Antonia F Hamilton

Antonia F Hamilton
University College London | UCL · Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience

PhD

About

199
Publications
57,749
Reads
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11,702
Citations
Introduction
I'm a social-developmental-motor-cognitive-neuroscientist trying to figure out how people interact ... To contact me or see my up-to-date full text papers, visit my real website http://www.antoniahamilton.com I don't reply to ResearchGate messages - use email to contact me.
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
University College London
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
June 2007 - July 2013
University of Nottingham
January 2006 - December 2008
Dartmouth College

Publications

Publications (199)
Article
Full-text available
Despite the recent increase in second-person neuroscience research, it is still hard to understand which neurocognitive mechanisms underlie real-time social behaviours. Here, we propose that social signalling can help us understand social interactions both at the single- and two-brain level in terms of social signal exchanges between senders and re...
Article
Significance: There is a longstanding recommendation within the field of fNIRS to use oxygenated ( HbO 2 ) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin when analyzing and interpreting results. Despite this, many fNIRS studies do focus on HbO 2 only. Previous work has shown that HbO 2 on its own is susceptible to systemic interference and results may mostly re...
Article
Full-text available
People with a depressed mood tend to perform poorly on executive function tasks, which require much of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), an area of the brain which has also been shown to be hypo-active in this population. Recent research has suggested that these aspects of cognition might be improved through physical activity and cognitive training. How...
Article
Full-text available
Nonverbal communication is an important part of human communication, including head nodding, eye gaze, proximity and body orientation. Recent research has identified specific patterns of head nodding linked to conversation, namely mimicry of head movements at 600ms delay and fast nodding when listening. In this paper, we implemented these head nodd...
Article
Background Conventional paradigms in clinical neuroscience tend to be constrained in terms of ecological validity, raising several challenges to studying the mechanisms mediating treatments and outcomes in clinical settings. Addressing these issues requires real-world neuroimaging techniques that are capable of continuously collecting data during f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Nonverbal cues have multiple roles in social encounters, with gaze behaviour facilitating interactions and conversational flow. In this work, we explore the conversation dynamics in dyadic settings in a free-flow discussion. Using automatic analysis (rather than manual labelling), we investigate how the gaze behaviour of one person is related to ho...
Article
Human learning is highly social.1, 2, 3 Advances in technology have increasingly moved learning online, and the recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has accelerated this trend. Online learning can vary in terms of how “socially” the material is presented (e.g., live or recorded), but there are limited data on which is most effective,...
Article
Full-text available
In everyday life, people sometimes find themselves making decisions on behalf of others, taking risks on another’s behalf, accepting the responsibility for these choices and possibly suffering regret for what they could have done differently. Previous research has extensively studied how people deal with risk when making decisions for others or whe...
Article
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Previous studies (Haswell et al. in Nat Neurosci 12:970–972, 2009; Marko et al. in Brain J Neurol 138:784–797, 2015) reported that people with autism rely less on vision for learning to reach in a force field. This suggested a possibility that they have difficulties in extracting force information from visual motion signals, a process called invers...
Article
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Pairs of participants mutually communicated (or not) biographical information to each other. By combining simultaneous eye-tracking, face-tracking and functional near-infrared spectroscopy, we examined how this mutual sharing of information modulates social signalling and brain activity. When biographical information was disclosed, participants dir...
Article
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The tendency to imitate the actions of others appears to be a fundamental aspect of human social interaction. Emotional expressions are a particularly salient form of social stimuli (Vuilleumier & Schwartz, 2001) but their relationship to imitative behaviour is currently unclear. In this paper we report the results of five studies which investigate...
Article
Human learning is highly social. Advances in technology have increasingly moved learning online, and the recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has accelerated this trend. Online learning can vary in terms of how “socially” the material is presented (e.g., live or recorded), but there are limited data on which is most effective, with t...
Article
Full-text available
In a busy space, people encounter many other people with different viewpoints, but classic studies of perspective-taking examine only one agent at a time. This paper explores the issue of selectivity in visual perspective-taking (VPT) when different people are available to interact with. We consider the hypothesis that humanization impacts on VPT i...
Article
Hyperscanning—the recording of brain activity from multiple individuals—can be hard to interpret. This paper shows how integrating behavioral data and mutual prediction models into hyperscanning studies can lead to advances in embodied social neuroscience.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Modelling of the breath signal is of high interest to both healthcare professionals and computer scientists, as a source of diagnosis-related information, or a means for curating higher quality datasets in speech analysis research. The formation of a breath signal gold standard is, however, not a straightforward task, as it requires specialised equ...
Article
Full-text available
