Argyris Papantonis

Argyris Papantonis
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen | GAUG · Institute of Pathology

PhD

About

40
Publications
11,214
Reads
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2,188
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
1426 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
Introduction
Argyris Papantonis is a Professor of Translational Epigenetics at the University Medical Center of the University of Göttingen. Argyris does research in Molecular & Cell Biology, and Genomics in an effort to understand the structure-to-function code of mammalian genomes. In the end, the rules that govern this relationship can help us predict how a cell will respond in conditions of homeostasis or disease.
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
University of Cologne
Position
  • Group Leader for Chromatin Systems Biology
November 2008 - July 2013
University of Oxford
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
The discovery that overexpressing one or a few critical transcription factors can switch cell state suggests that gene regulatory networks are relatively simple. In contrast, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) point to complex phenotypes being determined by hundreds of loci that rarely encode transcription factors and which individually have sm...
Article
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Human chromosomes are large spatially- and hierarchically-structured entities, the integrity of which needs to be preserved throughout the lifespan of the cell and in conjunction with cell cycle progression. Preservation of chromosomal structure is important for proper deployment of cell type-specific gene expression programs. Thus, aberrations in...
Article
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Cohesin is a ring-shaped multiprotein complex that is crucial for 3D genome organization and transcriptional regulation during differentiation and development. It also confers sister chromatid cohesion and facilitates DNA damage repair. Besides its core subunits SMC3, SMC1A and RAD21, cohesin in somatic cells contains one of two orthologous STAG su...
Article
The way that chromatin is organized in three-dimensional nuclear space is now acknowledged as a factor critical for the major cell processes, like transcription, replication and cell division. Researchers have been armed with new molecular and imaging technologies to study this structure-to-function link of genomes, spearheaded by the introduction...
Article
The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic is associated with microcephaly in newborns. Although the connection between ZIKV and neurodevelopmental defects is widely recognized, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that two recently isolated strains of ZIKV, an American strain from an infected fetal brain (FB-GWUH-2016) and a cl...
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have emerged as a powerful tool to uncover the genetic basis of human common diseases, which often show a complex, polygenic and multi-factorial etiology. These studies have revealed that 70-90% of all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with common complex diseases do not occur within genes (i.e...
Article
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Mammalian interphase chromosomes fold into a multitude of loops to fit the confines of cell nuclei, and looping is tightly linked to regulated function. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology has significantly advanced our understanding of this structure‐to‐function relationship. However, all 3C‐based methods rely on chemical cross‐linking...
Article
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Over time eukaryotic genomes have evolved to host genes carrying multiple exons separated by increasingly larger intronic, mostly non-protein-coding, sequences. Initially, little attention was paid to these intronic sequences, as they were considered not to contain regulatory information. However, advances in molecular biology, sequencing, and comp...
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Replicative senescence has a major impact on function and integrity of cell preparations. This process is reflected by continuous DNA methylation (DNAm) changes at specific CpG dinucleotides in the course of in vitro culture, and such modifications can be used to estimate the state of cellular senescence for quality control of cell preparations. St...
Article
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Mammalian cells have developed intricate mechanisms to interpret, integrate, and respond to extra-cellular stimuli. For example, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) rapidly activates proinflammatory genes, but our understanding of how this occurs against the ongoing transcriptional program of the cell is far from complete. We monitor the early phase of thi...
Article
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Mammalian cell nuclei contain three RNA polymerases (RNAP I, RNAP II and RNAP III), which transcribe different gene subsets, and whose active forms are contained in supramolecular complexes known as 'transcription factories.' These complexes are difficult to isolate because they are embedded in the 3D structure of the nucleus. Factories exchange co...
Article
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Maintenance of pluripotency, lineage commitment and differentiation of mammalian embryonic stem cells into all somatic cell types involves differential regulation of different subsets of genes, as does reprogramming of somatic cells back into a pluripotent state. It is now understood that the three-dimensional organization of the human genome asser...
Article
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While mapping total and poly-adenylated human transcriptomes has now become routine, characterizing nascent transcripts remains challenging, largely because nascent RNAs have such short half-lives. Here, we describe a simple, fast and cost-effective method to isolate RNA associated with transcription factories, the sites responsible for the majorit...
Article
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The conventional model for splicing involves excision of each intron in one piece; we demonstrate this inaccurately describes splicing in many human genes. First, after switching on transcription of SAMD4A, a gene with a 134 kb-long first intron, splicing joins the 3' end of exon 1 to successive points within intron 1 well before the acceptor site...
Article
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Background The rearrangement of nucleosomes along the DNA fiber profoundly affects gene expression, but little is known about how signalling reshapes the chromatin landscape, in three-dimensional space and over time, to allow establishment of new transcriptional programs. Results Using micrococcal nuclease treatment and high-throughput sequencing,...
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Differential regulation at the level of transcription provides a means for controlling gene expression in eukaryotes, especially during development. Insect model systems have been extensively used to decipher the molecular basis of such regulatory cascades, and one of the oldest such model systems is the regulation of chorion gene expression during...
Article
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Abstract Eukaryotic genomes - until recently dealt with as if they were a cohort of linear DNA molecules - are perplexed three-dimensional structures, the exact conformation of which profoundly affects genome function. Recent advances in molecular biology and DNA sequencing technologies have led to a new understanding of the folding of chromatin in...
Article
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Significance We use molecular dynamics to simulate reversible binding of proteins to DNA and uncover an unexpected force driving DNA compaction and protein aggregation. In the absence of any explicit interactions between proteins, or between templates, we find proteins aggregate spontaneously to locally organize the genome. The simulations reproduc...
