Ariana Sutton-Grier

Ariana Sutton-Grier
University of Maryland, College Park | UMD, UMCP, University of Maryland College Park · Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center

Ph.D.

About

82
Publications
41,944
Reads
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4,668
Citations
Citations since 2016
36 Research Items
4249 Citations
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Additional affiliations
July 2014 - present
University of Maryland, College Park
Position
  • Research Faculty
Description
  • I am now part of the NOAA and University of Maryland Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites doing research on the science of coastal resilience.

Publications

Publications (82)
Article
Full-text available
Much of the United States’ critical infrastructure is either aging or requires significant repair, leaving U.S. communities and the economy vulnerable. Outdated and dilapidated infrastructure places coastal communities, in particular, at risk from the increasingly frequent and intense coastal storm events and rising sea levels. Therefore, investmen...
Article
Full-text available
The IPCC 2013 Wetlands Supplement provided new guidance for countries on inclusion of wetlands in their National GHG Inventories. The United States has responded by including managed coastal wetlands for the first time in its 2017 GHG Inventory report along with an updated time series in the most recent 2018 submission and plans to update the time...
Article
Full-text available
In the United States, extensive investments have been made to restore the ecological function and services of coastal marine habitats. Despite a growing body of science supporting coastal restoration, few studies have addressed the suite of societally enabling conditions that helped facilitate successful restoration and recovery efforts that occurr...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal communities around the world are facing increased coastal flooding and shoreline erosion from factors such as sea-level rise and unsustainable development practices. Coastal engineers and managers often rely on gray infrastructure such as seawalls, levees and breakwaters, but are increasingly seeking to incorporate more sustainable natural...
Article
Infrastructure must become more resilient as the global climate changes and also more affordable in the economic and political context of a post-COVID world. We can solve this dual challenge and drive global infrastructure investment into a more sustainable direction by taking our cues from Nature.
Article
Coastal wetlands provide a series of ecosystem services, including flood risk reduction. However, the flood risk reduction from such a complex ecosystem is dependent on incoming extreme hurricane-driven hydrodynamic and wave conditions. This study develops a numerical modeling-based approach for investigating coastal wetlands exposure to storm surg...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past decade, coastal communities and ecosystems in the Northeast United States have begun to face acute and chronic impacts of climate change. Extreme events such as Superstorm Sandy caused stakeholders in this region to examine what information is needed to implement adaptation and mitigation plans to prepare for the next major storm. The...
Article
We elevate the undervalued role of wetland protective services for mitigating disastrous consequences of unprecedented weather-related events for human communities. Scientific evidence increasingly reveals that wetlands play critical hydrologic roles in landscapes, helping to mitigate flood, drought, and, in some cases, fire risks. However, wetland...
Article
Climate change is a pervasive and growing global threat to biodiversity and ecosystems. Here, we present the most up-to-date assessment of climate change impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems, and ecosystem services in the U.S. and implications for natural resource management. We draw from the 4th National Climate Assessment to summarize observed and...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal ecosystems are under pressure from a vast array of anthropogenic stressors, including development and climate change, resulting in significant habitat losses globally. Conservation policies are often implemented with the intent of reducing habitat loss. However, losses already incurred will require restoration if ecosystem functions and ser...
Article
Carbon offset credits, and associated projects, are acclaimed to address economic, environmental and social issues simultaneously. However, critics argue that carbon offset mechanisms are ill equipped to assist developing countries in achieving sustainable development. Social standards now exist to provide robust methods for assessing the social an...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Coasts chapter of the Third National Climate Assessment, published in 2014, focused on coastal lifelines at risk, economic disruption, uneven social vulnerability, and vulnerable ecosystems. This Coastal Effects chapter of the Fourth National Climate Assessment updates those themes, with a focus on integrating the socioeconomic and environmenta...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal wetlands store carbon dioxide (CO2) and emit CO2 and methane (CH4) making them an important part of greenhouse gas (GHG) inventorying. In the contiguous United States (CONUS), a coastal wetland inventory was recently calculated by combining maps of wetland type and change with soil, biomass, and CH4 flux data from a literature review. We as...
Article
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Limiting climate warming to <2°C requires increased mitigation efforts, including land stewardship, whose potential in the United States is poorly understood. We quantified the potential of natural climate solutions (NCS)—21 conservation, restoration, and improved land management interventions on natural and agricultural lands—to increase carbon st...
Article
Full-text available
Current and future climate-related coastal impacts such as catastrophic and repetitive flooding, hurricane intensity, and sea level rise necessitate a new approach to developing and managing coastal infrastructure. Traditional “hard” or “grey” engineering solutions are proving both expensive and inflexible in the face of a rapidly changing coastal...
Article
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The Second Warning to Humanity provides a clarion call for wetland researchers and practitioners given the loss and degradation of wetlands, the declining availability of fresh water, and the likely consequences of climate change. A coordinated response and approach to policies has the potential to prevent further degradation and support resilient...
Article
