Antonella Petruzzella

Antonella Petruzzella
Rhodes University | RU · Department of Zoology and Entomology

Dr.

About

18
Publications
2,510
Reads
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112
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
108 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202205101520253035
Introduction
Currently, I'm a Postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Biological Control (CBC) at Rhodes University, South Africa. In love with life, science and aquatic macrophytes !!!! Check my personal website for more info: www.antonellapetruzzella.com
Additional affiliations
March 2013 - February 2015
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Invasions of tropical and subtropical aquatic plants threaten biodiversity and cause ecological and economic impacts worldwide. An urgent question is whether native herbivores are able to inhibit the spread of these alien species thus providing biotic resistance. The potential for biotic resistance to these plants depends on plant traits that affec...
Article
Full-text available
AIM: Coastal wetlands are potential zones for methane (CH4) production. The present study aims to evaluate the spatial variation of CH4 production and concentration in ten tropical coastal lagoons, the influence of aquatic macrophytes on the sediment CH4 concentration and how the magnitude of these potential CH4 production rates compare to those in...
Article
Full-text available
AIM: Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important atmospheric trace gas that is involved in both the biological carbon cycle and global warming. Inland waters - mainly lakes - contribute to C cycling and have been considered a large source of atmospheric CO2. However, scientific studies usually neglect lake morphometry and the presence of aquatic macrophyt...
Article
Full-text available
Biotic resistance mediated by native plant diversity has long been hypothesized to reduce the success of invading plant species in terrestrial systems in temperate regions. However, still little is known about the mechanisms driving invasion patterns in other biomes or latitudes. We help to fill this gap by investigating how native plant community...
Article
Full-text available
1‐ Biotic resistance to alien plant invasions is mainly determined by ecological interactions in two layers of the food web: competition with native plant species, and herbivory by native herbivores. While the direct effect of native plants on alien plant performance via competition has been well documented across ecosystems, less is known about th...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming is expected to strengthen herbivore-plant interactions leading to enhanced top-down control of plants. However, latitudinal gradients in plant quality as food for herbivores suggest lower palatability at higher temperatures, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. If plant palatability would decline with temperature rise, th...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive plant species are among the major threats to freshwater biodiversity. Few experimental studies have investigated whether native plant diversity can provide biotic resistance to invaders in freshwater ecosystems. At small spatial scales, invasion resistance may increase with plant species richness due to a better use of available resources,...
Article
Full-text available
Wetlands are the largest natural methane (CH 4) source and the vegetated littoral areas are the major contributors for CH 4 release from sediment to the atmosphere. Although the effects of herbivores on biomass removal, growth and reproduction of emergent macrophytes have been well documented, their effect on plant-mediated CH 4 fluxes, especially...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Wetlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Emergent aquatic macrophytes are the greatest contributors of CH4 flux, acting as a conduit between sediment and atmosphere. Recent studies have shown that CH4 emissions can be enhanced if plants culms are damaged or clipped. In tropical costal lagoo...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Biological invasions are recognized as one of the main causes of biodiversity loss. Exotic species alter ecosystem structure and function and cause annual losses of billions of dollars worldwide. Freshwater aquatic environments, in particular, harbour a large amount of invasive species, especially aquatic macrophytes. Submerged macrophytes play a major role in structuring and functioning of tropical and temperate freshwater ecosystems. However, several species have a variety of traits which make them potential aquatic weeds. The question remains, why doesn’t all introduced species become successful in their new range? The failure of some exotic species is often explained by biotic resistance, which is the role of species interactions in limiting the success of introduced species. The strength of biotic resistance in freshwater environments is mainly determined by ecological interactions in two layers of the food web, competition by native vegetation and consumption by native herbivores (herbivory). Some studies suggest that biotic resistance reduces invasion but the results are inconsistent. In this context, a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the success of species invasion is needed. Six experiments will be performed, where we will assess the role of density and richness of species of native communities, and the role of competition and herbivory, mainly, the interaction between these two factors, which are often studied separately, in tropical and temperate freshwater systems. Thus, the main aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of these factors in the establishment and performance of the invasive species.
Project
Global climate warming has threatened our ecosystems, but few studies have focused on macrophyte-herbivore interactions in the aquatic ecosystems. By temperature control experiment, we want to explore have warming impacts on the macrophyte-herbivore interactions.