Antonio N Calabrese

Antonio N Calabrese
University of Leeds · Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology (ACSMB)

PhD

About

53
Publications
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
Correct folding of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria depends on delivery of unfolded OMPs to the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM). How unfolded substrates are presented to BAM remains elusive, but the major OMP chaperone SurA is proposed to play a key role. Here, we have used hydrogen deuterium exchan...
Preprint
The ability of broadly neutralising antibodies to target conserved epitopes gives them huge potential as antibody-based therapeutics, particularly in the face of constant viral antigen evolution. Certain bovine antibodies are highly adept at binding conserved, glycosylated epitopes, courtesy of their ultralong complementarity determining region (CD...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance MscL gates in response to membrane tension changes. Lipid removal from transmembrane pockets leads to a concerted structural and functional MscL response, but it remains unknown whether there is a correlation between the tension-mediated state and the state derived by pocket delipidation in the...
Article
Full-text available
Rotavirus genomes are distributed between 11 distinct RNA molecules, all of which must be selectively copackaged during virus assembly. This likely occurs through sequence-specific RNA interactions facilitated by the RNA chaperone NSP2. Here, we report that NSP2 autoregulates its chaperone activity through its C-terminal region (CTR) that promotes...
Article
Full-text available
The folding of β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in Gram-negative bacteria is catalysed by the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM). How lateral opening in the β-barrel of the major subunit BamA assists in OMP folding, and the contribution of membrane disruption to BAM catalysis remain unresolved. Here, we use an anti-BamA monoclonal antibody fr...
Preprint
Full-text available
The MscL channel gates in response to membrane tension changes to allow the exchange of molecules through its pore. Lipid removal from transmembrane pockets leads to a MscL response. However, it is unknown whether there is correlation between the tension mediated state and the state derived by pocket delipidation in the absence of tension. Transiti...
Chapter
Native mass spectrometry and native ion mobility mass spectrometry are now established techniques in structural biology, with recent work developing these methods for the study of integral membrane proteins reconstituted in both lipid bilayer and detergent environments. Here we show how native mass spectrometry can be used to interrogate integral m...
Article
Full-text available
Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and regions of intrinsic disorder (IDRs) are abundant in proteomes and are essential for many biological processes. Thus, they are often implicated in disease mechanisms, including neurodegeneration and cancer. The flexible nature of IDPs and IDRs provides many advantages, including (but not limited to) over...
Article
Full-text available
The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) catalyses the folding and insertion of β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) into the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria by mechanisms that remain unclear. Here, we present an ensemble of cryoEM structures of the E. coli BamABCDE (BAM) complex in lipid nanodiscs, determined using multi-body refinement...
Preprint
Full-text available
Rotavirus genomes are distributed between 11 distinct RNA segments, all of which are essential for virus replication. Stoichiometric genome segment selection and assembly is achieved through a series of sequence-specific, intersegment RNA-RNA interactions that are facilitated by the rotavirus RNA chaperone protein NSP2. The C-terminal region (CTR)...
Article
Full-text available
Antibiotic resistance in clinically important bacteria can be mediated by target protection mechanisms, whereby a protein binds to the drug target and protects it from the inhibitory effects of the antibiotic. The most prevalent source of clinical resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) is expression of the FusB family of proteins that bind...
Article
Full-text available
The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) inserts outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMPs) in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In Enterobacteriacea, BAM also mediates export of the stress sensor lipoprotein RcsF to the cell surface by assembling RcsF–OMP complexes. Here, we report the crystal structure of the key BAM component BamA in compl...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical crosslinking‐mass spectrometry (XL‐MS) is a valuable technique for gaining insights into protein structure and the organization of macromolecular complexes. XL‐MS data yields inter‐residue restraints that can be compared with high‐resolution structural data. Distances greater than the crosslinker spacer‐arm can reveal lowly‐populated “exci...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chemical crosslinking-mass spectrometry (XL-MS) is a valuable technique for gaining insights into protein structure and the organization of macromolecular complexes. XL-MS data yields inter-residue restraints that can be compared with high-resolution structural data. Distances greater than the crosslinker spacer-arm can reveal lowly-populated 'exci...
Article
Full-text available
The periplasmic chaperone SurA plays a key role in outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis. E. coli SurA comprises a core domain and two peptidylprolyl isomerase domains (P1 and P2), but its mechanisms of client binding and chaperone function have remained unclear. Here, we use chemical cross-linking, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry,...
Preprint
Full-text available
