Ashley M Tate

Ashley M Tate
Pennsylvania State University | Penn State · Department of Human Development and Family Studies

Master of Science

About

9
Publications
197
Reads
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26
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
26 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220246810
Introduction
Ashley M Stanford currently works at the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University.
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - November 2015
Pennsylvania State University
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Objective and Background The current study examines the types of childhood experiences with mothers (i.e., maternal abuse, affection, discipline) among caregivers of aging mothers and investigates whether membership in specific latent classes, particularly maternal maltreatment, is associated with psychological functioning among caregivers. Method...
Article
Full-text available
Social networks can directly influence the health and well-being of older adults. Some work has suggested that network growth is associated with increased well-being. However, little is known about how the quality of relationships with confidants may be associated with better psychological well-being over and above the number of confidants. We aime...
Article
Objectives: Seminal research with spouses of chronic pain patients indicates that providing patients with instrumental support can be either costly or beneficial for spouses' well-being. Drawing from the invisible support literature, this study evaluated the extent to which patients' recognition of spouses' support moderated daily and long-term as...
Article
The current study tested the hypotheses that knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and spouses who report more spousal understanding of patient's pain would report greater marital satisfaction. A total of 124 couples completed interviews at three time points across 18 months. Results from dyadic analyses showed that patients who felt more understood by...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined two types of illness-related communication (disclosure and holding back) and their associations with psychological adjustment and marital satisfaction in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and their spouses. A sample of 142 couples reported on disclosure and holding back of OA-related concerns, marital satisfaction, and depr...
Article
Full-text available
Background Greater marital quality is associated with better psychological and physical health. The quality of daily marital interactions is likely to be especially important for individuals with chronic illness, but this question has received little attention. Purpose Using data from two diary studies, the current study examined whether individua...
Article
Osteoarthritis (OA) patients who tend to hold back disclosing pain or other arthritis-related concerns to their spouse report poorer illness adjustment (Porter et al., 2008). Greater self-efficacy for communicating breast cancer symptoms is related to less holding back (Edmond et al., 2013); however, it is not known if patients’ self-efficacy for c...
Article
Lifespace is the purposeful movement throughout one’s environment and is a central aspect of healthy aging. As fluid cognitive abilities are strongly linked to lifespace, targeted cognitive interventions may preserve lifepace in older adults. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of three separate cognitive interventions (reasoning...
Article
Spouses’ greater understanding of the pain experience of older patients has shown to be beneficial for both members of the dyad. However, spouses tend to over-estimate patients’ pain, which may be explained by variations in self-efficacy for understanding pain (spouse) or communicating pain (patient). Although previous work suggests that patient an...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project is interested in the connections between changes in health and close relationships as people age. Participation in the Transitions study consists of an annual interview in the home and completion of an online survey six months after each interview. The interview and survey questions focus on health, well-being, and relationships.
Project
This daily diary study of 152 older adults with knee osteoarthritis and their spouses focuses on spouses’ daily behaviors (e.g., empathic responses, autonomy support, and solicitousness). Our overall goal is to examine the effects of daily positive and negative spousal behaviors on patient functioning (pain, mood, sleep, physical activity) and whether daily illness cognitions (i.e., self-efficacy, catastrophizing) explain these effects. Patients and spouses were assessed three times per day using electronic diaries while also wearing accelerometers to measure daytime physical activity. We are also exploring the impact of gender on dyadic processes.