Artur A Steiner

Artur A Steiner
Glasgow Caledonian University | GCU · Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health

Professor

About

56
Publications
31,825
Reads
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1,300
Citations
Citations since 2016
33 Research Items
1182 Citations
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Introduction
Artur Steiner is a Professor in Social Entrepreneurship and Community Development. He leads the Community Development and Citizenship Participation Research Group at the Yunus Centre, Glasgow Caledonian University. His research is about community disadvantage and actions to ameliorate isolation and, through co-production and participation, raise resilience and empowerment. Artur’s work is concerned with evidencing how, through social innovation, entities, policies and interventions tackle social
Additional affiliations
January 2011 - May 2015
Scotland's Rural College
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Full-text available
The “woolliness” and “methodological hurdles” of co‐production make it challenging to compare and contrast different co‐production policy initiatives and their outcomes, and distil ‘what works’, for whom and in what circumstances. Inspired by Nabatchi et al.’s (2017) 3Ws typology of the Who, When and What of co‐production, we draw on co‐production...
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Due to an increasingly turbulent and unpredictable socio-economic environment, the sustainability of many CSOs is frequently questioned. To better understand the financial infrastructure of the social economy in times of crisis, we analyse a unique set of responses from 245 CSOs across eight European countries. Given the transnational nature of cri...
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Recent work in children’s geographies and geographies of education has presented the argument that when conceptualising the various roles that adults occupy in children’s lives, it is equally important to conceptualise adultism. In this paper we argue that this existing work critiques adultism’s logics but does not adequately conceptualise adultism...
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Considering the impacts of the most recent global economic crisis in 2008/2009, this paper explores how firm size, type of business activity and approach to internationalisation influence SMEs’ survival. Based on the literature in the field, we developed three hypotheses regarding determinants of Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) survival. We test...
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Although frequently perceived as a 'woolly' policy concept and a means to reduce public service delivery costs, co-production can lead to increased quality and efficiency of services. In this paper, we explore the contribution of a community empow-erment policy to co-production processes. Analysing empirical findings from a mixed-method, longitudin...
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Using Giddens’s structuration theory and empirical data from a study with social enterprise stakeholders, the article explores how social entrepreneurs and the structure co-create one another. We show that the development of the contemporary significance of social entrepreneurialism lies in a combination of complex context-specific structural force...
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Democracies are under pressure and public administrations must evolve to accommodate new forms of public participation. Participation processes may reproduce or disrupt existing power inequalities. Through a multi-method empirical study of “Participation Requests,” a new legislative policy tool to open up public services in Scotland, this article a...
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With men more susceptible than women to illness and mortality, and less likely to access primary healthcare services, there have been calls for more male friendly spaces within communities to engage 'hard to reach' men in physical health improvement. Research has shown that Men's Shed (Shed) activity can provide localised support for the mental hea...
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Recent policy focus is on the ‘non-obvious’ role of community-based organisations in tackling causes of poor health, such as social exclusion. Men’s Sheds are a type of community-based organisation offering health and wellbeing benefits to men, despite this not being the explicit reason they exist. A qualitative study was conducted in Scotland to i...
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Background Rural health outcomes are often worse than their urban counterparts. While rural health theory recognizes the importance of the social determinants of health, there is a lack of insight into public perspectives for improving rural health beyond the provision of health‐care services. Gaining insight into perceived solutions, that include...
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Although increasingly prominent in research, policy and practice, little is known about social innovation in a rural context. To address this knowledge gap, our paper explores how rurality might affect the social innovation process. Drawing on 68 interviews carried out with beneficiaries, service providers and external stakeholders of a rural socia...
Article
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Background Men’s health is a globally underrepresented area of research and policy. With men facing numerous healthcare barriers, there are calls for more ‘male friendly’ approaches to health improvement that take into consideration differing male behaviours and attitudes towards health. Men’s Sheds are community-based organisations delivering prac...
Article
Full-text available
Recent policy focus is on the ‘non-obvious’ role of community-based organisations in tackling causes of poor health, such as social exclusion. Men’s Sheds are a type of community-based organisation offering health and wellbeing benefits to men, despite this not being the explicit reason they exist. A qualitative study was conducted in Scotland to i...
Article
Full-text available
While policies in support of social and commercial entrepreneurship are widely used to foster economic growth and increase prosperity, little is known about the effectiveness of various interventions. Despite the diversity of approaches, some places remain more conducive to developing entrepreneurship than others. Scotland is an interesting context...
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The Social Innovation Fund (SIF) - funded by Scottish Government and the European Social Fund - adopts a ‘public venture capital’ model to support socially innovative organisations. This article critically explores the use of public venture capital programmes to fund and grow the social economy through the case study of Heavy Sound Community Intere...