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There is substantial, growing literature that details positive human health effects, psychological and physiological, of exposure to “nature,” including “green” and “blue space,” with evidence suggesting that diversity of species or environments may have specific positive human health benefits. These health benefits are important ecosystem services...
Article
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Part 1 of this review synthesizes recent research on status and climate vulnerability of freshwater and saltwater wetlands, and their contribution to addressing climate change (carbon cycle, adaptation, resilience). Peatlands and vegetated coastal wetlands are among the most carbon rich sinks on the planet sequestering approximately as much carbon...
Article
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Since Hurricane Sandy, there has been heightened attention to increasing the resilience of coastal communities to extreme events, including storm protection provided by coastal ecosystems. Storm protection benefits (SPB) are the ability of ecosystems, including wetlands, reefs, and beaches/dunes, to attenuate waves and storm surge. SPB are a topic...
Article
Full-text available
Few conceptual frameworks attempt to connect disaster-associated environmental injuries to impacts on ecosystem services (the benefits humans derive from nature) and thence to both psychological and physiological human health effects. To our knowledge, this study is one of the first, if not the first, to develop a detailed conceptual model of how d...
Article
Coastal “blue carbon,” (carbon sequestered in salt marsh, mangroves, and seagrasses) is a newly recognized benefit. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with partners, has been exploring and developing new policy opportunities for coastal conservation using the climate benefits of these ecosystems. We detail NOAA's efforts (f...
Article
Full-text available
One of ecology's grand challenges is developing general rules to explain and predict highly complex systems. Understanding and predicting ecological processes from species' traits has been considered a 'Holy Grail' in ecology. Plant functional traits are increasingly being used to develop mechanistic models that can predict how ecological communiti...
Article
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Ecosystem services such as protection from storms and erosion, tourism benefits, and climate adaptation and mitigation have been increasingly recognized as important considerations for environmental policymaking. Recent research has shown that coastal ecosystems such as seagrasses, salt marshes, and mangroves provide climate mitigation services bec...
Article
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There is substantial evidence that natural infrastructure (i.e., healthy ecosystems) and combinations of natural and built infrastructure (“hybrid” approaches) enhance coastal resilience by providing important storm and coastal flooding protection, while also providing other benefits. There is growing interest in the U.S., as well as around the wor...
Article
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The concept of nature as capital is gaining visibility in policies and practices in both the public and private sectors. This change is due to an improved ability to assess and value ecosystem services, as well as to a growing recognition of the potential of an ecosystem services approach to make tradeoffs in decision making more transparent, infor...
Article
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We are at a key juncture in history where biodiversity loss is occurring daily and accelerating in the face of population growth, climate change, and rampant development. Simultaneously, we are just beginning to appreciate the wealth of human health benefits that stem from experiencing nature and biodiversity. Here we assessed the state of knowledg...
Article
There is a paucity of data in the published literature on the ecological and economic impacts of derelict fishing traps (DFTs) in coastal ecosystems. We synthesized results from seven NOAA-funded trap fisheries studies around the United States and determined that DFT-caused losses to habitat and harvestable annual catch are pervasive, persistent, a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods It is fairly well accepted that maintaining biodiversity is important for the production of ecosystem services. What is less clear is the relationship between biodiversity and direct measures of human health and well-being. This study addresses the question, “What do we know about relationships between biodiversity and...
Article
Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide many critical ecosystem services that support human health and well-being including providing food, storm protection, and carbon sequestration. Environmental stressors acting individually or concurrently and synergistically are reducing the ability of coastal ecosystems to provide key ecosystem services that may...
Article
Many agencies and organizations, including in the United States federal government, are expressing interest in the measurement and valuation of ecosystem services. Despite this interest, specific guidance on whether and how to incorporate ecosystem services into federal activities remains scarce. This analysis examines three regulations that are im...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: In this analysis we explored the potential for carbon sequestration and storage of ecosystems (herein “carbon services”) to be incorporated in the implementation of US federal policies. This effort stems from an interest at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in using “blue carbon” (the carbon services of...
Article
Coastal ecosystems such as mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrasses provide important ecosystem services, including nursery habitat for fish, shoreline protection, and the recently recognized service of carbon sequestration and storage. When these wetland ecosystems are degraded or destroyed, the carbon can be released to the atmosphere, where it ad...
Conference Paper
Many ecologists are understandably wary of environmental markets and “putting a price on nature.” But these markets can provide new conservation opportunities which are worth exploring. I will examine some of these opportunities in two case studies: 1) nutrient trading in the Chesapeake Bay, and 2) the inclusion of coastal habitats in global carbon...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Many agencies and organizations, including in the United States federal government, are expressing interest in the measurement and valuation of ecosystem services. Despite this interest, specific guidance on whether and how to incorporate ecosystem services into federal policies and activities remains scarce. In this a...
Article
Full-text available
The interaction of plant and microbial communities are known to influence the dynamics of methane emission in wetlands. Plant manipulations were conducted in an organic rich (JB-organic) and a mineral rich (JB-mineral) site in a tidal freshwater wetland to determine if plant removal impacted archaeal populations. In concert, a suite of process-base...
