Antoine Stier

Antoine Stier
Université Lyon 1 / University of Turku

PhD

About

71
Publications
31,328
Reads
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1,791
Citations
Citations since 2016
52 Research Items
1623 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300
Introduction
My research is at the crossroad between physiology, ecology and gerontology. I am broadly interested in the physiological mechanisms contributing to the ageing process and their implication in shaping organism’s phenotype from the conception to the death. Specifically, my research is focused in establishing the role of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and telomere dynamics as proximate mechanisms shaping animal life histories.
Additional affiliations
February 2018 - February 2021
University of Turku
Position
  • Fellow
February 2016 - January 2018
University of Glasgow
Position
  • Fellow
September 2015 - January 2016
University of Glasgow
Position
  • Research Affiliate
Education
September 2005 - June 2010

Publications

Publications (71)
Article
Full-text available
Background In contrast to mammalian erythrocytes, which have lost their nucleus and mitochondria during maturation, the erythrocytes of almost all other vertebrate species are nucleated throughout their lifespan. Little research has been done however to test for the presence and functionality of mitochondria in these cells, especially for birds. He...
Article
Full-text available
Ageing is characterized by a progressive deterioration of multiple physiological and molecular pathways, which impair organismal performance and increase risks of death with advancing age. Hence, ageing studies must identify physiological and molecular pathways that show signs of age-related deterioration, and test their association with the risk o...
Article
Full-text available
1.Mitochondria are the powerhouse of animal cells. They produce through oxidative phosphorylation more than 90% of the cellular energy (ATP) required for organism's growth, reproduction and maintenance. Hence, information on mitochondrial function is expected to bring important insights in animal ecology and evolution. Unfortunately, the invasivene...
Article
Full-text available
The length of telomeres, the protective caps of chromosomes, is increasingly used as a biomarker of individual health state since it has been shown to predict chances of survival in a range of endothermic species including humans. Oxidative stress is presumed to be a major cause of telomere shortening, but most evidence to date comes from in vitro...
Article
Most of the energy fluxes supporting animal performance flow through mitochondria. Hence, inter-individual differences in performance might be rooted in inter-individual variations in mitochondrial function and density. Furthermore, because the energy required by an individual often changes across life stages, mitochondrial function and density are...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background The gut microbiome forms at an early stage, yet data on the environmental factors influencing the development of wild avian microbiomes is limited. The early studies with wild gut microbiome have shown that the rearing environment may be of importance in gut microbiome formation, yet the results vary across taxa, and the effects of speci...
Article
Maternal hormones, such as thyroid hormones (THs) transferred to embryos and eggs, are key signaling pathways for mediating maternal effects. To be able to respond to maternal cues, embryos must express the key molecular "machinery" of hormone pathways, such as enzymes and receptors. While altricial birds begin TH production only at or after hatchi...
Article
Full-text available
Developmental plasticity is partly mediated by transgenerational effects, including those mediated by the maternal endocrine system. Glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones may play central roles in developmental programming through their action on metabolism and growth. However, the mechanisms by which they affect growth and development remain underst...
Article
It is increasingly being postulated that among-individual variation in mitochondrial function underlies variation in individual performance (e.g. growth rate) and state of health. It has been suggested (but not adequately tested) that environmental conditions experienced before birth could programme postnatal mitochondrial function, with persistent...
Article
Full-text available
Hormonal pathways have been proposed to be key at modulating how fast individuals grow and reproduce and how long they live (i.e., life history trajectory). Research in model species living under controlled environment is suggesting that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), which is an evolutionarily conserved polypeptide hormone, has an important...
