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Arina Khatsenovich

Arina Khatsenovich
Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography SB RAS, Russia · Digital lab

PhD

About

77
Publications
14,708
Reads
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308
Citations
Citations since 2017
58 Research Items
295 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Additional affiliations
Education
September 2006 - June 2011
Novosibirsk State University
Field of study
  • Archaeology and History

Publications

Publications (77)
Article
Full-text available
Throughout the arid lands of Africa and Eurasia, camelids facilitated the expansion of human populations into areas that would not likely have been habitable without the transportation abilities of this animal along with the organic resources it provides, including dung, meat, milk, leather, wool, and bones. The two-humped, Bactrian, species of Cam...
Article
Full-text available
Here, we present initial results of a new course of research being carried out at the Moiltyn-am, Orkhon-1, and Orkhon-7 Paleolithic sites in the Orkhon River Valley, central Mongolia. Our research focuses on the Moiltyn-am site, which preserves a cultural and chronological sequence from the Final Middle to the Late Upper Paleolithic. Results from...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the acquisition and transport of rare or “exotic” raw materials in the Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP). A recently discovered perforated muscovite (mica) flakelet at the Kharganyn Gol 5 site in the middle Selenga Basin of Mongolia raises the question of how far ancient humans ranged to access this material. Here, we present th...
Article
Full-text available
Situated on the eastern periphery of Central Asia, Mongolia was a potentially important pathway for the migration of paleopopulations from the west to the east (and/or vice versa). Possible scenarios for the dispersal of ancient human populations in Mongolia are much more complicated than we initially supposed, due to the limited number of corridor...
Article
This article examines the formation processes of combustion features at the Orkhon 7 Paleolithic site in central Mongolia, employing a new multifaceted approach that combines spatial analysis with computer learning and micro-charcoal analysis. We analyzed material from excavations conducted in the 1980s (Archaeological Horizon 3 in Pits 2 and 3) an...
Article
Full-text available
Central Asia is positioned at a crossroads linking several zones important to hominin dispersal during the Middle Pleistocene. However, the scarcity of stratified and dated archaeological material and paleoclimate records makes it difficult to understand dispersal and occupation dynamics during this time period, especially in arid zones. Here we co...
Article
Full-text available
Beginning in the Middle Palaeolithic, human populations penetrated areas of Central Asia that are today characterised by extremely arid conditions. Mongolia's Gobi Desert comprises one such region. Tsagaan Agui Cave presents an example of the later Pleistocene occupation of this area, containing stratified evidence of diachronic, intense human and...
Article
Northern Mongolia and southwest Transbaikalia, encompassing the Selenga River Basin, constitute the geographical core of the earliest known Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) laminar industries. Comparison of the broad spectrum of criteria presented here allows reconstructing variability within these IUP industries, determining regional traits in sett...
Article
Upper Palaeolithic microlithic complexes in Northeast Asia are usually included in the spectrum of non-geometric industries. Mongolia, which is considered a possible crossroads of Middle and Upper Paleolithic migration routes due to its environmental and geographic conditions, is the only exception in this vast region. The Tolbor cluster of sites i...
Article
The article considers the lithic assemblage of archaeological horizon 4a of Tolbor 4 site in Northern Mongolia (excavation campaign of 2017) in the context of development of Early Upper Paleolithic lithic industries during MIS-3 stage. On the basis of radiocarbon dates, stratigraphic position and techno-typological features of lithic assemblage thi...
Article
Territory of Mongolia is situated in the center of Asia, a crossroad of the potential migration routes, that connect different Eurasian macroregions. Here an example of earliest appearance and longterm existence of small blade and microblade production has been found. Beyond that, the industries, that appeared within limited area of the Middle Sele...
Article
The authors present results of excavations of the Tolbor 21 and Tolbor 4 sites, situated in the Tolbor River valley, a tributary of the Selenga River, Northern Mongolia. In 2021, studies of the multilayered Tolbor-21 site that documents human habitation throughout the Upper Paleolithic were resumed. We focus on the stratigraphy, spatial distributio...
Article
Tsagaan Agui Cave, situated in Tsagaan Tsakhir limestone massif in the Gobi Altai Mountains of southern Mongolia, is the one of the rare stratified Holocene archaeological sites known in the Gobi Desert. During 1995-2000 excavation campaigns, cultural material spanning the late Bronze Age through the ethnographic present was recovered. In 2021, an...
Article
