Antonio M Espín

Antonio M Espín
University of Granada | UGR · Departamento de Antropología Social

PhD

About

78
Publications
14,369
Reads
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933
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
University of Granada
Position
  • Fellow
June 2018 - September 2018
Universidad Loyola Andalucía
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2015 - September 2018
Middlesex University, UK
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (78)
Article
Full-text available
Costly punishment of cheaters who contribute little or nothing to a cooperating group has been extensively studied, as an effective means to enforce cooperation. The prevailing view is that individuals use punishment to retaliate against transgressions of moral standards such as fairness or equity. However, there is much debate regarding the psycho...
Preprint
Full-text available
It is documented that fetal exposure to sexual hormones has long lasting effects on human behavior. The second-to-fourth digit ratio (DR) is a putative marker for prenatal exposure to testosterone (compared to estrogens) while in uterus, with higher relative exposure to testosterone resulting in a lower DR. Although the existing literature document...
Article
Full-text available
Human decisions in the social domain are modulated by the interaction between intuitive and reflective processes. Requiring individuals to decide quickly or slowly triggers these processes and is thus likely to elicit different social behaviors. Meanwhile, time pressure has been associated with inefficiency in market settings and market regulation...
Preprint
Full-text available
Humans often punish non-cooperators in one-shot interactions among genetically-unrelated individuals. This so-called altruistic punishment poses an evolutionary puzzle because it enforces cooperation norms that benefit the whole group, but is costly for the punisher. Under the "big mistake" (or "mismatch") hypothesis, social behaviors such as punis...
Preprint
Full-text available
Previous studies have shown that women tend to be more egalitarian and less self-interested than men whereas men tend to be more concerned with social efficiency motives. The roots of such differences, however, remain unknown. Since different cognitive styles have also been associated with different distributional social preferences, we hypothesise...
Article
Full-text available
We report data from an online experiment which allows us to study how generosity changed over a 6-day period during the initial explosive growth of the COVID-19 pandemic in Andalusia, Spain, while the country was under a strict lockdown. Participants ( n = 969) could donate a fraction of a €100 prize to an unknown charity. Our data are particularly...
Article
There is much debate as to why economics students display more self-interested behavior than other students: whether homo economicus self-select into economics or students are instead “indoctrinated” by economics learning, and whether these effects impact on preferences or beliefs about others’ behavior. Using a classroom survey (n>500) with novel...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human decisions in the social domain are modulated by the interaction between intuitive and reflective processes. Requiring individuals to decide quickly or slowly triggers these processes and is thus likely to elicit different social behaviors. Meanwhile, time pressure has been associated with inefficiency in market settings and market regulation...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is much debate as to why economics students display more self-interested behavior than other students: whether homo economicus self-select into economics or students are instead "indoctrinated" by economics learning, and whether these effects impact on preferences or beliefs about others' behavior. Using a classroom survey (n>500) with novel...
Article
There is an intense debate whether risk-taking behavior is partially driven by cognitive abilities. The critical issue is whether choices arising from subjects with lower cognitive abilities are more likely driven by errors or lack of understanding than pure preferences for risk. The latter implies that the often-argued link between risk preference...
Article
Full-text available
There is much debate as to why economics students display more self-interested behavior than other students: whether homo economicus self-select into economics or students are instead “indoctrinated” by economics learning, and whether these effects impact on preferences or beliefs about others’ behavior. Using a classroom survey (n>500) with novel...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies have shown that women tend to be more egalitarian and less self-interested than men whereas men tend to be more concerned with social efficiency motives. The roots of such differences, however, remain unknown. Since different cognitive styles have also been associated with different distributional social preferences, we hypothesise...
Preprint
Full-text available
The use of hypothetical instead of real decision-making incentives remains under debate after decades of economic experiments. Standard incentivized experiments involve substantial monetary costs due to participants' earnings and often logistic costs as well. In time preferences experiments, which involve future payments, real payments are particul...
Article
Full-text available
Este artículo estudia el papel de las características sociodemográficas y las preferencias sociales sobre el comportamiento generoso. Utilizando una muestra (n=792) heterogénea representativa de la ciudad de Granada y el juego del dictador se investiga qué mecanismos trabajan sobre la decisión de donar dinero a otras personas anónimas y sobre la de...
Preprint
Children as young as 3-4 years are already concerned about inequality and declare that equality is a norm that should be followed. From 3 to 8 years they develop a strong preference for equality, which is typically reflected in both “envy” and “compassion”, that is, aversion to disadvantageous and advantageous inequality, respectively4. Further stu...