Article
All eukaryotic cells contain four RNA polymerases originally defined by their sensitivity to different drugs. The traditional model for transcription sees the active form of the polymerase tracking along the DNA template as it makes its transcript. Factories can be localized in various ways; all have shortcomings. Arguably the best focus on activit...
Article
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Background It is widely accepted that chromatin 'responds' to physiological cues via protein:DNA interactions and nucleosome rearrangement [1,2], and that transcription plays a key role in its higher-order organization [3]. What remains elusive is how the nuclear landscape reshapes, in 3-D space and time, to facilitate such responses to unfold. Mat...
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Both the sequence of a promoter and the position of a gene in 3D nuclear space play critical roles in gene regulation, but few studies address their inter-relationship. Using human and viral promoters on minichromosomes and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to "high-precision" localization, we show that promoters binding the same trans...
Article
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An RNA polymerase has been thought to transcribe by seeking out a promoter, initiating and then tracking down the template. We add tumor necrosis factor α to primary human cells, switch on transcription of a 221-kb gene and monitor promoter position during the ensuing transcription cycle (using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to supe...
Article
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Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a potent cytokine that signals through nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) to activate a subset of human genes. It is usually assumed that this involves RNA polymerases transcribing responsive genes wherever they might be in the nucleus. Using primary human endothelial cells, variants of chromosome conformation capt...
Article
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We analyzed three human genes that were >200 kbp in length as they are switched on rapidly and synchronously by tumor necrosis factor alpha and obtained new insights into the transcription cycle that are difficult to obtain using continuously active, short, genes. First, a preexisting “whole-gene” loop in one gene disappears on stimulation; it is s...
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Regulatory DNA elements such as enhancers, silencers and insulators are embedded in metazoan genomes, and they control gene expression during development. Although they fulfil different roles, they share specific properties. Herein we discuss some examples and a parsimonious model for their function is proposed. All are transcription units that tet...
Article
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Human nuclei contain three RNA polymerases (I, II and III) that transcribe different groups of genes; the active forms of all three are difficult to isolate because they are bound to the substructure. Here we describe a purification approach for isolating active RNA polymerase complexes from mammalian cells. After isolation, we analyzed their prote...
Article
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The traditional model for transcription sees active polymerases tracking along their templates. An alternative (controversial) model has active enzymes immobilized in "factories." Recent evidence supports the idea that the DNA moves, not the polymerase, and points to alternative explanations of how regulatory motifs like enhancers and silencers wor...
Article
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Author Summary We were all taught that an RNA polymerase becomes active by diffusing to a promoter, initiating transcription, and then tracking like a locomotive down the DNA template. We test this using tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to switch on transcription of two human genes which lie far apart on the genetic map and then measure how clos...
Article
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During development or in response to environmental stimuli, eukaryotic genes change both their expression and position in 3D nuclear space. Then, is a gene transcribed because of its position, or is position determined by transcription? Are genes stochastically or deterministically engaged in transcription cycles? Recent results confirm that RNA po...
Article
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Bidirectional transcription is an interesting feature of eukaryotic genomes; yet not all aspects of its mechanism are understood. Silkmoth choriogenesis is a model system for studying transcriptional regulation at the initiation level. As chorion genes comprise a large group of divergently transcribed gene pairs, we are presented with the possibili...
Article
Regulation of silkmoth chorion genes has long been used as a model system for studying differential gene expression. The large numbers of genes, their overlapping expression patterns and the overall complexity of the system hinted towards an elaborate mechanism for transcriptional control. Recent studies, however, offer evidence of a molecular path...
Article
Full-text available
Genome-wide studies reveal that transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is dynamically regulated. To obtain a comprehensive view of a single transcription cycle, we switched on transcription of five long human genes (>100 kbp) with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and monitored (using microarrays, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization, a...
Article
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A protein displaying significant similarity to mammalian HMGA (high-mobility group A) proteins, but also bearing unique structural features, was isolated from silkmoth (Bombyx mori) follicular cells. This factor, named BmHMGA, exhibits specific binding preference for chorion gene promoter elements and induces DNA bending thereon. BmHMGA deploys tem...
Article
During Bombyx mori follicle development, fine-tuning of chorion gene expression is under the control of bidirectional promoters. In this work, we show that the silkmoth chromo-helicase/ATPase-DNA binding protein 1 (CHD1) ortholog is responsible for repositioning of nucleosomes on chorion promoters, where the factor binds specifically. Chorion genes...
Article
From the different cis-elements clustered on silkmoth chorion gene promoters, C/EBP binding sites predominate. Their sequence composition and dispersal vary amongst promoters of diverse developmental specificity. Occupancy of these sites by BmC/EBP was examined through Southwestern and ChIP assays modified to suit ovarian follicular cells. For the...
Article
Standard Chromatin immunoprecipitation protocols have been designed to suit studies performed on cell line cultures or yeast cells growing in liquid cultures. In these cases cross-linking/fixation takes place directly in the growing medium of the cells by the addition of a general fixation reagent. When applied on whole isolated silkmoth follicles,...
Article
A novel factor featuring a composite AT hook/basic region-leucine zipper DNA-binding domain was isolated from Bombyx mori follicular cells. Screening of EST databases derived from a variety of metazoans revealed the exclusive presence of BmCbZ homologues in insect species. BmCbZ characteristic features and gene organization are discussed, in compar...
Article
One previously unidentified cDNA clone coding for a C/EBP factor, BmC/EBP, was isolated from Bombyx mori follicular cells. This is the first time that a C/EBP factor has been isolated and characterized in Lepidoptera. We provide information concerning structural features and developmental specificity, as well as in vitro interaction properties with...

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