Article
For energetic reasons, iron reduction suppresses methanogenesis in tidal freshwater wetlands; however, when iron reduction is limited by iron oxide availability, methanogenesis dominates anaerobic carbon mineralization. Plants can mediate this microbial competition by releasing oxygen into the rhizosphere and supplying oxidized iron for iron reduce...
Article
Understanding the ecological processes that regulate the production and fate of methane (CH4) in wetland soils is essential for forecasting wetland CH4 emissions. Iron reduction is an important carbon mineralization pathway that is capable of suppressing CH4 production in freshwater wetlands, but our understanding of temperature regulation of iron...
Article
Background & aims Plants may have dissimilar effects on ecosystem processes because they possess different attributes. Given increasing biodiversity losses, it is important to understand which plant traits are key drivers of ecosystem functions. To address this question, we studied the response of two ecosystem functions that remove nitrogen (N) fr...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the economic impact of the expenditures from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) administered for coastal habitat restoration projects around the United States. Estimates of the total jobs created as well as the average number of jobs created p...
Article
1. Understanding patterns of trait variation across environmental variability is necessary for development of ecological predictions. The leaf economic spectrum (LES) has demonstrated global trade-offs in leaf traits, but it is unclear whether such patterns are robust in local communities exposed to varying environments. 2. We conducted separate gr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: This study examined the role of plant traits and environmental conditions on two nitrogen removing ecosystem functions, nitrogen uptake by plants and microbial denitrification. Main conclusion: We determined that both environmental conditions and plant traits influenced the ecosystem functions. We also determined that the...
Technical Report
The NOAA Research Council convened the Ecosystem Research Science Challenge Workshop (ERSCW) to further address two of NOAA’s science challenges that were identified in the 2010 NOAA “Workshop on Strengthening NOAA Science.” These were to: Assess and understand the roles of ecosystem processes and biodiversity in sustaining ecosystem services; and,...
Article
Anaerobic decomposition in wetland soils is carried out by several interacting microbial processes that influence carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions. To understand the role of wetlands in the global carbon cycle, it is critical to understand how differences in both electron donor (i.e., organic carbon) and terminal electron acceptor (TEA)...
Article
Critical Zone (CZ) research investigates the chemical, physical, and biological processes that modulate the Earth's surface. Here, we advance 12 hypotheses that must be tested to improve our understanding of the CZ: (1) Solar-to-chemical conversion of energy by plants regulates flows of carbon, water, and nutrients through plant-microbe soil networ...
Article
Full-text available
Global biodiversity loss has prompted research on the relationship between species diversity and ecosystem functioning. Few studies have examined how plant diversity impacts belowground processes; even fewer have examined how varying resource levels can influence the effect of plant diversity on microbial activity. In a field experiment in a restor...
Article
Ecosystem and biogeochemical responses to anthropogenic stressors are the result of complex interactions between plants and microbes. A mechanistic understanding of how plant traits influence microbial processes is needed in order to predict the ecosystem-level effects of natural or anthropogenic change. This is particularly true in wetland ecosyst...
Article
Full-text available
Background/Questions/Methods Species vary in the eco-physiological traits they possess which means species may differentially influence ecosystem functions such as microbial activity. In wetland ecosystems it is important to understand how different plant species influence microbial competition for resources because competition affects microbial re...
Data
Scatter plot of explanatory variables and mass-standardized DEA rates for each sample date. For every plot early May values are circles, mid-July values are triangles, and late August values are squares. A significant relationship is indicated by a * to the right of the regression line. Panels: A) Functional diversity, B) Total Inorganic N, C) Orga...
Data
Scatter plot of explanatory variables and DEA rates for each sample date. For every plot early May values are circles, mid-July values are triangles, and late August values are squares. A significant relationship is indicated by a * to the right of the regression line. Panels: A) Functional diversity, B) Total Inorganic N, C) MBC, D) Organic matter...
Data
The relationship between the CV of DEA rates and plant functional diversity. Scatter plot of the CV of DEA rates in early May, mid-July, and late August 2006 from each plot versus the FD value for that plot (n = 46, p = 0.28). Regression analyzed using a general linear model. Each point represents one plot. (0.03 MB TIF)
Data
DEA rates in early May, mid-July, and late August for monoculture plots. There was no significant species or date by species interaction among the monoculture plots, i.e. different species did not appear to promote different patterns in DEA over time. Monoculture plots' n for: Carex crinita, 2; Carex lurida, 1; Scirpus cyperinus, 2; Juncus effusus,...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Denitrification is an important ecosystem service that removes nitrogen (N) from N-polluted watersheds, buffering soil, stream, and river water quality from excess N by returning N to the atmosphere before it reaches lakes or oceans and leads to eutrophication. The denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) assay is widely used for measurin...
Article
An ongoing debate in ecology is the relationship between community or ecosystem structure and function. This relationship is particularly important in restored ecosystems because it is often assumed that restoring ecosystem structure will restore ecosystem functioning, but this assumption is frequently not tested. In this study, we used a novel app...
Article
Hydric soil development of riparian wetlands is primarily influenced by the hydrologic connection between the floodplains and the stream channel. Often, the goal of riparian restoration is to revitalize this connectivity through a restructuring of the stream channel and the floodplain; however, the effects of this restructuring on the physical and...