The periplasmic chaperone SurA plays a key role in outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis. E. coli SurA comprises a core domain and two peptidylprolyl isomerase domains (P1 and P2), but how it binds its OMP clients and the mechanism(s) of its chaperone action remain unclear. Here, we have used chemical cross-linking, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, s...
Preprint
The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) inserts outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMPs) in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In Enterobacteriacea, BAM also mediates export of the stress sensor lipoprotein RcsF to the cell surface by assembling RcsF-OMP complexes. Although BAM has been the focus of intense research due to its essential act...
Article
Full-text available
Transient oligomers are commonly formed in the early stages of amyloid assembly. Determining the structure(s) of these species and defining their role(s) in assembly is key to devising new routes to control disease. Here, using a combination of chemical kinetics, NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods, we identify and structurally character...
Article
Full-text available
The nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) is a conserved ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factor. Whether NAC exerts chaperone activity and whether this function is restricted to de novo protein synthesis is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that NAC directly exerts chaperone activity toward structurally diverse model substrates including...
Article
SurA is a conserved ATP-independent periplasmic chaperone involved in the biogenesis of outer-membrane proteins (OMPs). Escherichia coli SurA has a core domain and two peptidylprolyl isomerase (PPIase) domains, the role(s) of which remain unresolved. Here we show that while SurA homologues in early proteobacteria typically contain one or no PPIase...
Article
Full-text available
Analysing protein complexes by chemical crosslinking‐mass spectrometry (XL‐MS) is limited by the side‐chain reactivities and sizes of available crosslinkers, their slow reaction rates, and difficulties in crosslink enrichment, especially for rare, transient or dynamic complexes. Here we describe two new XL reagents that incorporate a methanethiosul...
Article
Full-text available
Analysing protein complexes by chemical crosslinking‐mass spectrometry (XL‐MS) is limited by the side‐chain reactivities and sizes of available crosslinkers, their slow reaction rates, and difficulties in crosslink enrichment, especially for rare, transient or dynamic complexes. Here we describe two new XL reagents that incorporate a methanethiosul...
Article
Full-text available
To maintain genome integrity, segmented double-stranded RNA viruses of the Reoviridae family must accurately select and package a complete set of up to a dozen distinct genomic RNAs. It is thought that the high fidelity segmented genome assembly involves multiple sequence-specific RNA–RNA interactions between single-stranded RNA segment precursors....
Preprint
Full-text available
To maintain genome integrity, segmented double-stranded RNA viruses of the Reoviridae family must accurately select and package a complete set of up to a dozen distinct genomic RNAs. It is thought that the high fidelity segmented genome assembly involves multiple sequence-specific RNA-RNA interactions between single-stranded RNA segment precursors....
Article
Amyloid fibrils are highly ordered, β-sheet rich forms of aggregated peptides and proteins that are associated with a variety of pathological human disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Amyloid fibril-forming peptides may be functionally related to antimicrobial peptides, despite differing significantly in sequence and structur...
Article
Full-text available
The last ∼25 years has seen mass spectrometry (MS) emerge as an integral method in the structural biology toolkit. In particular, MS has enabled the structural characterization of proteins and protein assemblies that have been intractable by other methods, especially those that are large, heterogeneous or transient, providing experimental evidence...
Article
Full-text available
The biogenesis of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in Gram-negative bacteria involves delivery by periplasmic chaperones to the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) which catalyses OMP insertion into the outer membrane (OM). Here, we examine the effects of membrane thickness, the E. coli periplasmic chaperones Skp and SurA, and BamA, the central subunit...
Article
Full-text available
Cys accessibility and quantitative intact mass spectrometry (MS) analyses have been devised to study the topological transitions of Mhp1, the membrane protein for sodium-linked transport of hydantoins from Microbacterium liquefaciens. Mhp1 has been crystallised in three forms (outward-facing open, outward-facing occluded with substrate bound, and i...
Article
Full-text available
Collision cross-section (CCS) measurements obtained from ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) analyses often provide useful information concerning a protein’s size and shape and can be complemented by modeling procedures. However, there have been some concerns about the extent to which certain proteins maintain a native-like conform...
Article
Full-text available
The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is a ~203 kDa complex of five proteins (BamA-E) which is essential for viability in E. coli. BAM promotes the folding and insertion of β-barrel proteins into the outer membrane via a poorly understood mechanism. Several current models suggest that BAM functions through a ‘lateral gating’ motion of the β-barrel...
Article
Full-text available
The trimeric chaperone Skp sequesters outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) within a hydrophobic cage, thereby preventing their aggregation during transport across the periplasm in Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we studied the interaction between Escherichia coli Skp and five OMPs of varying size. Investigations of the kinetics of OMP folding revealed that...
Article
