Arnold Zwicky

Arnold Zwicky
Stanford University | SU

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96
Publications
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3,549
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
883 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150

Publications

Publications (96)
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Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society: General Session and Parasession on The Grammar of Event Structure (1991), pp. 252-266
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Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society: General Session Dedicated to the Contributions of Charles J. Fillmore (1994)
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Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society (1987), pp. 330-340
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Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society (1985), pp. 372-386
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Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society (1986), pp. 305-314
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This paper examines a short-lived innovation, quotative all, in real and apparent time. We used a two-pronged method to trace the trajectory of all over the past two decades: (i) Quantitative analyses of the quotative system of young Californians from different decades; this reveals a startling crossover pattern: in 1990/1994, all predominates, but...
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Six ways are surveyed in which a single phonological stem can correspond to material with different syntactic distributions, meanings, or uses: synchronically unsystematic identities of stems for different lexemes; three types of systematic grammatical relationships (zero derivation, alternative subcategories, and systematic subsenses); and two typ...
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Contains reports on one research project.
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Contains reports on seven research projects. National Science Foundation (Grant G-16526) National Institutes of Health (Grant MH-04737-03) U. S. Air Force (Electronics Systems Division) under Contract AF19(628)-2487
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abstract: this article presents,a synchronic,and,diachronic,investigation,of the lexeme,all in its intensifier and,quotative,functions. We delimit,the new,from,the old functions,of the lexeme,and present a variationist account,of all ’s external and internal constraints,in various,syntactic environments. our,analysis is based,on a variety of data s...
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Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Modern Languages. Thesis. 1965. Ph.D. Ph.D.
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this paperback edition updates the open research problems and records relevant results through pointers to the literature
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It has been proposed that there is a universal principle of grammar denying access to phonological information by syntactic rules (in English, the Principle of Phonology-Free Syntax). This paper examines three cases in French that appear to falsify this principle: (i) the claimed relevance of syllable count in describing the placement of attributiv...
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Spatial location and direction are expressed in French primarily by means of prepositional phrases involving three different prepositions:en, dans and à. Disregarding the usual collection of fixed expressions, lexical idiosyncrasies and subtle pragmatic and stylistic effects, the large generalisation about spatial PPs is that dans and a tend to be...
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The label CLITIC has been applied to a wide variety of phenomena, from words that are prosodically dependent on neighbouring words (as are unaccented monosyllabic prepositions and personal pronouns in English) to words, or even individual morphemes, with idiosyncratic syntactic distributions (like the second-position pronominal and adverbial partic...
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In a recent article in this journal, Roberts (1984) suggests a semantic method for distinguishing ambiguity and generality, a method which is intended to avoid the problems that others such as Zwicky and Sadock (1975), Hintikka (1973), and McCawley (1980) have found in making such a decision. Roberts claims that his test derives its validity from t...
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In existing monostratal phrase structure descriptions of the English passive, the construction is derived either by metarule or by lexical rule. Verbs that behave exceptionally with respect to the passive (like resemble and rumor) present difficulties for both types of analyses, as do passivized prepositional objects (as in This ocean has been sail...
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Wells and Local (1983) intend to propose a thoroughly pragmatics-based explanation for the unacceptability of certain instances of accented infinitival to, have, and be in English, in reaction to Zwicky and Levin's (1980) arguments for a constraint couched in syntactic terms. A comparison of the two accounts serves as the vehicle for a discussion o...
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Agreement and government can give rise to syntactic feature conflicts; e.g., a verb may have to agree in gender with a coördinate NP composed of NP's of differing genders. The resolution of such conflicts is to some extent determined by general semantic or syntactic principles ('principled resolution'). In addition, the existence of a governed or a...
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Determiners and adjectives in German agree with their head nouns in case, gender, and number. In addition, all adjectives have three paradigms of inflectional forms, which are traditionally called declensions: strong, weak, and mixed. Which declension an adjective occurs in depends on the determiner it combines with, a phenomenon traditionally call...
