Arunachalam Subbiah

Arunachalam Subbiah
Centre for Internet and Society | CIS

M.Sc

About

125
Publications
33,010
Reads
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2,400
Citations
Introduction
Arunachalam Subbiah is currently a Visiting Professor at the DST Centre for Science Policy, Indian Institute of Science. Their current project is 'Evaluating India's research performance in different fields'. He is also a Distinguished Fellow at the Centre for Internet & Society, Bangalore. Earlier, he was a Distinguished Fellow at the M S Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai, for 12 years (1996-2008), where he was a key member of the ICT-enabled development project. His main areas of research are scientometrics, scholarly communication (particularly open access and improving access to information in the developing world).
Additional affiliations
July 2008 - present
Centre for Internet and Society
Position
  • Distinguished Fellow
Description
  • Research and promote open access. Member, EPT UK. Research in scientometrics and information science. Fellow of CILIP, UK, Life Member, IASLIC, India. Teach science journalism at Asian College of Journalism, Chennai (three months a year).
April 1996 - April 2008
M S Swamininathan Research Foundation
Position
  • Distinguished Fellow
Description
  • My work was in the area of information & communication technology for development. I developed South-South cooperation for sharing knowledge and experience and conducted four workshops for development workers from Africa, Asia and Latin America.
April 1992 - April 1996
Central Electrochemical Research Institute
Position
  • Managing Director
Education
June 1961 - April 1963
Annamalai University
Field of study
  • Chemistry

Publications

Publications (125)
Preprint
Papers from India are cited 14.68 times on average compared to cites per paper of 45.34 for Singapore, 30.47 for USA, 23.12 for China, 26.51 for the UK, 21.77 for South Korea and 24.77 for Germany. Less than 39% of papers from India are found in quartile 1 (high impact factor) journals, compared to 53.6% for China and 53.8% for South Korea. Percent...
Article
Full-text available
The evaluation of performance in scientific research at any level - whether at the individual, institutional, research council or country level - is not easy. Traditionally, research evaluation at the individual and institutional levels has depended largely on peer opinion, but with the rapid growth of science over the last century and the availabi...
Article
Full-text available
Against the backdrop of comments on chemistry research in India made in three recent reports prepared by Nature Index, Elsevier and Thomson Reuters, we have made a scientometric analysis of contributions from India in leading multidisciplinary chemistry journals over the 25-year period 1991-2015. We have compared India's performance with that of Ch...
Article
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Paying to publish is an ethical issue. During 2010-14, Indian researchers have used 488 open access (OA) journals levying article processing charge (APC), ranging from US$ 7.5 to 5,000, to publish about 15,400 papers. Use of OA journals levying APC has increased from 242 journals and 2,557 papers in 2010 to 328 journals and 3,634 papers in 2014. We...
Article
ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID, is a non-profit, community-driven effort to create and maintain a registry of unique researcher identifiers and a transparent method of linking research activities and outputs to these identifiers. Together with other persistent identifiers for scholarly works such as digital object identifiers(DOIs) a...
Article
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A few commercial publishers dominate provision of access to scientific and technical information sought after by researchers around the world. Increasing subscription prices of journals at rates higher than general inflation caused librarians to think of forming consortia, but publishers started selling online journals as bundles, and libraries end...
Article
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Indian researchers have published more than 43,400 papers in over 4,600 journals in 2009 as seen from Science Citation Index (SCI) – Expanded. Of these, over 6,900 (or one in six) papers were published in 445 open cess (OA) journals. The proportion of papers published by Indian researchers in OA journals is considerably higher than the world averag...
Article
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Most of the papers published in the more than 360 Indian open access journals are by Indian researchers. But how many papers do they publish in high impact international open access journals? We have looked at India's contribution to all seven Public Library of Science (PLoS) journals, 10 BioMed Central (BMC) journals and Acta Crystallographica Sec...
Article
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Leslie Chan and colleagues discuss the value of open access not just for access to health information, but also for transforming structural inequity in current academic reward systems and for valuing scholarship from the South.
