Antony M. Knights

Antony M. Knights
University of Plymouth | UoP · Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre

PhD Marine Ecology

About

73
Publications
23,540
Reads
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2,020
Citations
Citations since 2017
43 Research Items
1578 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
Introduction
Antony M. Knights currently works at the Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre, University of Plymouth. Antony does research in marine ecology, focusing on climate change impacts on species performance, early life histories and their dispersal and ecological risk assessment.
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - present
Plymouth University
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2013 - present
University of Galway
Position
  • Research Associate
June 2010 - December 2012
University of Liverpool
Position
  • PDRA

Publications

Publications (73)
Article
Continued anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are acidifying our oceans, and hydrogen ion concentrations in surface oceans are predicted to increase 150% by 2100. Ocean acidification (OA) is changing ocean carbonate chemistry, including causing rapid reductions in calcium carbonate availability with implications for many marine organisms, includ...
Article
Full-text available
In coastal habitats artificial structures typically support lower biodiversity and can support greater numbers of non-native and opportunistic species than natural rocky reefs. Eco-engineering experiments are typically trialed to succeed; but arguably as much is learnt from failure than from success. Our goal was to trial a generic, cost effective,...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem-based management (EBM) is promoted as the solution for sustainable use. An ecosystem-wide assessment methodology is therefore required. In this paper, we present an approach to assess the risk to ecosystem components from human activities common to marine and coastal ecosystems. We build on: (i) a linkage framework that describes how huma...
Article
Full-text available
The marine environment is heavily exploited, but unintentional consequences cause wide-ranging negative effects to its characteristics. Linkage frameworks (e.g., DPSIR [driver-pressure-state-impact-response]) are commonly used to describe an interaction between human activities and ecological characteristics of the ecosystem, but as each linkage is...
Article
Predicting dispersal and quantifying ecological connectivity are increasingly referenced as fundamental to understanding how biodiversity is structured across space and time. Dispersal models can provide insight, but their predictions are influenced by our capacity to simulate the biology and physics known to influence dispersal. In a marine contex...
Article
Full-text available
Background Many marine man-made structures (MMS), such as oil and gas platforms or offshore wind turbines, are nearing their ‘end-of-life’ and require decommissioning. Limited understanding of MMS decommissioning effects currently restricts the consideration of alternative management possibilities, often leaving complete removal as the only option...
Article
Full-text available
Aim In coastal marine systems, biogenic reef‐building species have great importance for conservation as they provide habitat for a wide range of species, promoting biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and services. Biogenic reef persistence and recovery from perturbations depend on recolonization by new recruits. Characterizing larval dispersal amon...
Article
Urbanisation of coastal areas and growth in the blue economy drive the proliferation of artificial structures in marine environments. These structures support distinct ecological communities compared to natural hard substrates, potentially reflecting differences in the materials from which they are constructed. We undertook a meta-analysis of 46 st...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem-based management requires a sound integration of how species populations influence ecosystem functioning across heterogeneous spatial and temporal scales. Here, we combined an empirically-derived metabolic model for the effect of the common ragworm Hediste diversicolor on sediment biogeochemistry (measured as sediment oxygen uptake) with...
Poster
Full-text available
Numerous marine man-made structures (MMS) are now at, or nearing, the end of their intended life but we only have a limited understanding of decommissioning and its effect on ecosystems. In the North Sea, regulations restrict decommissioning options mostly to complete removal, with little consideration of alternative management options and the envi...
Article
Data that can be used to monitor biodiversity through time are essential for conservation and management. The reef-forming worm, Sabellaria alveolata (L. 1767) is currently classed as ‘Data deficient’ due to an imbalance in the spread of data on its distribution. Little is known about the distribution of this species around Ireland. Using data arch...
Article
Ocean acidification and warming (OAW) pose a threat to marine organisms, with particular negative effects on molluscs, and can jeopardize the provision of associated ecosystem services. As predation is an important factor shaping populations in the marine environment, the ability of organisms to retain traits valuable in predation resistance under...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: To investigate some of the environmental variables underpinning the past and present distribution of an ecosystem engineer near its poleward range edge. Location: >500 locations spanning >7,400 km around Ireland. Results: Through plotting 981 records of presence and absence, we revealed a discontinuous distribution with discretely bounded sub...