Middle and Upper Paleolithic human migrations and dispersals throughout Central Asia are usually associated with middle altitudes and mild steppe and forest-steppe environments with herds of large game mammals. However, since at least the Middle Paleolithic, human populations penetrated areas of Central Asia characterized by extreme arid climatic a...
Article
This article is intended to review the lithic assemblage from lowermost cultural level of the Shuidonggou 1 site (northern China). From the onset of investigation, this laminar assemblage was accepted as an example of intrusive event in the local cultural continuity. Technology and typology of the Shuidonggou 1 assemblage found its closest parallel...
Article
Levallois technology dispersal is associated with several events of human habitation of the Asian region. Emergence of the Levallois technology in China precedes or coincides in time with the penetration of Initial Upper Paleolithic laminar industries into this region. All known Paleolithic localities, the assemblages of which include the Levallois...
Article
Ostrich eggshell bead-making appears relatively early in regions inhabited by ostriches. This type of personal ornamentation emerged in Central Asia together with human populations associated with the laminar Initial Upper Paleolithic culture about 45,000 uncal BP or slightly earlier. Eggshell beads and pendants occur in Central Asia until the Midd...
Article
Full-text available
In Central and East Asia, the Upper Paleolithic dates as early as 45 ka cal BP, but until recently, there was little reliable information concerning human occupation during the following period, between 45 and 40 ka cal BP. Here we present results of the excavation of the site of Tolbor-21, in the Selenga drainage system, Northern Mongolia. We focu...
Article
E. P. Rybin, A. M. Khatsenovich The Mystery of Makarovo Stratum: the Earliest Upper Palaeolithic in Eurasia or a Cis-Baikalian Type of the Initial Upper Palaeolithic Technocomplex of MIS-3 Time? Palaeolithic of Cis-Baikal includes regional chronostratigraphic unit, called “Makarovo stratum”. It includes redeposited artifact assemblages with modifie...
Article
Archaeological sites with unclear conditions of sediment accumulation and stratigraphic disturbances are always complicated to research. Usually other sites in the region with better preservation of cultural layers helps to understand and divide them into cultural chronological stages. However lack of such sites results in the need to find other ap...
Article
Palaeolithic of Cis-Baikal includes regional chronostratigraphic unit, called "Makarovo stratum". It includes redeposited artifact assemblages with modified surface resulted from aeolian impact. It has been supposed earlier that paleogeographical conditions provoking aeolian corrasion of the artifact surfaces took place during the Murukta stadial (...
Article
Full-text available
The fossil record suggests that at least two major human dispersals occurred across the Eurasian steppe during the Late Pleistocene. Neanderthals and Modern Humans moved eastward into Central Asia, a region intermittently occupied by the enigmatic Denisovans. Genetic data indicates that the Denisovans interbred with Neanderthals near the Altai Moun...
Article
Full-text available
Well-stratified Middle Palaeolithic assemblages are extremely rare in Mongolia. Initially investigated between the 1960s and 1990s, three major Middle Palaeolithic sites in the Orkhon Valley of central Mongolia yielded a large quantity of data and generated many research questions that still await answers. Re-investigation of these sites has uncove...
Article
Recent investigations have highlighted an Asian variant of the so-called Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) broadly comparable in age and material culture to techno-complexes further to the west, but also showing distinct derived features. Here, we describe and provide corroborating evidence for another distinct technology employed in the Initial Uppe...
Article
Purpose. Recent investigations have highlighted an Asian variant of the so-called Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) broadly comparable in age and material culture to techno-complexes further to the west, but also showing distinct derived features. Several principal common technological features characterize the IUP in East Asia. The main targeted pro...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The problem of cultural and genetic relationships in the Upper Paleolithic of Trans-Baikal and Northern Mongolia is directly related to the stages of settlement of these territories. Critical review of the Siberian and Mongolian records revealed that the IkhTulberiin-Gol (Tolbor) Valley in Mongolia has a most densest concentration of stratified sit...
Article
Full-text available
The territories of modern Mongolia, China and Transbaikalia were inhabited by Struthio asiaticus (Asian ostrich) during the Pleistocene. That species had become extinct there by the Early – Middle Holocene boundary, but had shared its home range with early modern humans, which there is a limited evidence suggesting their active use of ostrich eggsh...
Article
Full-text available
Situated between the Altai Mountains and the Chinese Loess Plateau, the current territory of Mongolia played a pivotal role in Pleistocene human population dynamics in Northeast Asia with archaeological evidence suggesting the existence of cultural links with southern Siberia beginning in the Late Pleistocene. Here, we present preliminary results f...
Poster
Full-text available
