Ariel Fridman

Ariel Fridman
University of California, San Diego | UCSD · Rady School of Management

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8
Publications
2,085
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215
Citations

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
In the face of crises—wars, pandemics, and natural disasters—both increased selfishness and increased generosity may emerge. In this paper, we study the relationship between the presence of COVID-19 threat and generosity using a four-year longitudinal dataset (N = 696,942) capturing real donations made before and during the pandemic, as well as all...
Preprint
Full-text available
In the face of crises – wars, pandemics, and natural disasters – both increased selfishness and increased generosity may emerge. In this paper, we study the relationship between the presence of COVID-19 threat and generosity using a four-year longitudinal dataset (N = 696,942) capturing real donations made before and during the pandemic, as well as...
Preprint
Full-text available
Would you prefer to harm your own group or aid an opposing group? Across polarized issues (political party, abortion access, and gun control; N = 2,214), participants given this lose-lose choice prefer to harm their own side of a cause rather than aid the opposition. Our findings run counter to a harm-minimizing strategy as individuals generally be...
Article
Full-text available
How do attitudes toward vaccination change over the course of a public health crisis? We report results from a longitudinal survey of United States residents during six months (March 16 –August 16, 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic. Contrary to past research suggesting that the increased salience of a disease threat should improve attitudes toward vac...
Preprint
Full-text available
How do attitudes toward vaccination change over the course of a public health crisis? We report results from a longitudinal survey of United States residents during six months (March 16 – August 16, 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic. Contrary to past research suggesting that the increased salience of a disease threat should improve attitudes toward va...
Preprint
Full-text available
How do attitudes toward vaccination change over the course of a public health crisis? We report results from a longitudinal survey of United States residents during six months (March 16 – August 16, 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic. Contrary to past research suggesting that the increased salience of a disease threat should improve attitudes toward va...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
A longitudinal study of vaccine hesitancy during COVID-19