Preprint
The Covid-19 pandemic has caused over 36k deaths worldwide, generating a public debate about how exposure to a pandemic environment affects social behavior: along with signs of increased solidarity, we also observe antisocial behaviors. Using data from an online experiment with ~1k participants from southern Spain, we study how social behavior evol...
Preprint
Full-text available
An evolutionary account for the existence of individual differences in temporal discounting (i.e., the orientation to the short-vs. the long-run) establishes that harsh socio-ecological conditions lead individuals to adaptively focus on the short-run, whereas more secure environments lead to the development of more future-oriented life-history stra...
Experiment Findings
There is an intense debate whether decision making under uncertainty is partially driven by cognitive abilities. The critical issue is whether choices arising from subjects with lower cognitive abilities are more likely driven by errors or lack of understanding than pure preferences for risk. The latter implies that the often argued link between ri...
Article
Prenatal exposure to sex hormones exerts organizational effects on the brain which have observable behavioural correlates in adult life. There are reasons to expect that social behaviours-fundamental for the evolutionary success of humans-might be related to biological factors such as prenatal sex hormone exposure. Nevertheless, the existing litera...
Preprint
Full-text available
Humans often punish non-cooperators in one-shot interactions among genetically-unrelated individuals. So-called altruistic punishment poses an evolutionary puzzle because it enforces a cooperation norm that benefits the whole group, but is costly for the punisher. Under the "big mistake" (or "mismatch") hypothesis, social behavior such as punishmen...
Article
Full-text available
There is an intense debate whether decision making under uncertainty is partially driven by cognitive abilities. The critical issue is whether choices arising from subjects with lower cognitive abilities are more likely driven by errors or lack of understanding than pure preferences for risk. The latter implies that the often argued link between ri...
Article
Humans differ greatly in their tendency to discount future events, but the reasons underlying such inter-in-dividual differences remain poorly understood. Based on the evolutionary framework of Life History Theory, influential models predict that the extent to which individuals discount the future should be influenced by socio-ecological factors su...
Preprint
Full-text available
Humans differ greatly in their tendency to discount future events, but the reasons underlying such inter-individual differences remain poorly understood. The evolutionary framework of Life History Theory predicts that the extent to which individuals discount the future should be influenced by socio-ecological factors such as mortality risk, environ...
Article
Full-text available
Mounting evidence shows that people's self-reported life satisfaction (LS) is negatively related to income inequality. Under the interpretation of LS as a proxy for utility in the context of social preferences, this finding indicates that individuals display inequality-averse preferences. We explore the relationship between self-reports on inequali...
Article
Full-text available
Public and private organizations are increasingly applying behavioral economics methods to a variety of issues such as mechanism design and incentive architecture. However, there has been little focus on how experimental tools used in behavioral economics can help companies learn more about their (current or prospective) workforce and, more specifi...
Article
Full-text available
Patience—low delay discounting—has been shown to predict cooperative behavior in environments where cooperation demands the suppression of competitive aspirations. But what about intergroup-conflict situations, where within-group cooperation is importantly motivated by competitive sentiments against other groups? We analyze the connection between d...
Article
Full-text available
Human decision making in the social domain is modulated by the interaction between fast (intuitive) and slow (reflective) processes. Forcing individuals to decide quickly, versus slowly, is likely to elicit different social behaviors. Similarly, individual choices may also depend on the time others’ have for decision making. This aspect of human be...
Article
Trust in our partners is important for economic transactions, but time pressure might affect the level of trust we place in others. This column reports the results of an experimental game in which individuals choose how much trust to place in partners who either must respond instinctively, or have time to reflect. Less-reflective personality types...
Article
Full-text available
Recent experiments suggest that social behavior may be shaped by the time available for decision making. It is known that fast decision making relies more on intuition whereas slow decision making is affected by reflective processes. Little is known, however, about whether people correctly anticipate the effect of intuition vs. reflection on others...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a "second generation" theory on the nature of social preferences. Incorporating an inter-temporal ingredient, we generate an outcome-based model which focuses on the conflict between cooperation towards social efficiency and competition for the individual relative standing. We build on the argument that cooperative (competitive)...
Article
Full-text available
In an anonymous 4-person economic game, participants contributed more money to a common project (i.e., cooperated) when required to decide quickly than when forced to delay their decision (Rand, Greene & Nowak, 2012), a pattern consistent with the “social heuristics” hypothesis proposed by Rand and colleagues. The results of studies using time pres...
Data
The Supplementary Information includes details about the theoretical model, the statistical analysis, and the experimental instructions.
