Anumeha Shukla

Anumeha Shukla
Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany · Cenozoic Palaeobotany

PhD

About

40
Publications
23,418
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April 2007 - present
Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
A permineralized wood from the Deccan Intertrappean beds of central India is identified as a member of the family Lythraceae. The fossil wood found is similar to the modern genus Lagerstroemia and is characterized by diffuse porous to semi-ring porous wood, growth rings marked by marginal parenchyma, simple perforations, scanty paratracheal axial p...
Article
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This study reports the oldest fossil record of the genus Adina, A. vastanenesis n. sp., from the early Eocene of Vastan lignite mine (Cambay Shale Formation), Surat district, Gujarat. This fossil wood is characterized by diffuse porous wood, predominantly solitary tylosed vessels, simple perforations, scanty paratracheal to diffuse to sometimes dif...
Article
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A fossil of a mayfly nymph that shows similarities with the modern genus Teloganella Ulmer, 1939 of the family Teloganellidae is recorded for the first time from the Indian subcontinent. It is systematically described from the Gurha lignite mine of Bikaner, Rajasthan which belongs to the Palana Formation (late Paleocene-early Eocene). As assignment...
Article
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A new fossil wood of Hopeoxylon i.e. H. umarsarensis sp. nov. showing close resemblance with the modern wood of Sindora/Copaifera of the subfamily Detarioideae (family Fabaceae) is described from the Umarsar lignite mine of Kutch basin, Gujarat that belongs to the Naredi Formation of the early Eocene age. Detarioideae is one of the reinstated subfa...
Article
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The present study deals with the reporting and description of the first fossil record of Mallotus Lour. fruit from all over the world. The edible parts of plants are too soft to be preserved and therefore, are rare in fossil records. Fossil fruit of Mallotus mollissimus (Geiseler) Airy Shaw (Euphorbiaceae), a rainforest tree, is described from the...
Article
The Dioscoreaceae is a monocotyledonous family belonging to the order Dioscoreales. It includes two other families, the Burmanniaceae and the Nartheciaceae. Dioscoreaceae is the largest family of this order comprising 650–700 extant species included in four genera, which are widely distributed throughout warm temperate, subtropical and tropical reg...
Article
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During the early Eocene ( 55-52. Ma), when the Indian subcontinent relished equatorial climatic conditions, lignite was deposited along its north western margin. Lignite mines of northwestern India have proved to be an outstanding resource for palaeoenvironmental information. The Vastan lignite mine of the early Eocene age situated near Surat distr...
Article
Today the existence of tropical rainforests in the Indian subcontinent is restricted to the fringes of the Western Ghats, greater Assam region and some small places in Odisha. However, the palaeovegetation reconstruction in this study illustrates the existence of equatorial tropical forest in northwestern India (Bikaner, Rajasthan) during the early...
Article
The early Eocene is characterized by a warmer phase, even at high latitudes. The CO2 level ranged from 1000 to 2000 ppm due to the increase in volcanic activity. The climate dynamics of the Indian subcontinent and biotic exchange between the neighboring continents can be traced by studying the Eocene fossil assemblages which are nicely preserved in...
Article
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Five petrified woods showing affinities with Hopea of the family Dipterocarpaceae, Berrya of Malvaceae, Eucalyptus of Myrtaceae and Diospyros of Ebenaceae are systematically described from the Cuddalore Sandstone Formation exposed near Puducherry, Tamil Nadu. Among them, four are new species, namely Hopenium tertiarum sp. nov., Berryoxylon cuddalor...
Article
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The systematics of a fossil wood assigned to Duabangoxylon (family Lythraceae) is described from the Deccan Intertrappean beds of Kutch, Gujarat, western India considered to be late Maastrichtian to early Danian in age. This fossil is the oldest record of Duabanga as its previous records are not older than Eocene. As the intertrappean flora of Kutc...
Article
Monsoonal climates at low latitudes (< 32°N) are an inevitable consequence of seasonal migrations of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), but the character of these monsoons depends on continental configuration, orographic expression and the strength of Hadley circulation. To explore the evolution of monsoon systems across southern Asia we c...
Article
