in its intersection with social cla...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Mexican American writer Richard Rodríguez and the now-retired Bolivian mathematics teacher Jaime Escalante were two of the major figures in the public discourses about the situation of Latina/os in the United States educational system in the 1980s and 90s. Their positions have crucially informed the educational political debates about affirmati...
Chapter
Full-text available
During the 1920s and 30s, the Soviet Union attracted the attention of many left-leaning Western artists and intellectuals. For African Americans, the Soviet Union had a particular lure, as it promised not only an end to class conflicts but also to racial discrimination against people of color. Two of the most prominent black Western intellectuals w...
Chapter
Full-text available
The AIDS crisis has been felt profoundly in the American art, literary, and theater scene. While the first plays addressing the subject of HIV and AIDS produced on American theater stages focused almost exclusively on the experiences of gay white men, a new generation of plays emerged during the first half of the 1990s which began to make visible s...

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Projects

Projects (7)
Project
In a loose series of essays, this project explores 19th-century Latin American travel writing about North America, especially the United States. It goal is to highlight the contributions of Latin American travelers to the perception and representation of North America. In so doing, it seeks to complement - and provide a Latin American conterpoint to - the considerably larger scholarship on European and North American travelers to the region.
Archived project
The project consists of a series of essays that explore negotiations of race/ethnicity, gender, nation, and popular culture in the context of team sports in U.S. American team sport films since the 1990s.
Archived project
The project analyses the specific contributions American stage drama made to the discourse on HIV/AIDS in the United States from the mid-1980s through the late 1990s. The study maps the diachronic development of this body of work in its increasing thematic, formal, and identity political heterogeneity. It analyses the strategies these plays employed to blend art with activism in order to establish a counter-discourse to the mainstream public debate about AIDS and provide so-cial agency to the affected populations.