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Ashfaque Hossain

Ashfaque Hossain
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, RAK Medical and Health Sciences University, Ras Al Khaimah, UAE

Ph.D.

About

56
Publications
10,212
Reads
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1,728
Citations
Citations since 2017
20 Research Items
503 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Additional affiliations
September 2008 - August 2016
University of Hail
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Full-text available
Nipah virus (NiV) belongs to the biosafety level four (BSL-4) group of human pathogens of zoonotic origin. It is an emerging pathogen capable of causing a variety of clinical presentations, including encephalitis and severe acute respiratory illness, which can be fatal. Interestingly, it can also cause asymptomatic infections, which can relapse aft...
Article
Full-text available
Indoor air environments contain a complex mixture of bioaerosols containing bacteria, protozoans, viruses possibly including SARS CoV-2 causing COVID-19, and their by-products as well such as endotoxins, mycotoxins, and volatile microbial organic compounds. Bioaerosols are forms of air particles, present mostly in the indoor air that humans inhale....
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Although many bacterial culture media are available commercially, there is a continuous effort to develop better selective media for bacteria, which cannot be grown on existing media. While exploring antibacterial properties of clove, we observed that it has the potential to selectively inhibit growth of certain types of bacteria. This...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Objectives: The multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogenic infection is one of the chief worldwide public health threat to humanity. The development of novel antibiotics against MDR Gram negative bacteria has reduced over the last half century. Research is in progress regarding the treatment strategies that could be engaged in co...
Article
Full-text available
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first reported in December 2019, in the City of Wuhan, China. Within the span of a few weeks, the disease had spread to other regions of China and eventually to different parts of the world. COVID 19 has affected 221 countries and territories around the world, with a total of 121,290,697 positive cases and 2,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Objective: Although many bacterial culture media are commercially available, there is a continuous effort to develop better selective media for bacteria, which cannot be grown on existing media. While exploring antibacterial properties of clove, we observed that it has the potential to selectively inhibit growth of certain types of bacteria. This l...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aim: Paracetamol (PCM) ingestion is one of the most frequent global causes of toxicity. Salvadora persica L. is a plant that among many other effects exhibits potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer effects. In this study, we investigated the possible protective effect of S. persica aqueous extract in th...
Article
Full-text available
In many aspects of life quality, bio-contaminants and indoor air quality have had catastrophic consequences, including a negative impact on human health with an increased prevalence of allergic respiratory reactions, asthma, and infectious diseases. We aimed to evaluate the quality of indoor air environment and find out the association between huma...
Article
Full-text available
Cell phones are the most common gadgets used in today’s world. Studies from different countries demonstrated that these electronic gadgets can carry different bacterial species, including potential pathogenic strains. These gadgets are in the hands of every health care professionals (HCPs) and can even be found in the operation theatres (OT). Moreo...
Article
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Background: Streptococcus mutans is a major cause of dental caries. Its capacity to produce biofilm is fundamental in the pathogenesis of this ubiquitous condition. As maintaining a healthy dentition is a genuine goal given the contemporary advance in caries control, researchers are striving to achieve a breakthrough in caries therapy. We are taki...
Poster
Full-text available
This is an e-poster describing a neglected effect of vitamin C on S. mutans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that employs the BPC (biofilm prevention concentration) and its derivative measures in studying the effect of vitamin C on S. mutans biofilm-forming capacity. We employed existing research methods to analyze a clinical...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Streptococcus mutans is a major cause of dental caries. Its capacity to produce biofilm is fundamental in the pathogenesis of this ubiquitous condition. As maintaining a healthy dentition is a genuine goal given the contemporary advance in caries control, researchers are striving to achieve a breakthrough in caries therapy. We are taking...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Streptococcus mutans is a major cause of dental caries. Its capacity to produce biofilm is fundamental in the pathogenesis of this ubiquitous condition. As maintaining a healthy dentition is a genuine goal given the contemporary advance in caries control, researchers are striving to achieve a breakthrough in caries therapy. We are takin...
Article
Full-text available
Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. We investigated the effects of Subcutaneous (SC) glucose administration on the expression of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GKS-3) isomers (α and β) genes in the cerebral cortex of mice with the aim of determining the possible mechanism(s) involved in mitochondrial dysfunctio...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oral cavity as well as acidic pH on dental enamel surface due to the metabolic activities of bacterial plaque are the major contributors in the development and progression of dental caries. Along with other factors, deposition or dissolution Ca and Mg mostly determines the re- or deminer...
Article
Full-text available
Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats are the centerpiece of a robust adaptive bacterial immune system that forms the basis for the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic engineering technology. CRISPR-associated protein-9 (Cas9) is part of this immune system that seeks out, cuts, and degrades viral DNA. By taking advantage of the CRISPR-Cas9 system, a...
Article
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Article
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Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen to human and animals and causes a wide array of diseases including histotoxic and gastrointestinal illnesses. C. perfringens spores are crucial in terms of the pathogenicity of this bacterium because they can survive as dormant state in the environment and get back to live bacteria when come in conta...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated whether tuberculous prostatitis is common among patients with different prostatic lesions including prostate cancer in Bangladesh. None of the 85 biopsy sample revealed acid fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N) microscopy or the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Moreover, eight samples...
Article
Biofilm production potential of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated in this study. Isolates from blood and wound produced biofilm but wound isolates produced relatively higher amounts. Sequential passage of the P. aeruginosa strains in biofilm culture in trypticase soy broth (TSB) resulted in gradually increasing amount of...
Article
Full-text available
Current food safety issues are deleteriously reshaping the life style of the population in the developing world. Socioeconomic status of the population in poorer economies is one of the major determinants to delineate the availability of safe food to the vulnerable population. Assessment of the prevalence of foodborne illness in developing world is...
Article
Full-text available
The chemopreventive potential of cardamom was evaluated on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-initiated and croton oil-promoted mouse skin papillomagenesis. A significant reduction in the values of tumor incidence, tumor burden, and tumor yield and the cumulative number of papillomas was observed in mice treated orally with 0.5 mg of cardamom powder in...
Article
We here report for the first time that human B cell express bone specific alkaline phosphatase. Using a monoclonal antibody against bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), its expression was detected in approximately 50% of circulating B cells but not T cells. Using RT-PCR, BAP specific transcripts were detected in the B cells expressing surface...
Article
Full-text available
DQ-113 was compared in vitro to sitafloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin for potential to select mutational resistance in multiresistant staphylococci, pneumococci, and enterococci. Its ability to select less-susceptible mutants varied according to species, being lowest with staphylococci, intermediate with pneumococci, and great...
Article
Full-text available
Newer beta-lactamases such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), transferable AmpC beta-lactamases, and carbapenemases are associated with laboratory testing problems of false susceptibility that can lead to inappropriate therapy for infected patients. Because there appears to be a lack of awareness of these enzymes, a study was conducted d...
Article
Full-text available
Organisms producing CTX-M-β-lactamases are emerging around the world as a source of resistance to oxyiminocephalosporins such as cefotaxime (CTX). However, the laboratory detection of these strains is not well defined. In this study, a molecular detection assay for the identification of CTX-M-β-lactamase genes was developed and used to investigate...
Article
Full-text available
A strain of an Enterobacter sp. with reduced susceptibility to imipenem, which produced a plasmid-mediated class A carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzyme, KPC-2 β-lactamase, was isolated from a patient with sepsis at a Boston hospital. This is the first report of the production of a plasmid-encoded KPC-2 β-lactamase by an Enterobacter sp.
Data
On Sep 21, 2005 this sequence version replaced gi:55274631.
Article
Full-text available
In a previous study with a Salmonella typhimurium strain containing cloned ampC-ampR from Enterobacter cloacae, it was suggested that ampC expression must be kept at low levels by AmpR to maintain normal growth and virulent phenotype. The purpose of this study was to determine whether findings obtained with a laboratory model can be extended to a v...
Article
Full-text available
High-level expression of AmpC beta-lactamases results in organisms resistant to multiple beta-lactam antibiotics. The mechanism of chromosomally mediated AmpC resistance has been elucidated, however the mechanism(s) driving plasmid-encoded AmpC resistance are unknown. Studies were designed to identify factors which influence expression of plasmid-e...
Article
Full-text available
