Aryo Danusiri

Aryo Danusiri
University of Indonesia | UI · Anthropology

Doctor of Philosophy
Invited Visiting Researcher at Stockholm Center for Global Asia

About

10
Publications
1,783
Reads
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23
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - May 2015
Harvard University
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • ANTH 1682 "Gangsters and Troublesome Populations" Professor Dr. Laurance Ralph
Education
August 2011 - May 2021
Harvard University
Field of study
  • Social Anthropology & Critical Media Practice
September 2003 - September 2005
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Field of study
  • Visual Anthropology

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
This article is about the use of observational camera style in articulating intersubjectivity. The case is my experience in making Lukas' Moment (2005), an ethnographic film shot in Merauke, Papua. The film is about Papuans’ intersubjectivity toward indigeneity in the post-2000 riot Papua. I observed the experiences of three Papuan entrepreneurs in...
Article
Full-text available
This article is my retrospective account on the making of one of my testimonial documentaries, “Kameng Gampoeng Nyang Keunong Geulawa” (The Village Goat that Takes the Beating, 1999) which was commissioned by a human rights-defender NGO based in Jakarta. The aim was to offer critical views on the Aceh conflict to the Indonesian public. By using chr...
Article
Full-text available
Space is never neutral. Power always needs space to realize its authority in the process of domination. Without space, power is forever only potential. Chronopolitics, or time politics, is a method of modern power for representing whether a space is urban-modern and not rural-traditional; that the river banks must be free of occupation for a city t...
Research
Full-text available
"People might find Arie Kriting’s criticism to be harsh. But Papuans have long been subject to economic and cultural discrimination. This discrimination derives from Jakarta’s complicated history of conflicts with the local people. Indonesia has always had a level of racism towards its minority ethnic groups, particularly undervaluing the Papuans...
Thesis
Full-text available
A striking new phenomenon in Indonesia since the fall of President Suharto (1998) is the heightened public visibility of different Islamic groups, which vie with each other for attention in the national capital, Jakarta, and elsewhere with increasing boldness. Of particular interest are the Sufi-oriented voluntary study groups led by young scholars...
Article
Full-text available
Kebijakan Negara dalam pendekatan semiotika.
Chapter
Full-text available
A book by metroZones, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, and Europa-Universität Viadrina metroZones 13

Projects

Project (1)
Project
A striking new phenomenon in Indonesia since the fall of President Suharto (1998) is the heightened public visibility of different Islamic groups, which vie with each other for attention in the national capital, Jakarta, and elsewhere with increasing boldness. Of particular interest are the Sufi-oriented voluntary study groups led by young scholars of Arab Hadrami sayyid descent. Since 2006, these groups have weekly unleashed lavish multimedia performances on Jakarta’s streets, taking advantage of the perpetual traffic jams by engaging passers-by and halting cars. These motorcades move across and around Jakarta’s roadways, parks, and other public places, as well as mosques and tombs, attracting tens of thousands of young adherents. The followers of this movement are highly mobile, using motorbikes, communication technologies, and Internet. Remarkably, these weekly events celebrate mawlid or the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad, which, until recently, was an annual event sponsored by the State and celebrated through a range of vernacular religious rituals. It unsettles the secular status of urban public spaces and worries many self-identifying secularist Indonesians. By focusing on the critical practices of these Islamic youth groups in assembling various circulatory forms, I will examine the ways in which these groups invoke their ‘right to the city,’ remaking urban-sacred networks and cultivating new subjectivities. How do these practices of circulation shape religious experience and address the political interests of the participants? What tactics do study groups utilize to navigate the spatial, social, and political landscapes of Jakarta? What kind of local, national and transnational networks do they have to support this strategy of preaching? By posing mobility as an interface of urban tactics, moral discipline and citizen formation, I contribute to the emerging theorization of religion, new media, the urban and Islamic youth movement in the global south.