Antoine E. Simond

Antoine E. Simond
Simon Fraser University · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

13
Publications
2,337
Reads
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77
Citations
Citations since 2017
9 Research Items
77 Citations
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Introduction
Antoine E. Simond currently works for Tanya Brown (PhD, Fisheries and Oceans Canada), where he is studying the impact of organic contaminants in beluga whales and seals, using molecular and Omics tools.
Additional affiliations
November 2021 - present
Simon Fraser University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • I am currently working for DFO Canada in Tanya Brown's laboratory. I am involved in several projects around the use of Omics technologies applied to Canadian marine mammal populations. The overall goal is to study their metabolic processes and better understand the changes that occur when they are facing stresses such as ecological-changes related to climate change and/or exposure to contaminants.
January 2016 - March 2020
Université du Québec à Montréal
Position
  • Student member of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee
Description
  • My role is to participate in the evaluation and the validation of research protocols linked with the use of laboratory of wild animals.
Education
January 2015 - August 2020
September 2011 - September 2013
Université du Havre
Field of study
  • Marine ecotoxicology

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Very high levels of industrial contaminants in St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE) beluga whales represent one of the major threats to this population classified as endangered under the Species at Risk Act in Canada. Elevated concentrations of short-chained chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) were recently reported in blubber of adult male SLE belugas. Recent reg...
Article
Full-text available
As a high trophic-level species, ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) are particularly vulnerable to elevated concentrations of biomagnifying contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and mercury (Hg). These species also face climate-change-related impacts which a...
Article
The endangered beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) population residing in the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE; Eastern Canada) is declining. The elevated tissue concentrations of a wide range of organohalogen contaminants might play a role in the non-recovery of this whale population. Organohalogens have been reported to impair the regulation of several metab...
Article
Elevated concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and emerging halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) have been reported in tissues of the endangered St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada) beluga population as well as in minke whales visiting that same feeding area. This study examined the linkages between blubber concentrations of POPs and emerg...
Poster
Full-text available
Les organismes vivant dans le fleuve et l’estuaire du Saint-Laurent sont exposés aux rejets urbains et agricoles des grands bassins versants situés en amont de ces écosystèmes. Une étude récente de notre laboratoire a démontré que plusieurs retardateurs de flamme halogénés (c.à.d., PBDE et composés émergents) sont détectés dans le gras de bélugas d...
Article
An exponential level increase of the ubiquitous halogenated flame retardant (HFR) class polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) has been documented during the 1990s in endangered belugas (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE), Eastern Canada. The recent worldwide bans and regulations of PBDE mixtures led to their replacement by al...
Poster
Full-text available
Situé en aval de plusieurs grandes villes, l’estuaire du Saint-Laurent reçoit d’importantes quantités de retardateurs de flamme halogénés (RFH). Le béluga, espèce résidente de l’estuaire, ainsi que plusieurs espèces de baleines qui viennent s’y alimenter chaque été, sont exposés à ces contaminants. Notre objectif était d’étudier les tendances tempo...
Poster
Full-text available
Located downstream of a number of large cities, the St. Lawrence Estuary (Eastern Canada) has over the years become a highly contaminated area by halogenated flame retardants (HFRs). Each summer, several whale species migrate into the St. Lawrence Estuary for feeding. Due to their high trophic level, certain tooth and baleen whales are highly expos...
Poster
Full-text available
Le fleuve Saint-Laurent est un écosystème unique reconnu mondialement pour sa diversification et sa grande richesse biologique. Depuis plusieurs décennies, cette diversité est menacée à cause d’un fort développement industriel et démographique, provoquant le déversement d’énormes quantités de produits chimiques. Chaque année, de nombreux mammifères...
Thesis
Full-text available
De 2001 à 2005, de nombreux cas d'intoxications semblables à la ciguatéra ont été rapportés dans une tribu de Lifou (Province des Iles Loyautés, Nouvelle-Calédonie). La consommation de bénitiers (Tridacna spp.) ou de poissons en était la cause. Une inefficacité apparente des remèdes traditionnels a été constatée. De ce fait, à partir de 2005, un su...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Goal of my question
I already have an idea of the answer, BUT what I am looking for here is points of view and solid arguments from different people .
Context
I am studying interactions between concentrations of organic contaminants quantified in whale blubber and gene transcript levels measured in skin. Samples are obtained from fresh biopsies of skin and blubber.
I have been told by my director that in toxicological studies, it is better to use concentrations in wet weight, as it is more representative. One of the main reason is that converting my concentrations in lipid weight would extrapolate concentrations and probably distort my results. Indeed, lipid percentages of tissues were different between my samples, and relatively low (between 7 and 24%).
Do you have other solid arguments explaining why I should use wet weight concentrations? Paper to cite in order to support my point?
Question
I already know that blubber is the best tissue to analyze to invastigate on these pollutants. 
I was unable to find papers showing results of contaminants in cetacean skin.
The goal of my question is to know if it is relevant to explore that tissue and see if there are some issues in analyzing hydrophobic contaminants in cetacean skin.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
1- Study profiles and concentrations of several metabolites (amino acids, biogenic amines, fatty acids and energetic metabolites) present in skin of belugas 2- Investigate associations between metabolite profiles and several concentrations of contaminants (PCBs, p,p'-DDE, HCB, trans-nonachlor, PBDEs, HBB, PBEB, DP, Cplus, and SCCPs) found in blubber of St. Lawrence Estuary belugas.
Archived project
- Analyze genes involved in steroidogenesis in skin biopsies of St. Lawrence (Canada) beluga and Minke whales. - Analyze flame retardants in the blubber of these two populations.