Article
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Cholera research in India over the past six decades has been mapped using HistCite. The analysis based on data from Science Citation Index Expanded reveals not only the significant papers, key players, important institutions and core journals, but also provides a visual representation of evolution of knowledge in the field showing the cognitive lin...
Article
Open access brings greater visibility and impact to the work of scientists as is evidenced in the examples discussed in this paper. Researchers are often reluctant and afraid to deposit their works in Institutional Repositories. However, as is shown here, once they do so, they do not regret it. Open access will shortly become the norm and will be a...
Article
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Research papers published by Chinese and Indian researchers during 1998–2007 and cited at least 100 times by end of 2009 are analysed. There were 776 papers with at least one author from India (amounting to 0.32% of all papers from India) and 2260 papers with at least one author from China (0.4% of all papers from China) that have gone on to be cit...
Book
Full-text available
GISWatch 2009 focuses on access to online information and knowledge – advancing human rights and democracy. It includes several thematic reports dealing with key issues in the field, as well as an institutional overview and a reflection on indicators that track access to information and knowledge. There is also an innovative section on visual mappi...
Article
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Access to health research publications is an essential requirement in securing the chain of communication from the researcher to the front-line health worker. As the diagram of the knowledge cycle from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research shows, health knowledge generated in the world's laboratories is passed down the information chain throug...
Article
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Fuel-cell research in China, India, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan, over the years 1983-2007 is analysed and compared with that in USA for number of papers, document type, journals used and international collaboration. For India and China we have also identified the key researchers and institutions. Using HistCite, the visualization techn...
Article
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other sources as well, such as Scopus, Sociological Abstracts, 3
Article
The open access movement, well known in the domain of journal articles, came about because of several reasons. These include scholars’ and researchers‘ willingness to share knowledge, and advances in technology which enabled opening up free access to information. Journal publishers who raised the subscription rates exorbitantly also forced research...
Chapter
Open access is a key issue in the development of the information society. It may also shape the extent to which the generation of new scientific and scholarly research itself can be tuned to the future needs of developed and developing countries. Much of the promise of e-science is based on an implicit notion that open access will accelerate scient...
Article
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To gain insights into the potentials and characteristics of health biotechnology in developing countries, we carried out an analysis of health biotechnology publications in developing nations that have had some successes in this field. We analysed the patterns of health biotechnology publications of authors from seven developing countries from 1991...
Article
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The science base in the developing world cannot be strengthened without access to the global library of research information. Currently, this is nearly impossible due to the high costs of journal subscriptions, with the result that even the most prestigious institutes in poorer countries cannot afford to buy the journals they need. Many initiatives...
Article
Public domain information, whether limited to judicial decisions or extended to all government-authored or sponsored works, has been expounded as a means of ensuring a knowledgeable citizenry, promoting economic advancement, and ensuring that publicly funded information is not “double taxed”. However, the public domain has come under increased pres...
Article
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"Knowledge and information are essential for people to respond successfully to the opportunities and challenges of social, economic and technological changes (...). But to be useful, knowledge and information must be effectively communicated to people", says the Food and Agricultural Organization. India is home to a number of ICT-enabled developmen...
Chapter
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Scientists in developing countries have access to only a tiny fraction of the information they need, and their own contribution to science is hardly noticed by others. It is important that these countries strengthen their scientific research and that their scientists become fully integrated members of the worldwide network of science. But, unfortun...
Article
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In a world of inequality, the open access initiative seeks to provide people all over the world (irrespective of where they live) with equal access to knowledge and information. This paper examines the concept of open access initiative from the perspective of the developing world. Highlighting the benefits developing countries stands to gain from t...
Article
The role that information and communication technologies (ICTs) can play in poverty alleviation is discussed based largely on what has happened in the past six years in a cluster of ten villages in Pondicherry, southern India through the intervention of the M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai. If intelligently used, ICTs can make a differ...
Article
This paper describes the village knowledge centers in Pondicherry, southern India, which aim to empower the poor and the marginalized through information technology-enabled information access. Mobilizing people and understanding their context and needs on the one hand and marshaling the content that is relevant to the people's needs and choosing th...
