Antonio Criscuolo

Antonio Criscuolo
Maastricht University | UM · Department of Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology

Master of Science

About

11
Publications
1,800
Reads
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34
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
34 Citations
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Introduction
PhD candidate in Cognitive Neuroscience at Maastricht University, under supervision of Prof. Sonja Kotz and Prof. Michael Schwartze. We investigate how neural oscillations encode and predict the timing of auditory rhythms, so to allow adaptation to dynamic environments. We further explore the functional link between biological rhythms (i.e. respiratory and cardiac activity) and endogenous neural activity. Neural oscillations, cooking, sports, friends. Key word: Carpe diem.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - July 2019
University of Oxford
Position
  • Research Intern
Description
  • Investigating neural correlates of developmental stuttering with a variety of imaging techniques, as MEG, fMRI, TMS, tDCS, under the supervision of Prof. Kate Watkins.
February 2018 - July 2018
Aarhus University
Position
  • Research Assistant
March 2017 - June 2017
Aarhus University
Position
  • Research Intern
Description
  • Neuroplasticity mechanisms associated with musical training at neuroanatomical, functional and cognitive levels under the supervision of Prof. Elvira Brattico.
Education
August 2017 - October 2019
Maastricht University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
September 2015 - July 2017
University of Bologna
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2008 - July 2013
Conservatorio di Musica G. Martucci, Salerno, Italy
Field of study
  • Bassoon

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Through long-term training, music experts acquire complex and specialized sensorimotor skills, which are paralleled by continuous neuro-anatomical and -functional adaptations. The underlying neuroplasticity mechanisms have been extensively explored in decades of research in music, cognitive, and translational neuroscience. However, the absence of a...
Article
Continuous interactions between physiological body–brain rhythms influence how individuals act, perceive, and evaluate their environment. Despite increasing interest, the intricate interface between breathing, cardiac, neural rhythms, and cognitive function remains poorly understood. By evaluating current theoretical and empirical implications, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Through long-term training, music experts acquire complex and specialized sensorimotor skills, which are paralleled by continuous neuro-anatomical and -functional adaptations. The underlying neuroplasticity mechanisms have been extensively explored in decades of research in music, cognitive, and translational neuroscience. However, the absence of a...
Preprint
Full-text available
When sensory input conveys rhythmic regularity, we are able to form predictions about the timing of upcoming events. Although rhythm processing capacities can differ considerably between individuals, these differences are often obscured by subject- and trial-level data averaging procedures in M/EEG research. Here, instead, we systematically assesse...
Article
Full-text available
Converging evidence has demonstrated that musical training is associated with improved perceptual and cognitive skills, including executive functions and general intelligence, particularly in childhood. In contrast, in adults the relationship between cognitive performance and musicianship is less clear and seems to be modulated by a number of backg...
Poster
Full-text available
Musicians display larger grey matter volumes in brain structures related to auditory processing and fine motor control

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
We are interested in unravelling the functional mechanisms underlying the bidirectional and continuous interactions between physiological rhythms of the body and the brain. In particular, we aim to provide a dynamic perspective on how breathing and cardiac signals interface with neural rhythms to modulate human behavior across multiple domains, from information processing to perception and action. This holistic approach to the study of brain functions promises to improve our understanding of how individuals efficiently act in and adapt to a dynamically changing environment, from neurotypical to pathological populations.
Project
This project aims at deepening our understanding of if and how we exploit temporal information, predictions and attention to foster rhythm processing. In particular, we perform translational and comparative research investigating the functional role of sensorimotor neural dynamics and audio-motor coupling in rhythm cognition. For doing so, we record brain electrophysiology data and manipulate participants’ temporal (when) and formal (what) expectations, as well as the deployment of attentional resources to stimuli. Next, we analytically explore the neural processes which allow for (i) internalizing the timing of external events, (ii) track and synchronize to external rhythms, (iii) generate temporal predictions and (iv) extract hierarchical meter (or beat) structures. Thus, we target delta- and beta-band oscillations, investigate their functional interactions in time (cross-frequency coupling) and space (audio-motor coupling) and causally probe their involvement in rhythm cognition by modulating their phase-locking via non-invasive brain stimulation.
Project
We are interested in the ability to successfully navigate through, and interact with, an ever-changing dynamic environment. We investigate the mechanisms which allow adequate timing and adaptation to the rate and rhythm of events in the environment using behavioural and neuroimaging techniques. As inadequate timing factors into the neurofunctional profile of different patient populations, we use our findings to develop strategies for compensation. Such translational approach towards clinical applications is further informed by comparative research with animal models (rodent, macaque monkey) and lesion-symptom mapping studies.