Ashley N. Schulz

Ashley N. Schulz
Mississippi State University | MSU · Department of Forestry

Ph.D.

About

12
Publications
4,104
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
89
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
89 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
Additional affiliations
August 2021 - present
Mississippi State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2020 - August 2021
Colorado State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2015 - December 2019
Arkansas State University - Jonesboro
Position
  • Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant
Description
  • Instructor Principles and Practices of Forestry (Fall 2018) Teaching Assistant Economic Entomology Lab (Spring 2018); Mycology Lab (Fall 2017)
Education
August 2015 - May 2020
Arkansas State University - Jonesboro
Field of study
  • Environmental Science
August 2013 - July 2015
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Forest Resources
August 2008 - May 2013
University of Missouri
Field of study
  • Forestry

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Some introduced species cause severe damage, though the majority have little impact. Robust predictions of which species are most likely to cause substantial impacts could focus efforts to mitigate those impacts or prevent certain invasions entirely. Introduced herbivorous insects can reduce crop yield, fundamentally alter natural and managed fores...
Article
Full-text available
Non-native organisms have invaded novel ecosystems for centuries, yet we have only a limited understanding of why their impacts vary widely from minor to severe. Predicting the impact of non-established or newly detected species could help focus biosecurity measures on species with the highest potential to cause widespread damage. However, predicti...
Article
Full-text available
To control non-native species, resource managers may import and introduce biocontrol agents. Like accidentally introduced insects, biocontrol agents must overcome several abiotic and biotic obstacles to establish successfully. They can also have varying efficacy and negative or positive impacts on native species and ecosystems. Given the similariti...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the ecological and economic impacts of non-native species is crucial to providing managers and policymakers with the information necessary to respond effectively. Most non-native species have minimal impacts on the environment in which they are introduced, but a small fraction are highly deleterious. The definition of ‘damaging’ or ‘high-...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract A long‐standing goal of invasion biology is to identify factors driving highly variable impacts of non‐native species. Although hypotheses exist that emphasize the role of evolutionary history (e.g., enemy release hypothesis & defense‐free space hypothesis), predicting the impact of non‐native herbivorous insects has eluded scientists for...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the successes and failures of nonnative species remains challenging. In recent decades, researchers have developed the enemy release hypothesis and other antagonist hypotheses, which posit that nonnative species either fail or succeed in a novel range because of the presence or absence of antagonists. The premise of classical biologic...
Article
Matsucoccus macrocicatrices Richards (Hemiptera: Matsucoccidae) is the only species within this genus that feeds and reproduces on eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.), and at the time of its description, was not observed or known to cause serious damage. With eastern white pine dieback occurring extensively throughout the Appalachian Mountains, r...
Article
A novel and emerging eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) dieback phenomenon is occurring in the Southern Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States. Symptomatic eastern white pine trees exhibit canopy thinning, branch dieback, and cankers on the branches and bole. These symptoms are often associated with the presence of a scale insect, Ma...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is an ecologically and economically important conifer tree species found across the eastern region of North America. Recently, white pines in the southeastern U.S. have started showing signs of dieback with multiple canker formations and pitching. A closer investigation revealed that a scale insect, Matsucoccus ma...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is an ecologically and economically important conifer species in North America. It has been grown for everything from wildlife habitat to old coal mine soil reclamation, Christmas tree, ship mast, and match production. Recently, white pines in the southeastern United States started showing signs of dieback includi...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
Demonstrate links between invasion ecology and biological control, and utility of biological control for better understanding invasion processes.
Archived project
Novel Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus L.) dieback phenomenon in the eastern USA and Canada.