Article
Soft-sediment biogeochemistry is influenced by the bioturbation activity of benthic invertebrates. We investigated whether the effect of two macrobenthos bioturbators, Limecola balthica and Hediste diversicolor, on sediment oxygen uptake can be described by allometric principles of metabolic activity scaling with animal body size and population bio...
Article
Full-text available
Background Numerous man-made structures (MMS) have been installed in various parts of the ocean (e.g. oil and gas structures, offshore wind installations). Many are now at, or nearing, the end of their intended life. Currently, we only have a limited understanding of decommissioning effects. In many locations, such as the North Sea, regulations res...
Article
Positive species interactions such as facilitation are important for enabling species to persist, especially in stressful conditions, and the nature and strength of facilitation varies along physical and biological gradients. Expansion of coastal infrastructure is creating hotspots of invasive species which can spillover into natural habitats, but...
Article
Full-text available
Negative impacts of global climate change are predicted for a range of taxa. Projections predict marked increases in sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification (OA), arguably placing calcifying organisms at most risk. While detrimental impacts of environmental change on the growth and ultrastructure of bivalve mollusk shells have been shown,...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Under the threat of climate change populations can disperse, acclimatise or evolve in order to avoid fitness loss. In light of this, it is important to understand neutral gene flow patterns as a measure of dispersal potential, but also adaptive genetic variation as a measure of evolutionary potential. In order to assess genetic variati...
Article
The goal of this paper is to propose a screening method for assessing the environmental risk to aquatic systems in harbours worldwide. A semi-quantitative method is based on environmental pressures, environmental conditions and societal response. The method is flexible enough to be applied to 15 harbours globally distributed through a multinational...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastics are now synonymous with human impacts on the environment and as a threat to marine organisms. Numerous taxa are at risk from microplastics including commercially valuable bivalves as seafood, which are also disproportionately important as biogenic reef-forming species that enhance biodiversity such that they are commonly protected und...
Article
Full-text available
1. Climate change and coastal urbanisation are driving the replacement of natural habitats with artificial structures and reclaimed land globally. These novel habitats are often poor surrogates for natural habitats. 2. The application of integrated greening of grey infrastructure (IGGI) to artificial shorelines demonstrates how multifunctional str...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Under the threat of climate change populations can disperse, acclimatise or evolve in order to avoid fitness loss. In light of this, it is important to understand neutral gene flow patterns as a measure of dispersal potential, but also adaptive genetic variation as a measure of evolutionary potential. In order to assess genetic variatio...
Article
Future climate change is leading to the redistribution of life on Earth as species struggle to cope with rising temperatures. Local adaptation allows species to become locally optimised and persist despite environmental selection, but the extent to which this occurs in nature may be limited by dispersal and gene flow. Congeneric marine gastropod sp...
Article
Estimating the potential environmental risks of worldwide coastal recreational navigation on water quality is an important step towards designing a sustainable global market. This study proposes the creation of a global atlas of the environmental risk of marinas on water quality by applying the Marina Environmental Risk Assessment (MERA) procedure....
Article
Estimating the potential environmental risks of worldwide coastal recreational navigation on water quality is an important step towards designing a sustainable global market. This study proposes the creation of a global atlas of the environmental risk of marinas on water quality by applying the Marina Environmental Risk Assessment (MERA) procedure....
Preprint
Background Under the threat of climate change populations can disperse, acclimatise or evolve in order to avoid fitness loss. In light of this, it is important to understand neutral gene flow patterns as a measure of dispersal potential, but also adaptive genetic variation as a measure of evolutionary potential. In order to assess genetic variation...
Article
Significance Estimating the dispersal of propagules in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems has been of primary research interest for many years, yet efforts to accurately predict dispersal, especially in marine ecosystems, have remained a significant and unresolved challenge. A common approach is to use a biophysical model, but field stu...
Article
Parasites are important structural components of marine communities that can affect organism fitness and ecological interactions, and the provision of ecosystem services. Here, we investigate the host association of Polydora ciliata with two ecologically and economically important oyster species (Ostrea edulis, Magallana gigas) and examine its impa...