Article
Full-text available
Groups make decisions on both the production and the distribution of resources. These decisions typically involve a tension between increasing the total level of group resources (i.e. social efficiency) and distributing these resources among group members (i.e. individuals' relative shares). This is the case because the redistribution process may d...
Article
Full-text available
In an anonymous 4-person economic game, participants contributed more money to a common project (i.e., cooperated) when required to decide quickly than when forced to delay their decision (Rand, Greene & Nowak, 2012), a pattern consistent with the “social heuristics” hypothesis proposed by Rand and colleagues. The results of studies using time pres...
Article
Groups make decisions on both the production and the distribution of resources. These decisions typically involve a tension between increasing the total level of group resources (i.e. social efficiency) and distributing these resources among group members (i.e. individuals' relative shares). This is the case because the redistribution process may d...
Article
Full-text available
In this Research Topic, a collection of research and review articles contribute to our understanding of the factors influencing human prosocial and antisocial behavior in economic games. Under the labels of “prosocial” and “antisocial” behavior we consider all those actions that help or hurt others, respectively. While the prosocial, bright side of...
Article
Full-text available
Two sources of information most relevant to guide social decision making are the cooperative tendencies associated with different people and their facial emotional displays. This electrophysiological experiment aimed to study how the use of personal identity and emotional expressions as cues impacts different stages of face processing and their pot...
Article
Full-text available
Organizations crucially need the creative talent of millennials but are reluctant to hire them because of their supposed lack of diligence. Recent studies have shown that hiring diligent millennials requires selecting those who score high on the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) and thus rely on effortful thinking rather than intuition. A central que...
Article
Previous research suggests that social comparisons affect decision making under uncertainty. However, the role of the length of the social interaction for this relationship remains unknown. This experiment tests the effect of social comparisons on financial risk taking and how this effect is modulated by whether social encounters are sporadic or re...
Article
Full-text available
Groups make decisions on both the production and the distribution of resources. These decisions typically involve a tension between increasing the total level of group resources (i.e. social efficiency) and distributing these resources among group members (i.e. individuals' relative shares). This is the case because the redistribution process may d...
Article
Full-text available
Trustful and trustworthy behaviors have important externalities for the society. But what exactly drives people to behave in a trustful and trustworthy manner? Building on research suggesting that individuals’ social preferences might be a common factor informing both behaviors, we study the impact of a set of different motives on individuals’ choi...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past few decades obesity has become one of the largest public policy concerns among the adult population in the developed world. Obesity and overweight are hypothesized to affect individuals' sociability through a number of channels, including discrimination and low self-esteem. However, whether these effects translate into differential be...
Article
Full-text available
Even though human social behavior has received considerable scientific attention in the last decades, its cognitive underpinnings are still poorly understood. Applying a dual-process framework to the study of social preferences, we show in two studies that individuals with a more reflective/deliberative cognitive style, as measured by scores on the...
Article
Full-text available
We present results from two studies that show a positive relation between cognitive reflection and trusting behavior, but no significant relation with trustworthy behavior. Our finding holds regardless of individual distributional social preferences and risk aversion. Our results add to a growing body of literature that illustrates the role of cogn...
Article
Full-text available
The ultimatum game (UG) is widely used to study human bargaining behavior and fairness norms. In this game, two players have to agree on how to split a sum of money. The proposer makes an offer, which the responder can accept or reject. If the responder rejects, neither player gets anything. The prevailing view is that, beyond self-interest, the de...
Article
Full-text available
The ultimatum game (UG) is widely used to study human bargaining behavior and fairness norms. In this game, two players have to agree on how to split a sum of money. The proposer makes an offer, which the responder can accept or reject. If the responder rejects, neither player gets anything. The prevailing view is that, beyond self-interest, the de...
Chapter
Full-text available
Relative positioning refers to the concern of agents regarding how their performance compares to that of others. Conventional economic models are based on agents that behave as if they were maximizing the absolute amount of a desirable good...
Article
Patience—low delay discounting—has been shown to predict cooperative behavior in environments where cooperation demands the suppression of competitive aspirations. But what about intergroup-conflict situations, where within-group cooperation is importantly motivated by competitive sentiments against other groups? We analyze the connection between d...
Article
Full-text available
This study explores the relationship between several personal religion-related variables and social behaviour, using three paradigmatic economic games: the dictator (DG), ultimatum (UG), and trust (TG) games. A large carefully designed sample of the urban adult population in Granada (Spain) is employed (N=766). From participants’ decisions in these...