Arlette David

Arlette David
Hebrew University of Jerusalem | HUJI · Institute of Archaeology

PhD

About

30
Publications
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Introduction
Arlette David currently works at the Institute of Archaeology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Arlette does research in ancient Egyptian Semantics, Discourse Analysis, and History of Art. Her current project concerns Amarna iconography.

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
This paper presents new and revised assemblages of Akhenaten's Karnak reliefs from the Rudjmenu depicting the purification, offering, and theogamy rituals of Akhenaten and Nefertiti, and explores their relation to the Daily Temple Ritual of Amun in Karnak
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https://www.mdpi.com/2673-9461/1/1/4/htm The paper presents a study of the context, functions, and rationale behind architectural replicas sealed off in ancient Egyptian tombs, the finest exemplars of which having been excavated in the Theban tomb of Meketre (ca. 2000 B.C.). The analysis is preceded by clarifications regarding the terminology used,...
Article
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Please click on the DOI link above for the full open access version. Ancient Lachish (Tell ed-Duweir) in southern Israel is a key site for understanding the Canaanite cultures of the Middle and Late Bronze Ages and the Kingdom of Judah in the Iron Age of the Levant. It has been intensively excavated since 1932 by a number of entities. This article...
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The “Window of Appearance” of the Egyptian New Kingdom royal palace is usually considered an indigenous architectural element. After a review of this assumption, it is suggested that it had been observed by emissaries of Amenhotep III in the Cretan palace of Knossos before the concept was imported to the Egyptian court. The Cretan context and commu...
Book
Renewing Royal Imagery: Akhenaten and Family in the Amarna Tombs offers a systematic, in-depth analysis of the visual presentation of ancient Egyptian kingship during Akhenaten's reign (circa 1350 B.C.) in the elite tombs of his new capital, domain of his god Aten, and attempts to answer two basic questions: how can Amarna imagery look so blatantly...
Article
Amarna iconography, the visual repertoire conceived in the domain Akhenaten built for his god Aten around 1350 BC, abounds with gestures of affectionate familiarity between the members of the royal family. The apparent lack of decorum in the royal imagery is intriguing, the 'touchy-feely' displays of tenderness between the royal couple and the prin...
Article
Tel Reḥov, identified with Reḥob, was one of the largest Canaanite cities in the southern Levant during the Late Bronze Age (15th–13th centuries b.c.e.). Unlike many other Canaanite settlements, the city was founded in the 15th century after a hiatus beginning in Early Bronze Age III. In this article, four major Late Bronze Age occupation strata ar...
Article
Prompted by the discovery of a schematic uninscribed amethyst scarab at Tel Abel Beth Maacah in the Upper Galilee, an overview of such scarabs found in the southern Levant is provided, with a typological analysis and a tentative dating and origin of these pieces. © 2019 American Schools of Oriental Research. 0003-097X/2019/381-004$10.00. All rights...
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An article about a Middle Bronze Age IIB burial from Area B at Tel Abel Beth Maacah, published in the festschrift honoring Prof. Aren Maier : Tell it in Gath. Studies in the History and Archaeology of Israel Essays in Honor of Aren M. Maeir on the Occasion of his Sixtieth Birthday. The article describes the burial and its goods, which included a br...
Article
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This study of royal gestures and postures in the Amarna private tombs' iconography aims at characterizing and interpreting royal nonverbal communication during Akhenaten's reign. Akhenaten's imagery is a selective repertoire of movements, each of special significance in its iconographic context, as opposed to the vast range of movements in real lif...
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A few representations of a divine couple enthroned, the female figure sitting in the lap of the male, have survived in Mesopotamian iconography, on terracotta and stone plaques, on the Ur-Namma stela from Ur, and on a Syrian cylinder seal of the 19th-18th centuries BCE. In Egypt, the motif is mostly restricted to the reign of Akhenaten, with a few...
Article
One of the typical images of Atenist iconography involves Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten extending the ‘bз/sḫm/ḫrp/ḥw-‘ scepter in the light of Aten, near offerings; known from various contexts in Karnak and Amarna, it flourishes in all phases of his reign. The ritual scene is traditionally characterized as a “consecration of offerings” modeled on similar...
Article