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In this work we present an account of our experiences with a group of graduate students studying social entrepreneurship at Master’s level. They participated in a prominent international business plan competition which challenges students to come up with a solution to a significant real world problem. We facilitated the process of their involvement...
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COOL Music was a twelve-month collaborative project between researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University and practitioners at the Edinburgh-based social enterprise Heavy Sound. The project began in October 2017 and involved sixteen sessions of participatory music making with thirty-two ‘hard to reach’ young people (aged twelve to seventeen) aimed a...
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In recent years, music‐based interventions have been utilised as a tool for improving public health, reducing inequalities and promoting well‐being of young people. Although some researchers have begun to draw links between music‐related interventions and positive health outcomes, there is little understanding as to how such effects are produced. R...
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The global aging demographic is putting pressure on state-delivered health and social care services. As the austerity agenda in the UK cuts state-funded service provision for older people despite increasing demand, social enterprise has become a politically and economically attractive model for the sustainable delivery of some public services. Yet...
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Social enterprise in developed countries Discussion of social enterprise has increased in developed countries over recent decades, promoted in governments’ social and business policies. Social enterprises are defined as businesses with primarily social objectives and an organisational format that uses trading (Dart, 2004). For example, a community...
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Social isolation and loneliness has been classed as a major public health concern due to its negative physical and mental health implications, and living in a remote or rural area is a prominent contributing risk factor. Community-led social enterprise models are recognised in government policy as a potential preventative measure for social isolati...
Article
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Although men have a lower life expectancy than women, and are more susceptible to illness, they have been found to be less likely to engage in health‐seeking behaviour. Men's Sheds, as a gendered intervention, has been identified as an effective way to engage men in meaningful activity and gain social support from others. However, links between she...
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Governments move away from their roles as providers and take on roles as facilitators and enablers. Such transformations provide opportunities for individuals to play an active role in improving the resilience of their communities. However, the effects of such transformations may not be experienced by all communities equally. In the light of the em...
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In the transition from welfare to ‘enabling’ states, governments move away from their previous roles as providers of services. Individuals and communities as collectives of individuals are encouraged to play a more active role in improving their own wellbeing and resilience, thus shifting from dependence on the state to self-reliance. This proposed...
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In this paper, we argue that social enterprise could represent a means of tackling rural challenges of providing sustainable economic development, addressing the withdrawal of public services and promoting community cohesion. The paper draws upon a review of existing academic as well as policy literature and develops a conceptual framework that hel...
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This article explores a process meant to empower disadvantaged communities that have not previously engaged in government-instigated civic projects. Drawing on a large exploratory study of an empowerment project in seven Scottish rural communities, findings include that empowering communities should harness community development techniques that use...
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This paper focuses on ‘hard to reach’ communities with weak histories of engagement and it explores whether facilitated community interventions can empower and develop community resilience. Drawing on data from six communities, the paper indicates a need for tailored and context-specific support that matches local needs. Implementation of community...
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Purpose: This article aims to explore how nascent social businesses move beyond the incubation phase and it develops understanding of how early stage social businesses access finance to achieve growth. Design/methodology/approach: This exploratory and inductive study is based on four focus group discussions with early- stage social entrepreneurs, ‘...
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Communities are increasingly encouraged to become more resilient, be more active and proactive, adapt to economic and social transformation, and possess the ability to change. Many initiatives aim to enhance community resilience, however there are few effective measurement tools which identify the influence of these initiatives on the resilience of...
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This article considers whether, and if so how, rural communities can be supported, through a facilitated process, to create social enterprises within the field of health and care. Using results from the thematic analysis of four community case studies involved in a facilitated action-research process, the article identifies community capabilities a...
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This article considers whether, and if so how, rural communities can be supported, through a facilitated process, to create social enterprises within the field of health and care. Using results from the thematic analysis of four community case studies involved in a facilitated action research process, the article identifies community capabilities a...
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This article explores an understanding of the entrepreneurial behavior of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Poland, one of the emerging markets of the European Union, during the recent period of economic slowdown. It considers the role of accessibility to external financial resources in shaping decisions undertaken by such enterprises. The hyp...
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This paper explores the role of private sector enterprises in building the resilience of rural Scotland. In addition, the paper seeks to identify changes in rural enterprise activities and their impact on rural life. The paper is based on quantitative secondary data analysis and two qualitative case studies. These demonstrate how rural enterprises...
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Objectives: To examine whether the prevalence of regional and chronic widespread pain (CWP) varies with rurality and to determine the characteristics of persons in rural locations in whom pain is found to be in excess. Methods: Participants, aged ≥55 years, from participating general practices in seven different geographical locations in Scotland w...
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The economic importance of the private sector, such as its contribution to GDP or employment creation, is well recognised in research and policy. More recently, positive social and environmental contributions of businesses have been explored and there is a growing body of evidence recognising the potential role of private sector enterprises in cont...
