Arash Mahnan

Arash Mahnan
University of Minnesota Twin Cities | UMN · Department of Kinesiology

PhD Candidate in Biomechanics and Neuromotor Control

About

14
Publications
3,979
Reads
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68
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
68 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230510152025
Introduction
Arash Mahnan currently works at the Human Sensorimotor Control lab at the University of Minnesota. Arash does research in neuromotor control, human movement neuroscience, and biomechanics.
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
January 2016 - December 2020
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Field of study
  • Biomechanics and neuromotor control
September 2012 - November 2014
Amirkabir University of Technology
Field of study
  • Biomedical engineering

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Finger position sense is a proprioceptive modality highly important for fine motor control. Its developmental time course is largely unknown. This cross-sectional study examined its typical development in 138 children (8–17 years) and a group of 14 healthy young adults using a fast and novel psychophysical test that yielded objective measures of po...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Cervical dystonia (CD) is a type of focal dystonia that is characterized by involuntary neck postures. The underlying neurophysiology mechanism of CD is unknown, but there is increasing empirical evidence that motor deficits of CD are associated with somatosensory and proprioceptive deficits in the upper limb area. Vibro-tactile stim...
Conference Paper
With a growing interest in real-time control of prostheses and wearable rehabilitation devices to treat motor dysfunction, there is a need to classify normal and abnormal body movement using kinematic and electrophysiological data. This paper presents a novel linear algorithm that can classify 10 distinct neck movements based on signals of only fou...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that individuals behave differently in certain virtual reality tasks. The effect of VR on human posture and stability is an important factor that can influence the future applications of VR devices. This current study seeks to investigate how a person’s postural stability differs between VR and normal environment while a...
Article
Full-text available
Background and purpose: Complementary therapies, such as yoga, have been proposed to address gait and balance problems in Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the effects of yoga on gait and static balance have not been studied systematically in people with PD (PWP). Here we evaluated the effects of a 12-week long Hatha yoga intervention on biomechan...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Proprioceptive signals from mechanoreceptors embedded in ligaments, tendons, and muscles are essential for the control of muscle tone and voluntary movement. Numerous neurological and orthopedic disorders are associated with proprioceptive dysfunction that impairs the control of balance and/or fine motor function. However, obtaining objective measu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Speech analysis using microphones can be problematic for Voice Activity Detection (VAD) in the presence of background noise. This study explored the use of wearable accelerometers instead of microphones. We assessed if accelerometers placed on the neck can be part of a VAD system embedded in a wearable collar-like device that delivers vibro-tactile...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Proprioceptive afferents from the ankle joint are essential feedback for maintaining balance. However, there is no widely accepted test or measurement system available for determining the proprioceptive accuracy of the human ankle joint. Here, we present a system with a novel hardware design that applies an established psychometric testing protocol...
Article
Full-text available
Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is an incurable focal dystonia of the larynx that impairs speech and communication. Vibro-tactile stimulation (VTS) alters afferent proprioceptive input to sensorimotor cortex that controls speech. This proof-of-concept study examined the effect of laryngeal VTS on speech quality and cortical activity in 13 SD participants...
Article
Full-text available
High vibration transfer from a tennis racquet to the player may cause discomfort, and is hypothesized to influence performance and the onset of muscle fatigue. This study examined a racquet with a novel vibration damping technology (VDT) designed to mitigate frame vibration. Racquet vibration, post-impact vibration transfer to the player, arm elect...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a voice disorder that leads to strained or choked speech. SD is unresponsive to speech therapy. There is no cure for SD. Preliminary work from our group showed that voice quality in SD improves when vibro-tactile stimulation (VTS) is applied over the larynx as a non-invasive form of neuromodulation. The goal of this pape...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a debilitating voice/speech disorder without an effective cure. To obtain a better understanding of the underlying cortical neural mechanism of the disease we analyzed electroencephalographic (EEG) signals of people with SD during voice production. Method: Ten SD individuals and 10 healthy volunteers produced...
Article
Full-text available
This review addresses the role of exercise as an intervention for treating neurological disease. It focuses on three major neurological diseases that either present in acute or neurodegenerative forms—Parkinson’s disease, cerebellar ataxia, and cortical stroke. Each of the diseases affects primarily different brain structures, namely the basal gang...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Vibro-tactile stimulation (VTS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique that our laboratory developed for people with SD. In a preliminary research, our team documented that a one-time 30-minute application of VTS can result in measurable improvements in the voice quality of people with SD. In a new research study funded by the National Institutes of Health, we now investigate systematically the possible longer-term benefits of this approach for improving the voice symptoms of people with SD. Study participants will administer VTS at home by themselves for up to 8 weeks. Researchers will assess their voice quality and monitor the corresponding neurophysiological changes in the brain using electroencephalography in the laboratory at the beginning, in the middle and at the end of the VTS in-home training. The findings of the study will inform patients and clinicians on the possible impact of this therapeutic approach. It could promote the development of wearable VTS devices that would enlarge the available therapeutic arsenal for treating voice symptoms in SD.
Project
develop assessment and training protocols for neurorehabilitation.