Four isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae obtained from patients at a Maryland medical centre exhibited reduced susceptibility to carbapenems and were found to produce the novel, class A, plasmid-mediated, carbapenem-hydrolysing enzyme, KPC-2. This enzyme has 99% identity with the plasmid-mediated, carbapenem-hydrolysing enzyme KPC-1, reported previou...
Article
Full-text available
Beta-lactam resistance in Salmonella isolates is increasing. This paper describes the combination of three different beta-lactamases, OXA-30, SHV-9 and CMY-7, expressed by an isolate of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium. This is the first report of an isolate of Salmonella having both an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and an AmpC beta-lact...
Article
Full-text available
Despite productive viral gene expression in the peripheral nervous system during acute infection, the bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) infection cycle is blocked in sensory ganglionic neurons and consequently latency is established. The only abundant viral transcript expressed during latency is the latency-related (LR) RNA. LR gene products inhibit S-p...
Article
Full-text available
Small DNA viruses (adenoviruses, simian virus 40, or human papillomaviruses) induce S-phase progression but prevent cell division to provide precursors for viral DNA replication. Herpes simplex viruses types 1 or 2 (HSV-1 or HSV-2) contain genes which encode DNA-metabolizing enzymes, for example, ribonucleotide reductase, thymidine kinase and dUTPa...
Article
Full-text available
This work focuses mainly on the effect of NaCl along with other mono and divalent anions and cations at pH 4 on survival and virulence properties of Aeromonas hydrophila. To find the optimum stress condition, effects of several other physical factors on NaCl induction were also assayed. A. hydrophila collected from International Center for Diarrhea...
Article
Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) establishes a latent infection in the sensory ganglionic neurons of cattle. The exclusive viral RNA expressed in a latent infection is the latency-related (LR) RNA, suggesting that it regulates some aspect of a latent infection. During the course of a productive infection, alphaherpesviruses induce certain events which...
Article
Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) establishes a latent infection in sensory ganglionic neurons of infected animals. Expression of latency-related (LR) gene products is controlled by a 980-bp fragment (LR promoter). DNA sequence analysis revealed that two major open reading frames (ORFs) are in the LR gene. Antibodies directed against both ORFs were gene...
Article
Full-text available
Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) can grow well in protein rich medium and are capable of producing extracellular protease(s). Enzyme activities of three locally isolated strains Bt-1, Bt-5 and Bt-11 were determined by monitoring hydrolysis of gelatin and casein. The extracellular protease activity of these three Bt were also determined in the culture fi...
Article
Serotype-specificity and sensitivity of oligonucleotide probes to serotype human rotaviruses was assessed. Probes could detect as little as 6.3 ng of homologous RNA and none reacted with as much as 100 ng of heterologous RNA. Northern-blot analysis revealed that probes reacted with one of genomic segments 7, 8 or 9 of corresponding serotypes.
Article
Production of mucinase and neuraminidase by Shigella spp. and their ability to bind to mucin was investigated. All four species of Shigella produced these enzymes. Virulent and avirulent pairs of Shigella did not differ in their ability to produce the enzymes after 18 h of growth. However, a significant difference in neuraminidase production was no...
Article
Full-text available
Genomic diversity of 248 rotavirus strains from stools collected from patients that sought treatment for diarrhoea in Matlab, Bangladesh, between July 1987 and May 1989, was investigated by analysis of migration patterns of viral genomic ribonucleic acid (RNA) segments by electrophoresis. One hundred and seventy-three gave an electropherotype; 90 w...
Article
Full-text available
The possibility of use of a single hybridization temperature instead of different temperature for different probes for detection of human group A rotavirus (HRV) was explored. The sensitivity and specificity of the 5 oligonucleotide probes were assessed using cell culture adapted rotavirus (RV) strains by carrying out hybridization at a fixed tempe...
Article
Full-text available
Localized, diffuse, and aggregative adherence patterns of Escherichia coli identified with specific DNA probes were compared in cell culture adherence assays by using the Center for Vaccine Development, Baltimore, method, the University of Texas Medical School, Houston (UTH), method, and a modified UTH method. Increasing postwash incubation time fr...
Article
Full-text available
Entero-invasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) and shigellae were tested for contact-haemolysin (CH) with red blood cells (RBCs) of guinea-pig, rabbit, rat, mouse, monkey, man, sheep and chicken; all bacteria showed the best lysis with guinea-pig RBCs. The best culture medium for CH activity of shigellae was tryptic soy broth, and for EIEC it was casamino...
Article
The in vitro production of haemolysin by Vibrio mimicus, a newly described aetiological agent for human diarrhoea, was determined using sheep erythrocytes. The effects of medium composition and sodium chloride concentration on haemolysin production and its heat stability were investigated. The haemolysin was produced optimally in brain-heart infusi...

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