Arne W Lehmann

Arne W Lehmann

Dr. rer. nat.

About

62
Publications
15,030
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1,020
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 1998 - September 1999
University of Western Australia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 1994 - September 1998
Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (62)
Article
Full-text available
Today, integrative taxonomy is often considered the gold standard when it comes to species recognition and delimitation. Using the Tetrix bipunctata complex, we here present a case where even integrative tax-onomy may reach its limits. The Tetrix bipunctata complex consists of two morphs, bipunctata and kraussi, which are easily distinguished by a...
Article
We adopt an allometric framework of scaling relationships for comparison between mating-related traits in the middle European bushcricket Roeseliana roeselii (Hagenbach, 1822). Eight characters, covering ontogenetic fitness (size traits; fixed at final moult), male condition (mass traits) and mating motivation (reproductive behaviours), were analys...
Article
Full-text available
1. Functional wing polymorphism in insects is an intriguing topic, especially with respect to the adaptive advantage of each wing morph. The common pygmy grasshopper in Germany, Tetrix subulata, displays wing polymorphism skewed towards macropterous (LW) individuals capable of flight. Furthermore, T. subulata is known to undergo adult diapause in w...
Article
Full-text available
The data in the Table 1 of the original version of this article were inadvertently shifted during the editing process. Therefore the entries as published in this table did not correspond to their correct data.
Article
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The possession of wings and ability to fly are a unifying character of higher insects, but secondary loss of wings is widespread. Within the bushcrickets, the subfamily Phaneropterinae (Orthoptera: Tettigonioidea) comprises more than 2000 predominantly long-winged species in the tropics. However, the roughly 300 European representatives are mainly...
Article
Full-text available
Animal genitalia are diverse and a growing body of evidence suggests that they evolve rapidly under post-copulatory sexual selection. This process is predicted to be more intense in polyandrous species, although there have been very few comparative studies of the relationship between the complexity of genital structures in males and measures of the...
Article
Full-text available
Nuptial gifts are male mating investments, which, in bushcrickets, comprise the sperm-containing ampulla and the attached spermatophylax. The functions of the spermatophylax are to deter females from premature removal of the sperm-containing ampulla, which is a nutrient resource for females, as well as a source of compounds that influence female be...
Article
Full-text available
In a recently published paper on colour polymorphism in a Pygmy grasshopper from China (Zhao et al 2016) an unidentified Paratettix sp. was misidentified as Tetrix bolivari. This case highlights the need for correct species identification and provides an opportunity to recommend some aspects of Good Taxonomic Practice (GTP) in Tetrigidae to reduce...
Article
Full-text available
We present a DNA barcoding study on the insect order Orthoptera that was generated in collaboration between four barcoding projects in three countries, viz. Barcoding Fauna Bavarica (Germany), German Barcode of Life, Austrian Barcode of Life, and Swiss Barcode of Life. Our dataset includes 748 COI sequences from 127 of the 162 taxa (78.4%) recorded...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
It is believed that animal genitalia evolve rapidly under sexual selection. Males develop sclerotised copulatory organs in various bushcricket families. Across species these titillators exhibit a great variability like seen in other genital structures. Additional mating traits like refractory period and polyandry are also very different in bushcric...
Poster
Full-text available
Our result cannot support the hypothesis of postcopulatory sexual selection being a driver for male bushcricket genitalia evolution.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Animal genitalia are believed to evolve rapidly under sexual selection. In some bushcricket families, males possess sclerotised copulatory organs. Like other genitalic structures, these bushcricket titillators show considerable variation across species. Bushcrickets also vary widely in mating traits like polyandry and refractory period...
Article
Full-text available
Providing nutritional gifts to females during mating is common in several insect species. Although nuptial gifts are well known in the bushcrickets, the specific way in which females use spermatophore material is unclear. In previous research, we found that a portion of the spermatophore is used for body homeostasis in the hours following mating. O...
Article
Full-text available
Lehmann, A.W. Klatt, R., Landeck, I., Machatzi, B., Hennigs, S., Brauner, O., Oldorff, S. & Lehmann, G.U.C. (2016): Fokusarten für die Erfassung zur Gefährdungsanalyse der Heuschrecken (Orthoptera) in Brandenburg und Berlin. Articulata 31: 23-44.
Book
Full-text available
Dieser Bestimmungsschlüssel beschreibt alle Libellenarten in Nord- und Mitteleuropa. Um die Ausbreitung der Arten aufgrund der Klimaerwärmung abzubilden, wurde der Schlüssel auf Nord-Spanien, Nord-Italien und die istrische Halbinsel erweitert. Er umfasst nun 115 Arten und Unterarten, die in kurzen Abschnitten mit ihren wichtigsten Merkmalen, Verbre...
Article
Full-text available
Genitalia are rapidly evolving morphological structures most likely under sexual selection. Due to their internal nature they are often hidden inside the body, thus morpho-functional studies of animal genitalia are broadly lacking. Males of some bushcricket taxa bear paired genital appendices called titillators, the exact function of which is unkno...
Article