During excavations at Tell Abil el-Qameḥ, identified as the biblical Abel Beth Maacah and located in the Upper Galilee on the modern border between Israel, Lebanon and Syria, a high-quality Mnḫprrꜥ scarab was found in an Iron Age I context, just above substantial Late Bronze IIB remains. Its typology suggests it to be a product from the reign of Ra...
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The site of Beth Shean has revealed an intriguing case of linguistic familiarity and exchange between the New Kingdom Egyptian occupants and the Semitic populations in their own land: the knowledge of the Semitic pattern of divine incomparability [mî + kā + divine name] by the Egyptian authorities is evinced by the way they used it on the first Bet...
Article
Full-text available
During excavations at Tell Abil el-Qameḥ, identified as the biblical Abel Beth Maacah and located in the Upper Galilee on the modern border between Israel, Lebanon and Syria, a high-quality Mnxprra scarab was found in an Iron Age I context, just above substantial Late Bronze IIB remains. Its typology suggests it to be a product from the reign of Ra...
Article
Full-text available
Many scenes that appear in tombs have been literally interpreted as offering a representation of daily life for the enjoyment of the tomb’s owner, to provide sustenance for his ka, and to emphasize his social status. But the tomb’s decoration is a multi-layered construct, both practical and symbolic, and the details of the scenes, their context, an...
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A golden inlaid rosette found in the royal tomb of Qatna and dated to the 15th-14th century BC sheds light on the evolution of the Egyptian rosette during Dynasty 18 and on patterns of artistic exchanges between Near Eastern and Egyptian artists. Since cloisonné technique is uncommon in second millennium BCE pieces of jewelry from Western Asia, the...
Article
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History of legal identification in Pre-Demotic Egypt: proper name and other identification elements such as honorifics, filiation, kinship or alliance, occupation, social status epithets, and origin in private law deeds and court proceedings/mediation from the Old Kingdom to the Ramesside Period
Chapter
In its general meaning of legal system or legal norms, the law of Pharaonic Egypt, from the Old Kingdom to pre-Demotic Egypt, in principle originated from the royal persona in times of strong central government: the monarch embodied all the powers of the state through holding a divine office. His word was recorded in decrees with normative value; h...
Article
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The evolution of the lexeme nmh, 'orphan', 'person of inferior status', and its classification in texts up to the New Kingdom, is examined. The classifier, and the category it represents, is discussed. A literary example of a typical nmh avant la lettre is offered.
Article
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The paper examines four types of scenes where a dominating pharaoh interacts with a subdued enemy (smiting, trampling, immobilizing, and devouring the enemy); it proposes a lexical expression for the scene, observing its categorization into a specific semantic field through the classifiers of the script, studies the metaphors underlying the iconogr...
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The "Naunakhte" file (Dynasty 20) contains testamentary provisions authenticated by a court and various documents related to the succession of Mrs. Naunakhte; its study enables to define the linguistic register of a testament during the Ramesside Period by observing its structural, syntactic, and lexical characteristics, and by comparing them with...
Article
Full-text available
The present paper endeavors to throw light on ancient Egyptian legal categories and metaphors with the help of the hieroglyphic script classifiers, as these classifiers graphically reveal the semantic categories according to which the Egyptians comprehended legal concepts. The research is centred on two common classifiers used in the legal lexicon...
Article
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L'analyse des discours juridiques modernes et plus particulièrement de ceux rencontrés dans le genre législatif, puisqu'il s'agit du genre qui nous intéresse ici, a été pratiquée notamment par Mellinkoff (1963), Crystal & Davy (1969), Danet (1980, 1984, 1985, 1990), Charrow, Crandall & Charrow (1982), Gunnarsson (1984), Gustafsson (1984), Kurzon (1...

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Projects (4)
Archived project
Project
A prominent multi-layered site located on the modern border between Israel, Lebanon and Syria, with remains dating to the second and first millennium BCE. The town was mentioned in the Bible and in several second millennium BCE Egyptian sources. Excavations are being conducted at the tell since 2013, revealing important remains from the Bronze and Iron Ages, including an intensive Iron Age I sequence unprecedented in that region.