There is a growing consensus that our most fundamental sense of self is structured by the ongoing integration of sensory and motor information related to our own body. Depersonalisation (DP) is an intriguing form of altered subjective experience in which people report feelings of unreality and detachment from their sense of self. The current study...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The INTERSPEECH 2020 Computational Paralinguistics Challenge addresses three different problems for the first time in a research competition under well-defined conditions: In the Elderly Emotion Sub-Challenge, arousal and valence in the speech of elderly individuals have to be modelled as a 3-class problem; in the Breathing Sub-Challenge, breathing...
Article
Full-text available
Lay abstract: When we are communicating with other people, we exchange a variety of social signals through eye gaze and facial expressions. However, coordinated exchanges of these social signals can only happen when people involved in the interaction are able to see each other. Although previous studies report that autistic individuals have diffic...
Article
Full-text available
Mimicry is suggested to be one of the strategies via which we enhance social affiliation. Although recent studies have shown that, like adults, young children selectively mimic the facial actions of in-group over out-group members, it is unknown whether this early mimicry behavior is driven by affiliative motivations. Here we investigated the funct...
Article
Full-text available
The “Choose a Movie‐CAM” is an established task to quantify the motivation for seeking social rewards. It allows participants to directly assess both the stimulus value and the effort required to obtain it. In the present study we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms of such cost‐benefit decision‐making. To this end, functional Magnetic Resonanc...
Article
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Anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC; Brodmann area 10) activations are often, but not always, found in neuroimaging studies investigating deception, and the precise role of this area remains unclear. To explore the role of PFC in face-to-face deception, we invited pairs of participants to play a card game involving lying and lie detection while we used...
Preprint
Hyperscanning has been hailed as a game-changing method which will allow us to understand the neuroscience of multi-person social interactions and create ‘second person neuroscience’. Here, I present a critical review of fNIRS hyperscanning studies, examining what they can and cannot tell us about social neuroscience. A key problem is that many cur...
Article
Full-text available
Conversation between two people involves subtle nonverbal coordination in addition to speech. However, the precise parameters and timing of this coordination remain unclear, which limits our ability to theorize about the neural and cognitive mechanisms of social coordination. In particular, it is unclear if conversation is dominated by synchronizat...
Article
Full-text available
The default mode network (DMN) is a network of brain regions that is activated while we are not engaged in any particular task. While there is a large volume of research documenting functional connectivity within the DMN in adults, knowledge of the development of this network is still limited. There is some evidence for a gradual increase in the fu...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding other people’s emotional states involves integrating multiple sources of information, such as someone’s smile (affective cue) with our knowledge that they have passed an exam (situational cue). We explored whether autistic adults display differences in how they integrate these cues by showing participants videos of students receiving...
Article
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Background: One of the main diagnostic features of individuals with autism spectrum disorders is nonverbal behaviour difficulties during naturalistic social interactions. The 'Interactional Heterogeneity Hypothesis' of ASD proposes that the degree to which individuals share a common ground substantially influences their ability to achieve smooth s...
Preprint
In a busy space, people encounter many other people with different viewpoints, but classic studies of VPT examine only one agent at a time. This paper explores the issue of selectivity in VPT when different people are available to interact with. We consider the hypothesis that humanisation impacts on VPT in four studies using virtual reality method...
Article
Full-text available
During our daily lives, we often learn about the similarity of the traits and preferences of others to our own and use that information during our social interactions. However, it is unclear how the brain represents similarity between the self and others. One possible mechanism is to track similarity to oneself regardless of the identity of the oth...
Article
Full-text available
Reputation management theory suggests that our behaviour changes in the presence of others to signal good reputation (audience effect). However, the specific cognitive mechanisms by which being watched triggers these changes are poorly understood. Here we test the hypothesis that these changes happen because the belief in being watched increases se...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding other people have beliefs different from ours or different from reality is critical to social interaction. Previous studies suggest that healthy adults possess an implicit mentalising system, but alternative explanations for data from reaction time false belief tasks have also been given. In this study, we combined signal detection th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Reputation management theory suggests that our behaviour changes in the presence of others to signal good reputation (audience effect). However, the specific cognitive mechanisms by which being watched triggers these changes are poorly understood. Here we test the hypothesis that these changes happen because the belief in being watched increases se...
Preprint
Full-text available
23 The sense of self lies at the heart of conscious experience, anchoring our disparate 24 perceptions, emotions, thoughts and actions into a unitary whole. There is a growing 25 consensus that sensory information about the body plays a central role in structuring this 26 basic sense of self. Depersonalisation (DP) is an intriguing form of altered...
Preprint
Full-text available
The sense of self lies at the heart of conscious experience, anchoring our disparate perceptions, emotions, thoughts and actions into a unitary whole. There is a growing consensus that sensory information about the body plays a central role in structuring this basic sense of self. Depersonalisation (DP) is an intriguing form of altered subjective e...
Poster
Full-text available
Using Virtual Reality (VR) in a social interaction experiment. The participant, represented as a virtual human, took part in information sharing and discussion activities with a programmed female virtual character called Anna. We aim at investigating how nonverbal cues in a conversational context influences social closeness between the participants...