Full-text available
Dimorphism in wing length is well known in many insect species. In those species a trade-off exists between dispersal capability and reproduction, with the long-winged (LW) morph being a better disperser due to superior flight capability. The short-winged (SW) morph is less mobile and it is hypothesised that females of this morph can invest more en...
Article
Full-text available
Acoustic emissions of animals serve communicative purposes and most often contain species-specific and individual information exploitable to listeners, rendering bioacoustics a valuable tool for biodiversity monitoring. Recording bioacoustic signals allows reproducible species identification. There is a great need for increased use and further deve...
Article
Full-text available
Collections of Pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrigidae) and Tridactylidae were made on expeditions to Jordan in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012. This country is predomi- nated in great parts by arid and semi-arid habitats, mostly stony deserts. The col- lections contain a single Tridactylidae species (Xya pfaendleri) and three Tetrigi- dae species (Paratettix mer...
Article
Full-text available
In Tettigoniidae (Orthoptera: Ensifera), hearing organs are essential in mate detection. Male tettigoniids usually produce calling songs by tegminal stridulation, whereas females approach the males phonotactically. This unidirectional communication system is the most common one among tettigoniids. In several tettigoniid lineages, females have evolv...
Article
Full-text available
We used molecular characters to infer the phylogenetic position of the Western Mediterranean bushcricket genus Odontura and to trace its high karyo-type diversity. Analysis of 1391 base pairs of two mitochondrial genes (COI and ND1) and one nuclear sequence (ITS2) was conducted. Phylogenetic topologies were estimated using maximum parsimony, maximu...
Article
Full-text available
We used molecular characters to infer the phylogenetic position of the Western Mediterranean bushcricket genus Odontura and to trace its high karyotype diversity. Analysis of 1391 base pairs of two mitochondrial genes (COI and ND1) and one nuclear sequence (ITS2) was conducted. Phylogenetic topologies were estimated using maximum parsimony, maximum...
Article
Full-text available
The cytogenetic characteristics of 17 species of bushcricket belonging to eight genera of the tribe Barbitistini were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with 18S rDNA and (TTAGGn) telomeric as probes and by C-banding, silver, and fluorochrome staining. These markers were used to understand chromosomal organization and evolutionary relat...
Article
Full-text available
Dimorphism in wing length is well known in many insect species. It is generally believed that a trade-off between dispersal and reproduction exists, with the long-winged (LW) morph being a better disperser due to its superior flight capability. The short-winged (SW) morph is less mobile and it is hypothesised that females of this morph invest more...
Article
Full-text available
The auditory sense organ of Tettigoniidae (Insecta, Orthoptera) is located in the foreleg tibia and consists of scolopidial sensilla which form a row termed crista acustica. The crista acustica is associated with the tympana and the auditory trachea. This ear is a highly ordered, tonotopic sensory system. As the neuroanatomy of the crista acustica...
Article
Full-text available
Copulation duration varies considerably across species, but few comparative studies have examined factors that might underlie such variation. We examined the relationship between copulation duration (prior to spermatophore transfer), the complexity of titillators (sclerotized male genital contact structures), spermatophore mass and male body mass a...
Article
Full-text available
Chromosomes of the males of five species of Odontura, belonging to the subgenera Odontura and Odonturella, were analyzed. Intensive evolution of the karyotype was recorded, both in terms of changes in the numbers of chromosomes (from 2n = 31 to 27) and the sex chromosome system (from X0 to neo-XY and X0 to neo-X1X2Y). Karyotype evolution was accomp...
Article
Full-text available
Parthenogenesis in bushcrickets has an incidence of less than 1%. In the diploid bushcricket Poecilimon intermedius, rearing indicates obligate, thelytokous parthenogenesis. Antibiotic treatment of P. intermedius was not effective in restoring male production, and negative results from PCR screening excluded feminizing endosymbionts, such as Wolbac...
Article
Full-text available
Lehmann, A.W. & Landeck, I. (2011): Erstfund der Kurzflügel-Dornschrecke Tetrix kraussi SAULCY, 1888 im Land Brandenburg (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae). Märkische Ent. Nachr. 13 (2): 227-232.
Article
Parthenogenesis in bushcrickets has an incidence of less than 1%. In the diploid bushcricket Poecilimon intermedius, rearing indicates obligate, thelytokous parthenogenesis. Antibiotic treatment of P. intermedius was not effective in restoring male production, and negative results from PCR screening excluded feminizing endosymbionts, such as Wolbac...
Article
Full-text available
Reduction of tympanal hearing organs is repeatedly found amongst insects and is associated with weakened selection for hearing. There is also an associated wing reduction, since flight is no longer required to evade bats. Wing reduction may also affect sound production. Here, the auditory system in four silent grasshopper species belonging to the P...
Article
Male bush-crickets transfer a substantial spermatophore to females during copulation. The spermatophore comprises a large spermatophylax and a sperm-containing ampulla which is consumed by the female while the ejaculate transfers into her. Spermatophores are costly to produce and investment trade-offs are expected to occur between the ejaculate, sp...
Article
Full-text available