Full-text available
Amphipols are a class of novel surfactants that are capable of stabilizing the native state of membrane proteins. They have been shown to be highly effective, in some cases more so than detergent micelles, at maintaining the structural integrity of membrane proteins in solution, and have shown promise as vehicles for delivering native membrane prot...
Article
The amphibian skin is a vast resource for bioactive peptides, which form the basis of the animals' innate immune system. Key components of the secretions of the cutaneous glands are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which exert their cytotoxic effects often as a result of membrane disruption. It is becoming increasingly evident that there is a link be...
Article
The amphibian host-defense peptide caerin 1.8 [(1)GLFKVLGSV(10)AKHLLPHVVP(20)VIAEKL(NH2)] inhibits fibril formation of amyloid β 1-42 [(1)DAEFRHDSG(10)YEVHHQKLVF(20)FAEDVGSNKG(30)AIIGLMVGGV(40)VIA] [Aβ42] (the major precursor of the extracellular fibrillar deposits of Alzheimer's disease). Some truncated forms of caerin 1.8 also inhibit fibril form...
Article
Full-text available
Membrane proteins (MPs) are essential for numerous important biological processes. Recently, mass spectrometry (MS), coupled with an array of related techniques, has been used to probe the structural properties of MPs and their complexes. Typically, detergent micelles have been employed for delivering MPs into the gas-phase, but these complexes hav...
Article
Full-text available
Characterisation of the conformational states adopted during protein folding, including globally unfolded/disordered structures and partially folded intermediate species, is vital to gain fundamental insights into how a protein folds. In this work we employ fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) to map the structural changes that occur in...
Article
Full-text available
Non-covalent mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as an invaluable technique to probe the structure, interactions and dynamics of membrane proteins (MPs). However, maintaining native-like MP conformations in the gas phase using detergent solubilised proteins is often challenging and may limit structural analysis. Amphipols, such as the well character...
Article
Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous protein in nature and plays a regulatory role in numerous biological processes, including the upregulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in vivo. Several peptides that prevent NO production by interacting with CaM have been isolated in the cutaneous secretions of Australian amphibians, and are thought to serve as a...
Article
Full-text available
Amphipols are short amphipathic polymers that can substitute for detergents at the hydrophobic surface of membrane proteins (MPs), keeping them soluble in the absence of detergents while stabilizing them. The most widely used amphipol, known as A8-35, is comprised of a polyacrylic acid (PAA) main chain grafted with octylamine and isopropylamine. Am...
Article
The accumulation of protein aggregates containing amyloid fibrils, with α-synuclein being the main component, is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Molecules which prevent the formation of amyloid fibrils or disassociate the toxic aggregates are touted as promising strategies to prevent or treat PD. In the present study, in vitro...
Article
Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a protein with high structural and sequence similarity to insulin. Unlike insulin, it binds both the type 1 IGF receptor and the exon 11- isoform of the insulin receptor with high affinity. The overexpression and up regulation of IGF-II has been associated with the progression of various forms of cancer. Th...
Article
It has been shown that the disulfide moiety in the chemical cross-linking reagent dithiobis(succinimidyl)propionate (DSP), which is similar in structure to the natural cystine disulfide, cleaves preferentially to the peptide backbone in the negative ion mode. However, the tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra of peptides in the negative ion mode are often do...
Article
Full-text available
Cellular functions are performed and regulated at a molecular level by the coordinated action of intricate protein assemblies, and hence the study of protein folding, structure, and interactions is vital to the appreciation and understanding of complex biological problems. In the past decade, continued development of chemical cross-linking methodol...
Article
An experimental study has shown that the structure of a β' ion proposed earlier is incorrect. Backbone cleavage β' anions have structures R(NH(-)) from systems [[RNHCH(X)CONHCH(Y)CO(2)H (or C-terminal CONH(2))-H](-) (where R is the rest of the peptide molecule and X and Y represent the α side chains of the individual amino acid residues). Ab initio...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical tool used to elucidate the topologies of proteins and protein complexes. However, identification of the low abundance cross-linked peptides and modification sites amongst a large quantity of proteolytic fragments remains challenging. In this work, we present a strategy to...
Article
This study demonstrates the ability of travelling wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry to measure collision cross-sections of ions in the negative mode, using a calibration based approach. Here, negative mode ion mobility-mass spectrometry was utilised to understand structural transitions of calmodulin upon Ca2+ binding and complexation with model p...
Article
Anuran peptides which contain His, including caerin 1.8 (GLFKVLGSVAKHLLPHVVPVIAEKL-NH(2)), caerin 1.2 (GLLGVLGSVAKHVLPHVVPVIAEHL-NH(2)), Ala(15) maculatin 1.1 (GLFGVLAKVAAHVVAIEHF-NH(2)), fallaxidin 4.1 (GLLSFLPKVIGHLIHPPS-OH), riparin 5.1 (IVSYPDDAGEHAHKMG-NH(2)) and signiferin 2.1 (IIGHLIKTALGMLGL-NH(2)), all form MMet(2+) and (M + Met(2+)-2H(+))...

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Project (1)
Project
The goal of the project is to understand how RcsF senses the stress and how the signal is transduced.