Article
The difference between the advanced and developing countries in the matter of access to information for research has been continually increasing. The advent of the Internet and electronic sources of information has not only exacerbated the gap but also led to the exclusion of developing country researchers from taking part as equal partners in publ...
Article
The difference between the advanced and developing countries in the matter of access to information for research has been continually increasing. The advent of the Internet and electronic sources of information has not only exacerbated the gap but also led to the exclusion of developing country researchers from taking part as equal partners in publ...
Article
Often funding agencies and donor governments face the question should they support information and communication technology (ICT) activities in their development projects. Should the money be invested in computers and communication devices or will it be better spent on food, shelter, health and education? The choice need not be ‘either/or’. If used...
Article
Often funding agencies and donor governments face the question as to whether they should support the integration of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their development projects. Should the money be invested in computers and communication equipment or will it be better spent on food, shelter, health, and education? The choice need...
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We have mapped and evaluated diabetes research in India and China, based oil papers published during 1990-1999 and indexed in PubMed, Science Citation Index (SCI) and biochemistry and Biophysics Citation Index (BBCI) and citations to each one of these papers lip to 2000. We have identified institutions carrying out diabetes research, journals used...
Article
Full-text available
We have mapped and evaluated diabetes research in India and China, based on papers published during 1990–1999 and indexed in PubMed, Science Citation Index (SCI) and Biochemistry and Biophysics Citation Index (BBCI) and citations to each one of these papers up to 2000. We have identified institutions carrying out diabetes research, journals used to...
Article
Full-text available
India and China lead the world in the incidence of tuberculosis (TB), accounting for 23% and 17% respectively, of the global burden of the disease and hold the 15th and the 18th positions in terms of incidence per 100,000 population. But India accounts for only about 5–6% of the world’s research output in this area and China a paltry 1% as seen fro...
Article
Full-text available
Often funding agencies and donor governments face the question should they support ICT activities in their development projects. Should the money be invested in computers and communication devices or will it be better spent on food, shelter, health, and education? The choice need not be 'either or'. If used intelligently and innovatively, ICTs can...
Article
Full-text available
Mathematics research in India, as reflected by papers indexed inMathsci 1988–1998, is quantified and mapped. Statistics, quantum theory and general topology are the three subfields contributing the most to India's output in mathematics research, followed by special functions, economics and operations research, and relativity and gravitational theor...
Article
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Fish and aquaculture research in the People's Republic of China over the six years 1994-1999 has been mapped using data from six databases– three abstracting services and three citation indexes. The results are compared with fish science research in India. During the six years China has published 2035 papers (roughly 4.5 –5% of the world output) an...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We hare mapped cardiovascular diseases research carried out in India and People's Republic of China in the ten years 1990-1999. The analysis is based on all papers from the two countries indexed in three databases, viz. PubMed, Science Citation Index and Biochemistry and Biophysics Citation Index, and citations to each one of the papers up to the e...
Chapter
The widespread availability and convergence of information and communication technologies — computers, digital networks, telecommunication, television, etc. — have led to an unprecedented capacity for dissemination of knowledge and information. The impact of this fourth information revolution is felt in education, research, medicine, government, bu...
Article
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Fish and aquaculture research in India has been mapped using data from six databases. About 460 papers, roughly 5.5% of the world output, come from India every year, of which 82% are journal articles. Close to 70% of journal articles have appeared in 113 Indian journals. Less than a third of the journal arti-cles are published in journals indexed i...
Article
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Using data from SCI 1998, we have analysed inter-national collaboration in science in 11 Asian countries. Papers resulting from collaboration among these countries and with G7, European Union, OECD and selected Latin American and African countries were classified under subject categories to characterize each country’s total and collaborated scienti...
Article
Editor—Medicine usually fails marginalised people, as Smith observed.1 But it is not just medicine that fails them. Every technology invented so far has failed them and will continue to do so. Information and communication technologies have exacerbated the divide between rich and poor nations and have also further marginalised those who are already...
Article
EDITOR—“Because rich countries remain the main source of new knowledge and new technologies, responsibility for finding paths to sustainability rests mainly with them.”1 Well said. Unfortunately, the rich countries, or at least the dominant sections in rich countries, have not yet learnt to view the world as a single whole. The world continues to b...