We reconstruct the rise of a segment of the southern flank of the Himalaya-Tibet orogen, to the south of the Lhasa terrane, using a paleoaltimeter based on paleoenthalpy encoded in fossil leaves from two new assemblages in southern Tibet (Liuqu and Qiabulin) and four previously known floras from the Himalaya foreland basin. U-Pb dating of zircons c...
Article
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Botryococcus, an important member of the planktonic algae, occurs in fresh water pools, lakes and occasionally in brackish water lagoons with wide distribution in tropical and temperate climate zones throughout the world. It is recognized as an oil producing alga that is found in rock records from the Precambrian onwards. Here, this alga was retrie...
Preprint
Full-text available
Botryococcus, an important member of the planktonic algae, occurs in freshwater pools, lakes and occasionally in brackish-water lagoons, with wide distribution in tropical and temperate climate zones throughout the world. It is recognised as an oil-producing alga that is found in rock records from the Precambrian onwards. Here, this alga was retrie...
Article
A 105 m early Eocene section exposed in the Gurha mine in the Nagaur-Ganganagar Basin, Rajasthan, India, ar-chiving remains of equatorial vegetation at a time of extreme global warmth and close to the onset of the India-Eurasia collision, is investigated using palynostratigraphic and palynofacies analyses. Four palynozones e.g., Palmidites plicatus...
Article
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Thick lignite deposits on the western margin of India were preserved on account of thick vegetation which got buried underneath due to tectonic activities that occurred in northwestern part of India during the early Palaeogene. Study of the fossil flora preserved in these beds is important to deduce the palaeoclimate of the region. Therefore, a fie...
Article
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A fossil fruit resembling extant Cocos nucifera of the family Arecaceae is reported for the first time from the early Eocene sediments of Gujarat. The fossil was collected from the Tarkeshwar lignite mine of the Surat District which belongs to the Cambay Shale Formation. Its occurrence indicates coastal conditions in the region during the depositio...
Article
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The Kutch region of western India (Gujarat State) is today arid to semiarid and characterised by mostly ephemeral streams which carry water during the monsoon. The uneven distribution of rainfall and disturbed topography are the result of climate change during the Cenozoic period. Two fossil woods, namely Bauhinium palaeomalabaricum Prakash and Pra...
Article
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Two new fossil woods resembling Eucalyptus L' H'erit of the family Myrtaceae are described from the Palaeocene and Eocene successions of Gujarat and Rajasthan, respectively. They are characterized by diffuse-porous wood, heavily tylosed vessels arranged in echelon, vasicentic tracheids, simple perforations, thin rays and non septate fibres with bor...
Article
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During the early Eocene, Rajasthan was positioned near the equator and had a warm and humid tropical climate dominated by tropical rainforests like the present-day equatorial forests of South India. Many of the plants retrieved as fossils from Rajasthan are growing there as refugee. This study further strengthens this view as it reports a new speci...
Article
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This study reports a new fossil leaf of Kleinhovia L., Kleinhovia bikanerensis sp. nov., from the Eocene clay mine of the Marh Formation of Bikaner, Rajasthan. The leaf resembling Kleinhovia hospita L. of the family Malvaceae is described for the first time from India. The leaf is characterized by very wide ovate shape, basal actinodromous venation...
Article
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The high rainfall and low sea level during Early Holocene had a significant impact on the development and sustenance of dense forest and swamp-marsh cover along the southwest coast of India. This heavy rainfall flooded the coastal plains, forest flourishing in the abandoned river channels and other low-lying areas in midland.The coastline and other...
Article
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The Miocene flora of peninsular India is of special interest because during this epoch large scale migration of taxa took place from Southeast Asia as a result of the establishment of land connections caused by the suturing of the Indian and Eurasian plates. In order to understand this change in the flora, the study of the Miocene flora of peninsul...
Chapter
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The study of the Miocene flora of extra peninsula India is important in order to understand the change in the flora as a result of the upheaval of Himalaya. The Miocene megafossil vegetation of the region is predominantly found in the form of leaf impressions/ compressions, though flowers, fruits and woods are also known. It is known mainly from Ja...
Article