Article
Extreme fluctuations in abiotic conditions can induce a biological stress response (e.g. bleaching) detrimental to an organism's health. In some instances, organisms can recover if conditions are alleviated, such as through co-occurrence with other species that confer protection. Biodiverse, multitrophic communities are increasingly recognised as i...
Article
Marine harbours are the focus of a diverse range of activities and subject to multiple anthropogenically induced pressures. Support for environmental management options aimed at improving degraded harbours depends on understanding the factors which influence people's perceptions of harbour environments. We used an online survey, across 12 harbours,...
Article
Ocean acidification and warming may threaten future seafood production, safety and quality by negatively impacting the fitness of marine species. Identifying changes in nutritional quality, as well as species most at risk, is crucial if societies are to secure food production. Here, changes in the biochemical composition and nutritional properties...
Article
Worldwide, coastlines are becoming increasingly hardened by infrastructure in response to population growth, need for space, and coastal protection. Coastal and marine infrastructure (CMI) supports fewer species and lower abundance and diversity than analogous natural rocky habitats, which can alter community composition and ecosystem functioning....
Article
Fishing has long been considered the most impactful human activity on the marine ecosystem. To adopt ecosystem based fisheries management (EBFM) requires consideration of all human impacts, not just those of fishing. The ODEMM (Options for Delivering Ecosystem-based Marine Management) approach provides an integrated ecosystem assessment that is a f...
Article
Globally, non-native species (NNS) have been introduced and now often entirely replace native species in captive aquaculture; in part, a result of a perceived greater resilience of NSS to climate change and disease. Here, the effects of ocean acidification and warming on metabolic rate, feeding rate, and somatic growth was assessed using two co-occ...
Article
Full-text available
Inter-individual variation in behavioural traits has important implications for evolutionary and ecological processes. Site fidelity, where individuals consistently use the same foraging site, is common among marine predators. Sex differences in foraging are also well studied in marine vertebrates, but the extent to which consistent inter-individua...
Article
For many species, ocean acidification (OA) is having negative physiological consequences on their fitness and resilience to environmental change, but less is known about the ecosystem effects of these changes. Here, we assess how OA conditions predicted for 2100 affects the biological functioning of an important habitat-forming species Mytilus edul...
Article
Full-text available
Reliance on the marine environment for the provision of food is ever-increasing, but future climate change threatens production. Despite this concern, the impact on seafood quality and success of the seafood industry is unknown. Using a short-term study, we test these concerns using a major aquaculture species—Crassostrea gigas—exposing them to thr...
Article
Taxonomic information provides a crucial understanding of the most basic component of biodiversity – which organisms are present in a region or ecosystem. Taxonomy, however, is a discipline in decline, at times perceived as ‘obsolete’ due to technical advances in science, and with fewer trained taxonomists and analysts emerging each year to replace...
Article
The effects of climate change and an expanding human population are driving the need for the expansion of coastal and marine infrastructure (CMI), the development of which is introducing hard substrate into the marine environment on a previously unseen scale. Whilst the majority of previous research has focussed on how physical features affect inte...
Article
Space is one of the primary limiting resources for organisms on the intertidal rocky shore. This paper examined the effect of reduced density on key traits (mortality and growth) on the intertidal barnacles, Chthamalus montagui and Semibalanus balanoides , on the mid-shore in Plymouth, UK. Intra- and interspecific treatments comprising of C. montag...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Coastal defence structures are proliferating as a result of rising sea levels and stormier seas. With the realisation that most coastal infrastructure cannot be lost or removed, research is required into ways that coastal defence structures can be built to meet engineering requirements, whilst also providing relevant ecosystem services-ecological e...
Article
Ecological risk assessment is often applied to guide the decision-making process that underpins ecosystem-based management and prioritisation of risk factors for management. Several studies have recently used ecological risk assessment approaches to identify risk factors of greatest concern, but rarely are the underlying methodological decisions di...
Article
Full-text available
Harbours are a focus of intensive and diverse activities and thus have a high potential to become centres of conflict between users. Reviewing the multiple uses associated with harbours provides important insights into maritime communities and the management of conflict. In this paper, seven international, multi-disciplinary groups provide their ex...