Article
Humans frequently imitate each other's actions with high fidelity, and different reasons have been proposed for why they do so. Here we test the hypothesis that imitation can act as a social signal, with imitation occurring with greater fidelity when a participant is being watched. In a preregistered study, 30 pairs of naïve participants played an...
Article
Full-text available
How and when a concept of the 'self' emerges has been the topic of much interest in developmental psychology. Self-awareness has been proposed to emerge at around 18 months, when toddlers start to show evidence of physical self-recognition. However, to what extent physical self-recognition is a valid indicator of being able to think about oneself,...
Article
Full-text available
This study tested whether overimitation is subject to an audience effect, and whether it is modulated by object novelty. A sample of 86 4- to 11-year-old children watched a demonstrator open novel and familiar boxes using sequences of necessary and unnecessary actions. The experimenter then observed the children, turned away, or left the room while...
Article
Full-text available
When someone is watching you, you may change your behaviour in various ways: this is called the ‘audience effect’. Social behaviours such as acting prosocially or changing gaze patterns may be used as signals of reputation and thus may be particularly prone to audience effects. The present paper aims to test the relationship between prosocial choic...
Article
Full-text available
Social interactions involve complex exchanges of a variety of social signals, such as gaze, facial expressions, speech and gestures. Focusing on the dual function of eye gaze, this review explores how the presence of an audience, communicative purpose and temporal dynamics of gaze allow interacting partners to achieve successful communication. Firs...
Preprint
Full-text available
During our daily lives, we often learn about the similarity of the traits and preferences of others to our own and use that information during our social interactions. However, it is unclear how the brain represents similarity between the self and others. One possible mechanism is to track similarity to oneself regardless of the identity of the oth...
Article
Full-text available
Mimicry, the spontaneous copying of others' behaviors, plays an important role in social affiliation, with adults selectively mimicking in-group members over out-group members. Despite infants' early documented sensitivity to cues to group membership, previous work suggests that it is not until 4 years of age that spontaneous mimicry is modulated b...
Article
Full-text available
Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) research articles show a large heterogeneity in the analysis approaches and pre-processing procedures. Additionally, there is often a lack of a complete description of the methods applied, necessary for study replication or for results comparison. The aims of this paper were (i) to review and investigat...
Article
Full-text available
Autistic people process gaze differently than typical people, but it is not yet clear if these differences lie in the processing of eye-shapes or the belief in whether others can see (perceptual mentalizing). We aimed to investigate whether these two models of gaze processing modulate social seeking in typical and autistic adults. We measured prefe...
Article
Full-text available
Whether pointing at a menu item or rifling through a clothes rack, when we choose we often move. We investigated whether people's tendency to copy the movements of others could influence their choices. Participants saw pairs of pictures in private and indicated which one they preferred. They then entered a virtual art gallery and saw the same pictu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We introduce a method of using wrist-worn accelerometers to measure non-verbal social coordination within a group that includes autistic children. Our goal was to record and chart the children's social engagement - measured using interpersonal movement synchrony - as they took part in a theatrical workshop that was specifically designed to enhance...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper introduces the idea of using wearable, multi-modal body and brain sensing, in a theatrical setting, for neuroscientific research. Wearable motion capture suits are used to track the body movements of two actors while they enact a sequence of scenes together. One actor additionally wears a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-bas...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Looking is a two-way process: we use our eyes to perceive the world around us, but we also use our eyes to signal to others. Eye contact in particular reveals much about our social interactions, and as such can be a rich source of information for context-aware wearable applications. But when designing these applications, it is useful to understand...
Article
Full-text available
Humans often learn new things via imitation. Here we draw on studies of imitation in children to characterise the brain system(s) involved in the imitation of different sequence types using functional magnetic resonance imaging. On each trial, healthy adult participants learned one of two rule types governing the sequencing of three pictures: a mot...
Data
Appendix S1. Summary of current VR display systems. Appendix S2. Listing of some current mocap technologies. Appendix S3. Listing of some current software providers and resources.
Article
Full-text available
The past few decades have seen a rapid increase in the use of functional near‐infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in cognitive neuroscience. This fast growth is due to the several advances that fNIRS offers over the other neuroimaging modalities such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography. In particular...
Article
Full-text available
The development of novel miniaturized wireless and wearable functional near‐infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) devices has paved the way for new functional brain imaging that could revolutionize the cognitive research fields. Over the past few decades, several studies have been conducted with conventional fNIRS systems that have demonstrated the suitabi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Conversation between two people involves subtle non-verbal coordination but the parameters and timing of this coordination remain unclear, which limits our models of social coordination mechanisms. We implemented high-resolution motion capture of human head motion during structured conversations. Using pre-registered analyses, we quantify cross-par...