Upper Paleolithic complexes of Northern Mongolia are chronologically determined, and represent the cultural sequence with changes, which could be stemmed from gradual evolution as well as migrations of population. The Late Upper Paleolithic was preceded by chronostratigraphic lacuna in 26 – 16 kya, when no one unequivocal evidence of human presence...
Article
Initial Upper Palaeolithic industries of South Siberia and Central Asia are dated to 35,000—50,000 14C years BP. They have been identified in Russian Altai, Eastern Kazakhstan, Transbaikalia, Mongolia, Dzungaria and Ordos in the north of China. This paper deals with the materials from Mountain Altai (Kara-Bom and Ust-Karakol 1), Eastern Kazakhstan...
Article
Initial Upper Palaeolithic industries of South Siberia and Central Asia are dated to 35,000-50,000 ¹⁴C years BP. They have been identified in Russian Altai, Eastern Kazakhstan, Transbaikalia, Mongolia, Dzungaria and Ordos in the north of China. This paper deals with the materials from Mountain Altai (Kara-Bom and Ust-Karakol 1), Eastern Kazakhstan...
Article
Tolbor-21 site is situated in the Northern Mongolia. The goal of excavation campaign 2016 was to research the western part of this occurrence. Five cultural horizons were uncovered in the excavation area 2: from the Final Upper Paleolithic to the Initial Upper Paleolithic. The last one was not identified here before. Combustion structures with clea...
Article
Full-text available
Basin of the Selenga River with tributaries was one of the most occupied region in the Paleolithic of Central Asia. The recent geochemical and petrographic research indicated that rock mass of high-quality cherts from Permian strata crosses the right tributaries of Selenga. More than 70 Paleolithic occurrences are known in the local valleys of the...
Article
Full-text available
In the Northern Hemisphere, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is recognized as a cold and dry period that marks the maximum southward extension of the Scandinavian Inlands in Europe. In Asia, the ice sheet did not expand from the Arctic into Siberia, yet the LGM had a significant impact at high latitudes and elevations, as well as in regions with a co...
Article
This paper is devoted to results of the excavation of multilayer Paleolithic site Tolbor-21 in Northern Mongolia. Site is located in the right tributary of Selenga River, in Ikh-Tulberiin-Gol River valley. Site was found at 2010 and tested by test, pits and test trench in 2011 and 2014. a result of exploring works the presence offour cultural horiz...
Article
According to a traditional point of view, the flake, blade and point are regarded as resulted blanks for the Levallois technology. However, there are no well-established criteria for determining Levallois blades in Siberia and the northern part of Central Asia. This category is likely to be a core trimming element in flake and point production or m...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous questions remain regarding the timing and the context of Upper Paleolithic emergence in Northeast Asia. Available data allow the recognition of a form of Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) documented in the Altai circa 45–40 ka 14C BP, and in the Cis- and Transbaikal around −37 ka 14C BP. In Northern Mongolia, a series of assemblages show int...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Numerous questions remain regarding the timing and the context of Upper Paleolithic emergence in Northeast Asia. Available data allow the recognition of a form of Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) (Brantingham et al, 2001) documented in the Altai circa 45-40 ka uncal BP (Goebel et al., 1993, Derevianko et al, 2000, Zwyns et al., 2012), in the Cis- an...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
The project proposed consist in the testing and excavation of newly discovered sites in Northern Mongolia that would provide the following: • An excavation with modern and high-resolution methods with a special emphasis on site formation processes • A larger sample of archeological material, necessary to illustrate the IUP assemblage variability in Mongolia and to support the comparison with the material from the Altai, the Cis-Baikal and the Trans-Baikal area. • A high-resolution chronological and environmental data set: it is currently lacking for these early assemblages. Improving the resolution of the regional chronocultural and environmental sequence would contribute to a better understanding of the impact of climatic change on the emergence, development and variability of IUP assemblages
Project
This project is aimed at reconstructing Late Pleistocene paleoenvironments, cultural sequences and human migration routes in Mongolia during the Middle Paleolithic. The first project goal is the re-dating of known localities by means of OSL and radiocarbon methods and reconnaissance for new sites in the Orkhon Valley and the Gobi Altai region.
Project
The session covers a broad range of topics among which: the dispersal of the genus Homo in Asia; the environmental impact on human settlement patterns; the cultural geography of Central Asia; time averaging issues in lithic assemblages; the evidence for horizontal and vertical cultural transmission in the archeological record; the impact of raw material economy on population dynamics; and the patterns of cultural evolution during the Pleistocene; paleoclimate reconstructions based on stratigraphic and isotopic data.