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Arno van der Hoeven

Arno van der Hoeven

PhD

About

24
Publications
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Citations
Introduction
I am Assistant Professor in the department of Media & Communication at Erasmus University Rotterdam. My research focuses on the contributions of media and culture to urban development. I am fascinated by the ways in which cultural forms such as popular music foster social relationships and meaningful engagements between people and their local environment. I have worked on various research projects that address these connections between place, culture and identity: 1) The places of live music: what is the impact of live music on cities? 2) Online urban heritage: how do participatory media change people’s engagement with the urban past? 3) Popular music heritage and nostalgia: how does popular music’s past support collective identities?

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
This paper seeks to understand the role of valuing in urban live music ecologies. It explains how multiple actors (e.g. directors of music venues, musicians, policy-makers, and real estate experts) in Dutch live music ecologies negotiate the different values of live music. To examine this dynamic, we use insights from literature on innovation ecosy...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose This paper sets out to compare different methodologies for measuring the value(s) of live popular music and to explore the different motivations amongst a range of organisations engaged in that work. Design/methodology/approach The authors analyse how the values of live music are measured, who does it and why. Based on this analysis the au...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the spatial value of live popular music by adopting an inter-disciplinary approach grounded in urban and music studies. What is understood of the relationship between live music and the built environment is improved, with a focus on how this cultural form contributes to performing, (re)developing and narrating urban spaces. The...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines how people value their historic urban landscapes through participatory heritage websites. These websites are online places where citizens actively contribute to the conservation of urban heritage. Taking UNESCO's 2011 Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape as its theoretical starting point, this study understands urban l...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, I address the call in UNESCO’s Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape to explore how communication technologies can be used to conserve urban heritage. To date, the relevance of social media for the implementation of this recommendation has received little attention. This is surprising, because city oriented social media plat...
Article
Full-text available
Popmuziek speelt een belangrijke rol in de aantrekkelijkheid van onze steden. Gezien de dynamiek van zowel stedelijke ontwikkeling als de muziekindustrie verandert die rol in rap tempo. In dit artikel geeft het onderzoeksteam POPLIVE een inkijk in hun onderzoeksproject naar duurzame livemuziekecologieën voor Nederlandse steden.
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents an overview of the social and cultural values attributed to live music ecologies in urban environments. It is grounded in a qualitative content analysis of live music reports and strategies from Australia, the United States, South Africa, Canada, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Scotland and the Netherlands. Contributing to the emer...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the changing roles of heritage professionals by focusing on the participatory practices of intangible urban heritage. Developments towards democratisation in the heritage sector led to a growing expectation that heritage professionals would work with local publics. This democratisation is manifested in (1) the use of digital med...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents the different ways in which online media can foster public engagement with urban heritage. It also discusses the societal benefits of participatory heritage websites and provides recommendations on how such online heritage projects can be designed effectively. In so doing, the report targets people who want to learn how online...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores the phenomenon of popular music nostalgia. In the cultural and heritage industries, nostalgia is widely used to make an affective connection to music consumers. Popular music nostalgia can be defined as a longing for the past that is evoked through popular music’s production and consumption or representations of its history an...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the relationship between popular music, memory and cultural identity. It draws upon narrative approaches to memory and identity in order to explore how engagement with music from the past can both afford and constrain identity construction. On the basis of in-depth interviews with, among others, heritage practitioners and audi...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter examines how the mediatization of cultural heritage enables people to participate in the conservation of the urban past. The ways in which mediatization fosters public involvement in urban heritage conservation will be explored by focusing on three developments: the digitization of heritage collections, the growing attention paid to au...
Article
Full-text available
On the basis of interviews with music audiences, heritage practitioners, and cultural industry workers, this article explores how language use in Dutch popular music relates to local and historically situated taste patterns and music practices. Most popular music in the Netherlands is sung in English, Dutch, or dialects of the Dutch language. We di...
Article
Through the prism of popular music, this article examines how the preservation and display of this global cultural form positions itself at the nexus of the local and the global, and in so doing mediates attachment to place. Springing from the increasing cultural legitimacy of popular music and the growing participation of fans and local communitie...
Book
Full-text available
Ever since the late 1950s, people have grown up with popular music as an important element of their daily lives. This dissertation explores the connections between popular music memories, cultural identity and cultural heritage, looking at the different ways in which popular music is remembered and evokes memories. In so doing, the dissertation exa...
Article
Full-text available
Following the increasing attention paid to popular music in heritage discourses, this article explores how the popular music culture from the 1960s is remembered in Europe. I discuss the role of heritage organizations, media and the cultural policy of the EU in the construction of a popular music heritage of this period. Furthermore, I examine the...
Article
Full-text available
Following the popularisation of dance music in the 1990s, and the consolidation of disc jockeys (DJs) as global stars, this article examines the attachment of music audiences to this decade by examining the popular flashback dance parties held in the Netherlands. By drawing on theories of cultural heritage, memory and nostalgia, this article explor...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores how cultural identities are negotiated in relation to the heritage of illegal radio in the Netherlands. The term ‘pirate radio’ commonly refers to the offshore radio stations that were broadcasting during the 1960s. These stations introduced commercial radio and popular music genres like beat music, which were not played by pu...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
Ever since the late 1950s, people have grown up with popular music as an important element of their daily lives. In my dissertation I explored the connections between popular music memories, cultural identity and cultural heritage, looking at the different ways in which popular music is remembered and evokes memories. In so doing, the dissertation examined the various memory practices of the cultural and heritage industries, ranging from the bottom-up activities of music preservation by fans to institutional forms of popular music heritage in museums. The studies presented in this work draw on interviews with heritage practitioners, cultural industry workers and music audiences. The research reveals the meanings of popular music memories for the cultural identities of individuals and communities. It also demonstrates how these memories enable a sense of self and identity and time and place.
Project
The popular music industry is slowly changing its focus from recorded music to live music revenues. Also, musicians increasingly depend on live concerts to earn a living. These developments have consequences for live music ecologies, i.e. the live music sector as a (inter)local network of different social actors (e.g. musicians, bookers and policy makers) as well as materialities (e.g. venues size, festivals, urban setting). First, for musicians in a precarious labour market, a performance based business model requires an extended and changing skill-set. Second, fixed pop venues experience increasing competition from new and often temporary stages, like festivals and popup locations. Third, live music industries are increasingly expected by local governments to have economic and sociocultural benefits. In short, sustaining popular music as a viable creative industry requires strong local music ecologies that add economic, cultural and social value for various stakeholders. We will research how local live music ecologies can contribute to value creation in the careers of pop musicians, the position of music venues and festivals, and the local (urban) society in general. On the maker level we focus on the position of musicians and the role of live music ecologies in skill and talent development. On the level of music venues and festivals we concentrate on how to find a balance between structural and temporary live music infrastructure, which caters for diverse audiences. On the societal level we focus on the value of live music ecologies for cities.
Archived project
Participatory heritage websites (e.g. city blogs, local Facebook groups, and memory websites) give access to the heritage of cities. In so doing, these websites enhance the public’s engagement with urban heritage. This project explores the sociocultural values of online urban heritage initiatives, compares them, and examines what they tell us about the ways in which people experience urban heritage in their everyday lives. To this end, I use a media studies perspective to contribute to the emerging literature on historic urban landscapes.