Ariel Alejandro Aptekmann

Ariel Alejandro Aptekmann
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey | Rutgers · Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

Doctor of Biological Chemistry
Postdoctoral Research Fellow

About

20
Publications
2,122
Reads
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176
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2013 - present
Universidad de Buenos Aires
Position
  • Ayudante 1º

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
The majority of microbial genomes have yet to be cultured, and most proteins identified in microbial genomes or environmental sequences cannot be functionally annotated. As a result, current computational approaches to describe microbial systems rely on incomplete reference databases that cannot adequately capture the functional diversity of the mi...
Article
Full-text available
Root Hairs (RHs) growth is influenced by endogenous and by external environmental signals that coordinately regulate its final cell size. We have recently determined that RH growth was unexpectedly boosted when Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings are cultivated at low temperatures. It was proposed that RH growth plasticity in response to low temperature...
Article
Full-text available
We study the limits imposed by transcription factor specificity on the maximum number of binding motifs that can coexist in a gene regulatory network, using the SwissRegulon Fantom5 collection of 684 human transcription factor binding sites as a model. We describe transcription factor specificity using regular expressions and find that most human t...
Article
Full-text available
Biological redox reactions drive planetary biogeochemical cycles. Using a novel, structure-guided sequence analysis of proteins, we explored the patterns of evolution of enzymes responsible for these reactions. Our analysis reveals that the folds that bind transition metal–containing ligands have similar structural geometry and amino acid sequences...
Article
Full-text available
Synonymous single nucleotide variants (sSNVs) are common in the human genome but are often overlooked. However, sSNVs can have significant biological impact and may lead to disease. Existing computational methods for evaluating the effect of sSNVs suffer from the lack of gold-standard training/evaluation data and exhibit over-reliance on sequence c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Metal-binding proteins have a central role in maintaining life processes. Nearly one-third of known protein structures contain metal ions that are used for a variety of needs, such as catalysis, DNA/RNA binding, protein structure stability, etc. Identifying metal-binding proteins is thus crucial for understanding the mechanisms of cellular activity...
Article
Full-text available
Background Aedes aegypti (L.) is an urban mosquito, vector of several arboviruses that cause severe diseases in hundreds of million people each year. The resistance to synthetic insecticides developed by Ae . aegypti populations worldwide has contributed to failures in vector control campaigns, increasing the impact of arbovirus diseases. In this c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Synonymous single nucleotide variants (sSNVs) are common in the human genome but are often overlooked. However, sSNVs can have significant biological impact and may lead to disease. Existing computational methods for evaluating the effect of sSNVs suffer from the lack of gold-standard training/evaluation data and exhibit over-reliance on sequence c...
Article
Full-text available
Linear motifs are short protein subsequences that mediate protein interactions. Hundreds of motif classes including thousands of motif instances are known. Our theory estimates how many motif classes remain undiscovered. As commonly done, we describe motif classes as regular expressions specifying motif length and the allowed amino acids at each mo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: We study the limits imposed by transcription factor specificity on the maximum size of a genetic regulatory network. Results: Most regular expressions for natural transcription factor binding site motifs are separated in sequence space by only one to three motif-discriminating positions. This mild specificity requirement puts the number...
Preprint
Full-text available
The majority of microbial genomes have yet to be cultured, and most proteins predicted from microbial genomes or sequenced from the environment cannot be functionally annotated. As a result, current computational approaches to describe microbial systems rely on incomplete reference databases that cannot adequately capture the full functional divers...
Article
The past two decades of analytical efforts have highlighted how much more remains to be learned about the human genome and, particularly, its complex involvement in promoting disease development and progression. While numerous computational tools exist for the assessment of the functional and pathogenic effects of genome variants, their precision i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Root hair cells are important sensors of soil conditions. Expanding several hundred times their original size, root hairs grow towards and absorb water-soluble nutrients. This rapid growth is oscillatory and is mediated by continuous remodelling of the cell wall. Root hair cell walls contain polysaccharides and hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins inc...
Article
Full-text available
The subtle mechanisms by which protein-DNA interactions remain functional across a wide range of temperatures are largely unknown. In this work, we manually curated available information relating fully sequenced archaeal genomes with organism growth temperatures. We built a motif that represents the core promoter of each species and calculated its...
Article
Full-text available
Root hair polar growth is endogenously controlled by auxin and sustained by oscillating levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These cells extend several hundred-fold their original size toward signals important for plant survival. Although their final cell size is of fundamental importance, the molecular mechanisms that control it remain largely...
Preprint
Full-text available
Root hair polar growth is endogenously controlled by auxin and sustained by oscillating levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These cells extend several hundred-fold their original size toward signals important for plant survival. Although their final cell size is of fundamental importance, the molecular mechanisms that control it remain largely...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
What are the determinants of protein-DNA evolution? Can we design new regulatory sites/networks? How do binding sites and recognizers compete ?
Project
root hairs and pollen tubes grow in a polar manner.