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This paper explores the role of private sector enterprises in building the resilience of rural Scotland. In addition, the paper seeks to identify changes in rural enterprise activities and their impact on rural life. The paper is based on quantitative secondary data analysis and two qualitative case studies. These demonstrate how rural enterprises...
Article
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Enhancing inclusion and self-reliance at community level is gaining ground in policy terms, due - in part - to the need to increase the efficiency of public spend, associated with the global financial crisis. Within Scotland, this shift is manifested through multiple policy and community interventions seeking to enhance resilience of communities. M...
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Recent legislative and other policy-related developments seek to enhance local agenda-setting through empowered communities. However, community development is separated from community empowerment, thus implicitly supporting a more uncritical perspective of empowerment processes. In this article we: (1) focus on communities who do not engage; (2) id...
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Local participation in the provision of public services is increasingly encouraged in current UK public policy, representing potential for social innovation in service delivery. This paper describes the challenges and considers the role for social scientists in simultaneously supporting and researching social innovation. This paper critically refle...
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Recent public policies increasingly emphasize the role of communities in service co-production. Collaboration between the state and the public is frequently associated with social enterprise activities. However, the assumption that social enterprises can be successfully built and developed in remote and rural areas might be faulty. Current policy d...
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Involvement in community activities offers a route to achieving one of the five " essential elements " of older people's wellbeing as identified by McCormick et. al., (2009) – that of " having a role " , i.e. having a sense of purpose, belonging and value within society. This suggests that older people living within remote and rural communities wou...
Article
Full-text available
Involvement in community activities offers a route to achieving one of the five “essential elements” of older people’s wellbeing as identified by McCormick et. al., (2009) – that of “having a role”, i.e. having a sense of purpose, belonging and value within society. This suggests that older people living within remote and rural communities would de...
Article
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There is increasing interest in the social entrepreneur and the process of social entrepreneurship. This has led to criticisms of fuzziness surrounding these concepts. This paper explores the concept of the social entrepreneur, considering whether social entrepreneurs can really be termed "entrepreneurs" or if they are something else - individuals...
Article
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In the UK, like in other countries, current social policy exhibits a push towards using social enterprises to provide a range of services. Characteristics of rural locations might present a suitable nurturing ground for social enterprise; however, the nature of rurality also raises concerns. This paper considers promoters/barriers to growth of soci...
Article
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Recently there has been a boom in interest in the social entrepreneur and social entrepreneurship and increasingly social entrepreneurs and the organisations in which they are involved are perceived to play a significant role in contemporary society. The perceptions of policymakers are that the role of this sector could be even greater, particularl...
Article
Full-text available
Recently there has been a boom in interest in the social entrepreneur and social entrepreneurship and increasingly social entrepreneurs and the organisations in which they are involved are perceived to play a significant role in contemporary society. The perceptions of policymakers are that the role of this sector could be even greater, particularl...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
The Sheds for Sustainable Development Project focuses on supporting Men’s Sheds in Scotland to be both financially and socially sustainable. Key components include: the collection and analysis of data pertaining to the development challenges that sheds may face; the co-creation of viable solutions to help sheds develop and sustain; and the evaluation of the potential health and wellbeing benefits associated with being a member of a shed, and taking part in shed activities. The project has two key aims: To identify the key development challenges facing sheds and, through action research, implement entrepreneurial changes enhancing the sustainability and viability of the sheds; To explore, using mixed methods, the health and wellbeing impacts of shed activities on their users and how sheds may contribute to a preventative spending approach to health and care.
Project
The Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 aims to empower communities through the ownership of land and buildings and strengthening their voices in the decisions that matter most to them. Our project evaluated the impact of Participation Requests (Part 3) and Asset Transfer Requests(Part 5) parts of the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act which came into place in 2017. Our evaluation adopted a range of methods to collect primary data including in-depth interviews, participant observations and a focus group. Secondary data was mainly sourced through the collation of Participation Request and Asset Transfer Requests annual reports produced by relevant Public Sector Authorities. The evaluation aimed to verify: - Whether, how and to what extent, is Part 3 Part 5 of the Act being implemented as intended in the legislation and guidance? - To what extent does implementation of Part 5 of the Act result in more asset transfers being initiated and assets being transferred to community ownership, control and use, and with what potential contribution to improved access to transferred services and facilities? - To what extent does implementation of Part 3 of the Act improve the community–Public Authority engagement, dialogue and relationships, and with what potential contribution to improved public services? - What is the pattern of take up and use of part 3 and Part 5 of the Act among different community groups? What are the potential implications of these patterns for local inequalities of outcome? - Whether, how, and to what extent do communities feel more empowered as a result of the availability, take up and use of Part 3 and Part 5 of the Act?