Preprint
Full-text available
Early-life environment is known to affect later-life health and disease, which could be mediated by the early-life programming of telomere length, a key hallmark of ageing. According to the fetal programming of telomere biology hypothesis, variation in prenatal exposure to hormones is likely to influence telomere length. Yet the contribution of key...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is increasing both the average ambient temperature and the frequency and severity of heat waves. While direct mortality induced by heat waves is increasingly reported, sub-lethal effects are also likely to impact wild populations. We hypothesized that accelerated ageing could be a cost of being exposed to higher ambient temperature,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maternal hormones, such as thyroid hormones transferred to embryos and eggs, are key signalling pathways to mediate maternal effects. To be able to respond to maternal cues, embryos must express key molecular "machinery" of the hormone pathways, such as enzymes and receptors. While altricial birds begin thyroid hormone (TH) production only at/after...
Article
Full-text available
Telomere length and shortening rate are increasingly used as biomarkers for long-term costs in ecological and evolutionary studies because of their relationships with survival and fitness. Both early-life conditions and growth, and later-life stressors can create variation in telomere shortening rate. Studies on between-population telomere length a...
Preprint
Full-text available
It is increasingly being postulated that among-individual variation in mitochondrial function underlies variation in individual performance (e.g. growth rate) and state of health. Environmental conditions experienced before birth have been suggested to programme postnatal mitochondrial biology, but the hypothesis that early-life conditions induce c...
Article
Full-text available
Telomere length is increasingly used as a biomarker of long‐term somatic state and future survival prospects. While most studies have overlooked this aspect, biological interpretations based on a given telomere length will benefit from considering the level of within‐individual repeatability of telomere length through time. Therefore, we conducted...
Article
Full-text available
Human-induced climate change is increasing the frequency, duration, and intensity of heat waves and exposure to these extreme temperatures impacts individual physiology and performance (e.g., metabolism, water balance, and growth). These traits may be susceptible to thermal conditions experienced during embryonic development, but experiments focusi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Telomere length and shortening rate are increasingly used as biomarkers for long-term costs in ecological and evolutionary studies because of their relationships with survival and fitness. Telomere length can be heritable, but both early-life conditions and later-life stressors can create variation in telomere shortening rate. Studies on between-po...
Article
Dache et al. (2020, FASEB J. 15, e2002338-15) recently reported the presence of respiratory-competent cell-free mitochondria in human blood (up to 3.7 x 10 ⁶ per mL of blood), providing exciting perspectives on the potential role of these extra-cellular mitochondria. While their evidence for the presence of cell-free mitochondria in human blood is...
Preprint
Full-text available
Telomere length is increasingly used as a biomarker of long-term life history costs, ageing and future survival prospects. Yet, to have the potential to predict long-term outcomes, telomere length should exhibit a relatively high within-individual repeatability over time, which has been largely overlooked in past studies. To fill this gap, we condu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Dache et al. (2020, FASEB J. 15, e2002338–15) recently reported the presence of respiratory-competent cell-free mitochondria in human blood (up to 3.7 x 106 per mL of blood), providing exciting perspectives on the potential role of these extra-cellular mitochondria. While their evidence for the presence of cell-free mitochondria in human blood is c...
Article
Biologists have long appreciated the critical role energy turnover plays in understanding variation in performance and fitness among individuals. Whole-organism metabolic studies have provided key insights into fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes. However, constraints operating at subcellular levels—such as those operating within the...
Article
Full-text available
2,4-Dinitrophenol (DNP), a molecule uncoupling mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation from oxygen consumption, is illegally used by humans as a diet pill, but is nonetheless investigated as a potential human medicine against ‘metabesity’. Due to its proven acute toxicity and the scarceness of long-term studies on DNP administration in vertebrates,...
Article
Early-life conditions are crucial determinants of phenotype and fitness. The effects of pre- and postnatal conditions on fitness prospects have been widely studied but their interactive effects have received less attention. In birds, asynchronous hatching creates challenging developmental conditions for the last-hatched chicks, but differential all...
Article
Full-text available
The underlying mechanisms of the lifelong consequences of prenatal environmental condition on health and ageing remain little understood. Thyroid hormones (THs) are important regulators of embryogenesis, transferred from the mother to the embryo. Since prenatal THs can accelerate early-life development, we hypothesized that this might occur at the...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal effects via hormonal transfer from the mother to the offspring provide a tool to translate environmental cues to the offspring. Experimental manipulations of maternally transferred hormones have yielded increasingly contradictory results, which may be explained by differential effects of hormones under different environmental contexts. Yet...