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textlessptextgreaterTypological and theoretical speculations about clitics require that the CLITIC be adequately distinguished from the INFLECTIONAL AFFIX on the one hand and from the INDEPENDENT WORD on the other. The first of these tasks has been attended to, but the second has been slighted, with the result that many items labeled 'particles' ha...
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Recent work on morphology – Lieber, 1981; Williams, 1981; Kiparsky, 1982; and Selkirk, 1982, in particular – has extended the notion of HEAD from syntax into new areas in morphology. In particular, these writers propose that in forms with derivational affixes, like English happiness, the affix is the head of the combination; for instance, Kiparsky...
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BothaRudolf P., The conduct of linguistic inquiry: a systematic introduction to the methodology of generative grammar. (Janua Linguarum, Series Practica 157.) The Hague: Mouton, 1981. Pp. xxii + 462. - Volume 21 Issue 1 - Arnold M. Zwicky
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The conclusion we draw from our extended discussion of the interesting descriptive problem Hetzron provides is that Somali offers no support to the view his paper defended: that syntax and phonology are partially intermingled domains. Merely letting the agreement rules of Somali have access to phonological properties of morphemes would not, in any...
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Two types of bound morphemes-clitics and inflectional affixes-are found attached to (free) words in many languages. At least six lines of evidence separate the clear cases on each side: the degree of selection between the dependent morpheme and the word to which it is attached; arbitrary lexical gaps; phonological idiosyncrasies; semantic idiosyncr...
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If the English informal style deletions (ISDs) illustrated in ((Are) you) going? are analyzed as the result of a (late) syntactic rule, theoretical embarrassments ensue concerning the relationship of syntax and phonology, the notion of surface structure, and the separation of cliticization from other syntax. But ISDs can delete proper parts of (pho...
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ParteeBarbara Hall, Fundamentals of mathematics for linguistics. Dordrecht and London: D. Reidel, and Stamford, Conn.: Greylock, 1978. Pp. xiii + 242. - Volume 19 Issue 1 - Arnold Zwicky
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The English infinitive marker to usually forms a phonological phrase with its following VP, but sometimes it is stranded from its VP and phrases instead with preceding material, as in I'd hate to. However, in some circumstances this reattachment is blocked: To is what I want. Speaker acceptability judgments and the distribution of stranded to in co...
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It has become customary for linguists (especially generative linguists) to draw a distinction (initially rather unnatural for philosophers of science) between “internal” and “external” evidence. Usually classified as internal are data on the cooccurrence and alternation of linguistic elements in some language, as well as such systemic consideration...
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Under the name of malapropisms, Fay and Cutler (1977) have examined a variety of speech error. However, malapropisms in the classical sense are not speech errors: they are what the speaker intended to say and would be willing to repeat. This paper analyzes 158 classical malapropisms in English. Though some probably result from imperfect learning, m...
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A special abstractness problem in generative grammar-that of intermediate derivational stages containing elements or sequences that are not well-formed as surface representations-is examined. Suspicious analyses employing such FALSE STEPS are cited from the phonological and syntactic literature. It is argued that false steps cannot be ruled out in...
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Linguistic analysis possesses both an ‘arbitrary’ and a ‘natural’ component – on the one hand, methodological principles and various means of organizing and handling data; on the other, empirical studies aimed at exposing linguistic universals through the detailed analysis of specific languages, cross-linguistic comparison, phonetic studies, psycho...
Conference Paper
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In several recent articles the issue of directionality in transformational grammar has been treated, rather unsatisfactorily to my mind. The question is this: are the relationships among the various levels of grammatical description (semantic structure, deep structure, surface structure, phonetic structure) such that certain levels are descriptivel...
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In Knuth [2] the problem of minimizing the number of sets of states required for his parsing algorithm is raised as an open question. We solve this problem by showing it is equivalent to that of finding the minimal representation for an incompletely ...
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their language. Things picked up considerably in the late 18th century, with Robert Lowth's Short Introduction to English Grammar (1762) a particularly influential volume. In the 19th and 20th centuries, the tremendous expansion of formal education and of occupations demanding facility with the written language drove a parallel expansion of the mar...
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published or submitted for publication not peer reviewed
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A solution to the analysis problem for a class of grammars appropriate to the description of natural languages is essential to any system which involves the automatic processing of natural language inputs for purposes of man-machine communication, translation, information retrieval, or data processing. The analysis procedure for transformational gr...

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