Male bush-crickets transfer a substantial spermatophore to females during copulation. The spermatophore comprises a large spermatophylax and a sperm-containing ampulla which is consumed by the female while the ejaculate transfers into her. Spermatophores are costly to produce and investment trade-offs are expected to occur between the ejaculate, sp...
Article
Full-text available
During mating, male bushcrickets transfer a spermatophore that consists of a sperm-containing ampulla and a product of the accessory glands, the spermatophylax, which females directly ingest. In the present study, we demonstrate male spermatophore allocation in the bushcricket Poecilimon zimmeri. Males of this species show condition-dependent sperm...
Article
Full-text available
During mating, male insects of certain species transfer a costly nuptial gift, a large spermatophore, which is eaten by the female as sperm transfer into her. The spermatophore components (the sperm-free spermatophylax and the sperm ampulla) vary greatly in size between species, and have a direct influence on male fitness. Studies of the relationsh...
Article
Full-text available
We analyzed geographical variation in body size in males and females of nine Greek populations of the bushcricket Poecilimon thessalicus Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1891. We found significant geographic variability in P. thessalicus, with all three morphometric body-size characters (hind femur, front tibia, and pronotum) highly correlated within populat...
Article
Full-text available
During mating, male insects of certain species transfer a costly nuptial gift, a large spermatophore, which is eaten by the female as sperm transfer into her. The spermatophore components (the sperm-free spermatophylax and the sperm ampulla) vary greatly in size between species, and have a direct influence on male fitness. Studies of the relationsh...
Article
Full-text available
Bushcricket males of Poecilimon zimmeri transfer large and protein-rich spermatophores during mating, which females directly ingest. There is correlational evidence that heavier males transfer larger nuptial gifts. In no-choice mating trials, females mated randomly with respect to male’s body weight. In contrast, in two-choice mating trials, female...
Article
We analyzed geographical variation in body size in males and females of nine Greek populations of the bushcricket Poecilimon thessalicus Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1891. We found significant geographic variability in P. thessalicus, with all three morphometric body-size characters (hind femur, front tibia, and pronotum) highly correlated within populat...
Article
Full-text available
Animals of many species prefer some partners over others. Discriminating among potential mates causes strong sexual selection that shapes characters and behaviors. In bushcrickets the sexes shows different latencies to remate due to differences in investment in production of the nuptial gift by males and the induced refractory period in females.We...
Article
Full-text available
Poecilimon gerlindae spec. nov. from Greek mainland is described. The new species is the eight known member of the P. propinquus-group (sensu Lehmann AW 1998). It is distinct with respect to male cerci, the corresponding female basal fold, body colouration, number of teeth on the stridulatory file and the number of pulses in the song. Otherwise it...
Article
Full-text available
Males of the bushcricket Poecilimon mariannae are parasitized by the acoustically orienting fly Therobia leonidei. Developing fly larvae reduce male bushcricket survival and reproductive effort. We estimated potential lifetime reproductive success [PLRS] of male bushcrickets to investigate the likely costs of this parasitism. Our analysis explored...
Article
Full-text available
In many animals, males [MM] possess traits that increase their attractiveness to females [FF]. Their signals, however, can also increase conspicuousness to predators. In the bushcricket Poecilimon thessalicus Brunner von Wattenwyl 1891, MM are attacked by the parasitoid ormiine fly Therobia leonidei (Mesnil 1965) that locate them through their call...
Article
In many animals, males [MM] possess traits that increase their attractiveness to females [FF]. Their signals, however, can also increase conspicuousness to predators. In the bushcricket Poecilimon thessalicus Brunner von Wattenwyl 1891, MM are attacked by the parasitoid ormiine fly Therobia leonidei (Mesnil 1965) that locate them through their call...
Article
Full-text available
Following mating, female bushcrickets undergo a refractory period during which they are sexually unreceptive. The length of the refractory period correlates with the size of the spermatophylax. However, the size of the nuptial gift of acoustically signalling bushcrickets is often reduced as a result of infections by parasitoid flies. We examined th...
Article
Full-text available
Male bushcrickets provide females with a nuptial gift, a spermatophore, which is transferred to females at mating. The spermatophore consists of a gelatinous mass, the spermatophylax, and the sperm-containing ampulla. Male spermatophore size is positively correlated with insemination rate and female refractory period and therefore with male reprodu...
Article
Male bushcrickets provide females with a nuptial gift, a spermatophore, which is transferred to females at mating. The spermatophore consists of a gelatinous mass, the spermatophylax, and the sperm-containing ampulla. Male spermatophore size is positively correlated with insemination rate and female refractory period and therefore with male reprodu...
Article
Full-text available
Cytotaxonomic analysis of 20 species and subspecies of the genus Poecilimon using C-banding pattern, chiasma frequency, and morphometric characteristics of the chromosomes were described. Using a cladistic analysis the chromosome data provided a basis to produce a phylogenetic tree which was compared with a tree based on morphological characters an...

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