Article
From an analysis of papers indexed in three years of Biochemistry and Biophysics Citation Index (1992, 1995 and 1998), it is found that 103 institutions in Israel have published 4,112 papers in more than 990 journals and 64 non-journal sources published from 27 countries. More than 16% of papers have appeared in journals with an impact factor (IF)...
Article
The extent of international collaboration in science, as evidenced by internationally co-authored research publications, is on the rise. The lion's share of international collaboration takes place among the rich countries, especially the G7 nations. International collaboration among poorer countries and between rich and poor countries is rather lim...
Article
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Tamil Nadu will soon become the first state in India to provide telemedicine in the public setter when the local hospital in Thiruvallur is connected to the Chennai Medical College (about 40 km away) through an integrated services digital network (ISDN) line and linked terminals. Tamil Nadu cannot yet connect every district and taluk hospital to th...
Article
The current digital revolution, the fourth information revolution in history after the invention of writing, the book and printing, has serious potential to exacerbate the gulf between the North and the South. As has been observed in the USA, even within an affluent country, with inadequate policy interventions, information technology not only wide...
Article
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Life sciences research in India, as seen from Biological Abstracts (1992-1994), is quantified and mapped. Researchers from over 1,400 institutions located in over 450 cities/towns have authored 20,046 papers in 1,582 journals published from 52 countries. About 46% of Indian papers have appeared in non-SCI journals, and a further 37.5% in journals w...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Full text only (Available in the book Debates on Issues of Our Common Future, edited by Wilhelm Krull, published by Velbruck Wissenschaft, Weilerswist, Germany, 2000)
Article
The principal dilemma of the internet is that, while its anarchic nature is desirable for fostering open debate without censorship, this raises questions about the quality of information available, which could inhibit its usefulness. While the internet allows “medical minority interest groups to access information of critical interest to them so th...
Article
Full-text available
With a view to mapping scientific research in India, we have analysed papers originating in India and indexed in the CD-ROM version of Science Citation Index (SCI) in the four years 1989-1992 With more than 10,000 papers in each year (more than 42,000 papers in about 2,300 journals indexed in SCI in the four years), India is the twelfth largest pub...
Article
This paper attempts to map medical research in India and answer an important policy question by literature analysis. I match the disease pattern on the basis of mortality and morbidity statistics with journals used by Indian medical researchers to publish their work as shown by the Science Citation Index (SCI). The former reflects the needs while t...
Article
Explores how technology exacerbates already existing inequalities for scientists in developing nations. Discusses information dissemination, access to information in cyberspace, technological infrastructure, and the exclusion of scientists and scholars in developing nations from the collective international discourse essential for making progress i...
Article
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CAB Abstracts 1998 had indexed 11,855 publications from India, including 10,412 journal arti-cles,from more than 1280 institutions in 531 locations. These were classified into 21 major re-search fields and 243 subfields. ‘Plants of economic importance’ (FF) is the leading area of research in India, followed by ‘Animal science’ (LL). The three subfi...
Article
Does India perform medical research in areas where it is most needed? According to Government of India sources, India suffers mainly from diarrhoeal diseases, infancy diseases, respiratory diseases, tuberculosis and malaria. An analysis of journal use as seen from seven years of Medline reveals that Indian researchers are active in general and inte...
Article
Science is a global phenomenon that knows no frontiers. But in the real world, production and efficient utilization of scientific knowledge are highly concentrated in a few countries. A large majority of countries—those on the periphery, contribute precious little to the growth of scientific knowledge. Indeed, the distribution of science is even mo...
Article
Science in the last few years has become increasingly global and collaborative. The number of internationally coauthored papers has been increasing steadily. We have counted internationally jointly authored papers involving authors from the advanced countries and the Third World countries, usingSCI 1991. We have looked at the number of papers resul...
Article
Making Third World publications accessible to scientists and scholars worldwide is more difficult than making advanced country publications accessible to users in the poorer countries. While much is being done to facilitate the latter, the former seems to be sadly in need of concerted efforts. The need for attitudinal changes in the West and greate...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
To help India's science policy making body, DST