Article
Prenatal effects on telomere length are increasingly recognized as a potential contributor to the developmental origin of health and adult disease. While it is becoming clear that telomere length is influenced by prenatal conditions, the factors affecting telomere dynamics during embryogenesis remain poorly understood. We manipulated both the pace...
Article
Telomeres are DNA structures that protect chromosome ends. However, telomeres shorten during cell replication and at critically low lengths can reduce cell replicative potential, induce cell senescence and decrease fitness. Stress exposure, which elevates glucocorticoid hormone concentrations, can exacerbate telomere attrition. This phenomenon has...
Preprint
Full-text available
Prenatal environmental conditions can have lifelong consequences on health and aging. The underlying mechanisms remain nonetheless little understood. Thyroid hormones (THs) are important regulators of embryogenesis transferred from the mother to the embryo. In an avian model, we manipulated embryo exposure to maternal THs through egg injection and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maternal effects via hormonal transfer from the mother to the offspring provide a tool to translate environmental cues to the offspring. Experimental manipulations of maternally transferred hormones have yielded increasingly contradictory results, which may be explained by environment-dependent effects of hormones. Yet context-dependent effects hav...
Article
Full-text available
Because telomere length and dynamics relate to individual growth, reproductive investment and survival, telomeres have emerged as possible markers of individual quality. Here, we tested the hypothesis that, in species with parental care, parental telomere length can be a marker of parental quality that predicts offspring phenotype and survival. In...
Article
Full-text available
The length of telomeres (i.e. the protective non-coding DNA repeat sequences capping the end of eukaryotic chromosomes) is drawing an increasing attention in ecology and evolution as a biomarker of individual state and fate. Bird erythrocytes are nucleated and telomere measurements using blood derived DNA has become the gold standard in avian biolo...
Article
Full-text available
In addition to direct mortality, predators can have indirect effects on prey populations by affecting prey behaviour or physiology. For example, predator presence can increase stress hormone levels, which can have physiological costs. Stress exposure accelerates the shortening of telomeres (i.e. the protective caps of chromosomes) and shorter telom...
Article
Full-text available
Acute rises in glucocorticoid hormones allow individuals to adaptively respond to environmental challenges but may also have negative consequences , including oxidative stress. While the effects of chronic glucocorticoid exposure on oxidative stress have been well characterized, those of acute stress or glucocorticoid exposure have mostly been over...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pre-natal effects on telomere length are increasingly recognized as a potential contributor to the developmental origin of health and adult diseases. While it is becoming clear that telomere length is strongly influenced by pre-natal conditions, the factors affecting telomere dynamics during embryogenesis remain poorly understood. We manipulated bo...
Thesis
Full-text available
The transfer of maternal hormones is a key mediator of maternal effects, transmitting context-dependent information from the mother to the offspring. Thyroid hormones (TH) have important roles in shaping metabolism, thermogenesis and coordinating embryonic development, but their role in the context of maternal hormonal effects have been relatively...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mitochondrial respiratory states and rates MitoEAGLE Task Group
Preprint
Full-text available
Most of the energy fluxes supporting animal performance flow through mitochondria. Hence, inter-individual differences in performance might be rooted in inter-individual variations in mitochondrial function and density. Furthermore, because the energy required by an individual often changes across life stages, mitochondrial function and density are...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to unpredictable environmental stressors could influence animal health and fitness by inducing oxidative stress, potentially through downstream effects of glucocorticoid stress hormones (e.g. corticosterone) on mitochondrial function. Yet, it remains unclear whether species that have evolved in stochastic and challenging environments may p...
Preprint
Full-text available
In view of the broad implications for health care, mitochondrial researchers face an 121 increasing responsibility to disseminate their fundamental knowledge and novel discoveries to 122 a wide range of stakeholders and scientists beyond the group of specialists. This requires 123 implementation of a commonly accepted terminology within the discipl...
