Aris Mousoutzanis

Aris Mousoutzanis
University of Brighton · Film & Screen Studies

B.A. M.A. Ph.D.

About

21
Publications
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22
Citations
Introduction
Aris Mousoutzanis is a Prinicipal Lecturer in Film & Screen Studies at the University of Brighton. His areas of research include: speculative genre (science fiction, Gothic/horror, utopia/dystopia, (post-)apocalypse); screen media, trauma theory and memory studies; imperialism, (post-)colonialism, globalisation and the media. Curent work includes a project on utopia and biopower and one on media and nostalgia

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
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Article
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Critical discussions on fictions of the 'double' tend to follow theoretical trajectories that rely on theories such as psychoanalysis and Freud's concept of the uncanny, postmodern theory and Baudrillard's concept of the simulacrum, or on cultural theories of identity and representation that view the double as a metaphor for the marginalised Other....
Article
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The article urges for further attention to representations of childhood in (post-)apocalyptic fictions from the perspective of biopolitical theory, by focusing on two recent television series, Utopia (UK, Channel 4, 2013-15) and The 100 (US, The CW, 2014-present). The apocalypse is discussed as a quintessentially biopolitical narrative about the ex...
Chapter
There has been a trend for introductory texts on science fiction (SF) criticism to start by announcing that SF is now an increasingly respected genre within academia, with its own canonical texts, major scholars, historical traditions, and theoretical perspectives. An increasing influx of publications, conferences, academic courses at both undergra...
Article
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This article discusses the BBC drama Taboo (2017-present) as a contemporary example of imperial Gothic and places the series in the context of a current trend of ‘imperial nostalgia’ in British culture. It provides a close reading of the series with regard to its use of gothic traits like the exploration of morbid psychology, the function of the gh...
Article
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This paper applies theories of biopolitics and biopower within the discipline of utopian studies. The paper concentrates on the ways in which theorizsations of biopower expose the mechanics of utopian discourses, formations, practices, and texts. During modernity, utopianism demonstrated an increasing preoccupation with issues and concerns pertinen...
Article
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The paper suggests that the increasing proliferation of network fictions in literature, film, television and the internet may be interpreted through a theoretical framework that reconceptuallises the originally strictly psychoanalytic concept of the Unheimlich (Freud’s idea of the ‘unhomely’ or ‘uncanny’) within the context of political, economic a...
Book
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This collection of essays examines the relationship between the media and cosmopolitanism in an increasingly fragmented and globalizing world. This relationship is presented from multiple perspectives and the essays cover, amongst other themes, cosmopolitanization in everyday life, the mediation of suffering, trauma studies, and researching cosmopo...
Book
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Fin-de-Siècle Fictions, 1890s- 1990s focuses on fin-de-siècle British and postmodern American fictions of apocalypse and investigates the ways in which these narratives demonstrate shifts in the relations among modern discourses of power and knowledge.
Chapter
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One of the major sources of apocalyptic speculation in science fi ction (SF) writing in the postmillennial era has been the idea of the technological singularity, a term referring to a moment in the future when the acceleration in technological advance will reach a state where prediction of future developments of both humans and machines will no lo...
Book
This interdisciplinary collection of essays focuses on critical and theoretical responses to the apocalypse of the late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century cultural production. Examining the ways in which apocalyptic discourses have had an impact on how we read the world’s globalised space, the traumatic burden of history, and the mutual rela...
Article
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While the world as we know it has never been free of confl ict, pandemics, or natural disasters, such events have been recurrently read as apocalyptic, which, to refer to the two principal meanings of the word apocalypse, refl ect the perception of such climactic events both as terminal (e.g., pointing to the end) and revelatory (e.g., disclosing s...
Article
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The article explores the ways in which recent American sf film and television have participated in the wider interest in the topics of human memory and psychological trauma. The engagement with these topics in sf films and television shows has concentrated on their status in the midst of the information revolution. The return of traumatic memories...
Article
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Michael Cunningham’s most recent novel, Specimen Days, was bound to be compared to his previous work, The Hours. Reviewers and readers alike could easily identify the numerous similarities between the two texts: both novels were made up of three narratives set at different historical periods but with very similar if not related characters and theme...

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