Article
Plymouth Sound and adjacent estuaries, UK has been used as a working harbour throughout the ages and has a place in maritime history as the port from where the Pilgrim Fathers left for North America in 1620 on the Mayflower and Charles Darwin departed from on the HMS Beagle on his trip to Galapagos in 1831. Today, it remains a working harbour, home...
Article
Full-text available
Our oceans are heavily utilized by a wide variety of human activities that exert pressures which negatively impact marine ecosystems, occasionally leading to unsustainable rates of exploitation. A linkage framework approach can be used to make independent associations between sectors, activities, and the pressures they introduce. However, in realit...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem-based management (EBM) is promoted as the solution for sustainable use. An ecosystem-wide assessment methodology is therefore required. In this paper, we present an approach to assess the risk to ecosystem components from human activities common to marine and coastal ecosystems. We build on: (i) a linkage framework that describes how huma...
Article
Full-text available
Artificial structures can create novel habitat in the marine environment that has been associated with the spread of invasive species. They are often located in areas of high disturbance and can vary significantly in the area of free space provided for settlement of marine organisms. Whilst correlation between the amount of free space available and...
Data
The marine environment is heavily exploited, but unintentional consequences cause wide-ranging negative effects to its characteristics. Linkage frameworks (e.g., DPSIR [driver-pressure-state-impact-response]) are commonly used to describe an interaction between human activities and ecological characteristics of the ecosystem, but as each linkage is...
Article
Artificial coastal defence structures are proliferating in response to rising and stormier seas. These structures provide habitat for many species but generally support lower biodiversity than natural habitats. This is primarily due to the absence of environmental heterogeneity and water-retaining features on artificial structures. We compared the...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Dispersal is a primary driver in shaping the future distribution of species in both terrestrial and marine systems. Physical transport by advection can regulate the distance travelled and rate of propagule supply to a habitat but post-settlement processes such as predation can decouple supply from recruitment. The effect of flow-mediat...
Data
Comparison of the shell length (mean ± SD) of living and dead oysters in a cage containing one of five different predator combinations. Predator(s) had access to 10 oysters and each combination was replicated (n = 3). Letters indicate the species included in the treatment (B = blue crab Callinectes sapidus; M = mud crab Panopeus herbstii) and ‘+/−’...
Data
Logistic regression comparing the shell length of living and dead oysters. Oyster mortality estimated using five cage treatments containing varying predator identity combinations. + indicates predator inclusion, − indicates predator exclusion. B = Callinectes sapidus; M = Panopeus herbstii; C = open access to all predators. Each cage contained 10 o...
Article
Population characteristics such as body size and reproductive condition are widely used by industry and resource managers as criteria for harvesting commercial species. Given the broad-scale approaches commonly adopted by managers to evaluate stocks, any spatial heterogeneity in the structure and functioning of those stocks may result in inaccurate...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Terms of Reference for WGECO in 2011 were more diverse, and also more focused on responses to other groups within ICES than has been the case in some previous years. There was also a considerable overlap in scope between the ToR. As in previous years, there was considerable focus on the science needed to support the objectives of the Marine Str...
Article
Global climate change and invasive species represent two of the biggest threats to the environment. Biological communities are responding to global climate change through poleward shifts in distribution, and changes in abundance and phenology of both native and non-native species. An increase in the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events...
Article
A stock-recruitment model with a temperature component was used to estimate the effect of an increase in temperature predicted by climate change projections on population persistence and distribution of twaite shad Alosa fallax. An increase of 1 and 2° C above the current mean summer (June to August) water temperature of 17·8° C was estimated to re...
Article
Full-text available
The supply and successful settlement of larvae is vital for the development and persistence of populations of many marine species. Strongly influenced by hydrodynamic processes, the rate of supply affects the interaction between recruits. Population structure is determined by density-independent mortality when recruitment is limited, and by density...
Article
Full-text available
Larval transport is a key process in the life-history and population dynamics of many marine species. It is strongly influenced by ocean currents, but the influence of behavioural traits of larvae (e.g. vertical migration) on their advective dispersal is poorly understood. In the absence of field data, predictions of population connectivity are oft...

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