Article
A large number of studies have focused on the reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the consequences of glucocorticoids (GC) in mediating life-history trade-offs. Although short-term increases in GCs are viewed as adaptive, mobilizing energy substrates allowing animals to deal with impending threats (e.g. stimulating hepat...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the links between environmental conditions and longevity remains a major focus in biological research. We examined within-individual changes between early- and mid-adulthood in the circulating levels of four oxidative stress markers linked to ageing, using zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata): a DNA damage product (8-hydroxy-2’-deoxygu...
Article
Full-text available
The physiological mechanisms underlying the ‘cost of reproduction’ remain under debate, though oxidative stress has emerged as a potential candidate. The ‘oxidative cost of reproduction’ has received considerable attention with regards to food and antioxidant availability, however the limitation of water availability has thus far been neglected. In...
Article
Full-text available
In response to prolonged periods of fasting, animals have evolved metabolic adaptations helping to mobilize body reserves and/or reducing metabolic rate, to ensure a longer usage of reserves. Those metabolic changes can however be associated with higher exposure to oxidative stress, raising the question how species that naturally fast during their...
Article
Full-text available
Dynamic ornamental signals that vary over minutes, hours or weeks can yield continuous information on individual condition (e.g., energy reserves or immune status), and may therefore be under strong social and/or sexual selection. In vertebrates, the coloration of the integument is often viewed as a dynamic ornament, which in birds can be apparent...
Article
Full-text available
Telomeres shorten at each cell division due to the “end-replication problem”, but also in response to oxidative stress. Consequently telomeres shorten with age in many endotherms, and this shortening is accelerated under stressful environmental conditions. Data in ectotherm vertebrates remain scarce so far, so our goal was to review existing data f...
Article
Full-text available
Telomeres are specialized non-coding DNA sequences that cap the end of chromosomes and protect genome integrity. Because telomeres shorten during development and their length at maturity is often associated with survival, one hypothesis is that telomere erosion during early growth is closely associated with life history trajectories of individuals...
Article
Full-text available
Mate choice is expected to be important for the fitness of both sexes for species in which successful reproduction relies strongly on shared and substantial parental investment by males and females. Reciprocal selection may then favour the evolution of morphological signals providing mutual information on the condition/quality of tentative partners...
Article
Full-text available
Life-history theory concerns the trade-offs that mold the patterns of investment by animals between reproduction, growth, and survival. It is widely recognized that physiology plays a role in the mediation of life-history trade-offs, but the details remain obscure. As life-history theory concerns aspects of investment in the soma that influence sur...
Article
Full-text available
A trade-off between resource investment toward growth rate and body self-maintenance is likely to occur, but the underlying molecular mediators of such trade-off remain to be determined. In many altricial birds, hatching asynchrony creates a sibling competitive hierarchy within the brood, with first-hatched nestlings enjoying substantial advantages...
Article
Full-text available
Endotherms have evolved two major types of thermogenesis that allow them to actively produce heat in response to cold exposure, either through muscular activity (i.e. shivering thermogenesis) or through futile electro-chemical cycles (i.e. non-shivering thermogenesis). Amongst the latter, mitochondrial uncoupling is of key importance because it is...
Article
Full-text available
Mitochondria have a fundamental role in the transduction of energy from food into ATP. The coupling between food oxidation and ATP production is however never perfect but may nevertheless be of evolutionary significance. The 'uncoupling to survive' hypothesis suggests that 'mild' mitochondrial uncoupling evolved as a protective mechanism against th...
Article
Full-text available
Background Life history theories predict that investment in current reproduction comes at a cost for future reproduction and survival. Oxidative stress is one of the best documented mechanisms underlying costs of reproduction to date. However, other, yet to be described molecular mechanisms that play a short term role during reproduction may expla...
Article
Full-text available
The short favorable period of time available for the growth in seasonal environments could constrain the resources allocation between growth and other life-history traits, and the short-term fitness benefits of increased growth rate may prevail over other functions. Accelerated growth rates have been associated with long-term deleterious consequenc...