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Mizoram, a state situated in the northeast corner of India, is very rich in fossil woods belonging to the Tipam Group (Late Miocene-Early Pliocene in age). Four new fossil woods, namely Swintonioxylon hailakandiense Prakash & Tripathi, Bombacacioxylon tertiarum Mehrotra et al., gen. et sp. nov., Dipterocarpoxylon jammuense Guleria et al. and Bischo...
Article
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Climate has played a crucial role in assigning a different kind of topography to Rajasthan and Gujarat since the Cenozoic time. Evidently, three genera, namely, Dipterocarpus Gaert. f., Hopea Roxb. and Shorea Roxb. of the Dipterocarpaceae are described from the Neogene sediments of western India (Rajasthan and Gujarat). These taxa are marked by the...
Article
Eleven fossil woods belonging to seven families are described from a petrified wood forest of Mizoram. This fossil assemblage is derived from sediments belonging to the Tipam Group considered to be Late Miocene–Early Pliocene in age. The modern counterparts of the identified taxa are: Gluta L., Mangifera L. (Anacardiaceae), Bursera Jacq. ex L. (Bur...
Article
Full-text available
Cocos sahnii Kaul, a fossil palm fruit, is validated and described from the Fuller's earth deposits of Kapurdi village of Rajasthan considered as Early Eocene in age. The fossil best resembles the genus Cocos, particularly Cocos nucifera L., which is now a common coastal element thriving in highly moist conditions. The recovery of this coconut-like...
Article
Full-text available
A fossil wood belonging to Eucalyptus L'Hérit of the Myrtaceae is described from the Deccan Intertrappean beds of central India, considered as Late Maastrichtian- Danian in age. Phylogenetic analysis based on the morphological data of 16 extant eucalypts and the present fossil indicates that the fossil wood belongs to the eucalypt group, closest to...
Article
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A new fossil fruit wing of Shorea Roxb. belonging to the family Dipterocarpaceae is described from the Early Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat. It resembles best the extant species Shorea macroptera Dyer, which is a prominent member of the tropical evergreen forests of the Malayan Peninsula. The present finding, along with the other megafossil...
Article
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Shukla, A., Mehrotra, R.C. & Guleria, J.S. iFirst article. African elements (fossil woods) from the upper Cenozoic sediments of western India and their palaeoecological and phytogeographical significance. Alcheringa, 1–20. ISSN 0311-5518.Fossil woods resembling tropical African taxa are described from late Neogene–Pleistocene sediments of western I...
Article
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The present communication forms the first report of occurrence of a palm wood in the Miocene sediments of Kargil Formation near Kargil at an altitude of 4500 m. The wood exhibits palm-like anatomical structures and accordingly assigned to the genus Palmoxylon Schenk. Since it differs from the known species, a new name Palmoxylon kargilensis sp. nov...
Article
Full-text available
The paper describes two gymnospermous woods, namely Araucarioxylon Kraus, 1870 and Podocarpoxylon Gothän, 1905 from the Late Cenozoic sediments (Shumar Formation) of district Jaisalmer, Rajasthan, western India. The woods indicate favourable climatic conditions for the growth of mesic vegetation in Rajasthan till Plio-Pleistocene time compared to t...

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Project
NECLIME is an open international network of scientists working on Cenozoic climate evolution and related changes of continental ecosystems. During the past 65 million years of Earth history, globally warmer-then-present conditions prevailed in a world with almost modern paleogeography. These timespans represent promising case studies for anticipated future scenarios. Within the NECLIME network, we aim to combine data on past climate change and its environmental impact for large-scale reconstructions. NECLIME research activities comprise paleoclimate reconstructions, including atmospheric CO₂ and ecosystem analysis using multiple quantitative methods on various primarily continental proxies (plants; vertebrates; invertebrates; geochemistry and geological proxies). Complementing model studies are employed to assess connections and processes driving ocean, atmosphere and biosphere at global and regional scales. NECLIME was established in 1999 with the aim to understand Neogene trends across Eurasia. This basic idea quickly and constantly expanded to a global interest and a wider stratigaphical frame. The steadily growing NECLIME network with currently around 140 members in 34 countries is coordinated by a team of researchers and an advisory board. NECLIME holds annual conferences and workshops and administers working groups bringing forward scientific exchange, joint projects, and the integration of research data. For more information go to www.neclime.de