Antimo Buonocore

Antimo Buonocore
Suor Orsola Benincasa University of Naples

PhD Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

About

49
Publications
3,477
Reads
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542
Citations
Introduction
My main research focus is visual neuroscience. Specifically, I am addressing questions about response inhibition and decision processes within the saccadic system.
Additional affiliations
April 2012 - December 2015
Università degli Studi di Trento
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2006 - November 2010
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2005 - September 2006
Università di Parma
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
November 2006 - November 2010
The University of Edinburgh
Field of study
  • Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

Publications

Publications (49)
Preprint
Visual neural processing is distributed among a multitude of sensory and sensory-motor brain areas exhibiting varying degrees of functional specializations and spatial representational anisotropies. Such diversity raises the question of how perceptual performance is determined, at any one moment in time, during natural active visual behavior. Here,...
Article
Full-text available
Visual transients can interrupt overt orienting by abolishing the execution of a planned eye movement due about 90 ms later, a phenomenon known as saccadic inhibition (SI). It is not known if the same inhibitory process might influence covert orienting in the absence of saccades, and consequently alter visual perception. In Experiment 1 ( n = 14),...
Article
Full-text available
A key feature of visual processing in humans is the use of saccadic eye movements to look around the environment. Saccades are typically used to bring relevant information, which is glimpsed with extrafoveal vision, into the high-resolution fovea for further processing. With the exception of some unusual circumstances, such as the first fixation wh...
Article
Full-text available
At any moment in time, new information is sampled from the environment and interacts with ongoing brain state. Often, such interaction takes place within individual circuits that are capable of both mediating the internally ongoing plan as well as representing exogenous sensory events. Here we investigated how sensory-driven neural activity can be...
Article
Full-text available
Visual selection in primates is intricately linked to eye movements, which are generated by a network of cortical and subcortical neural circuits. When visual selection is performed covertly, without foveating eye movements towards the selected targets, a class of fixational eye movements, called microsaccades, is still involved. Microsaccades are...
Article
Microsaccades have a steady rate of occurrence during maintained gaze fixation, which gets transiently modulated by abrupt sensory stimuli. Such modulation, characterized by a rapid reduction in microsaccade frequency followed by a stronger rebound phase of high microsaccade rate, is often described as the microsaccadic rate signature, owing to its...
Article
Covert and overt spatial selection behaviors are guided by both visual saliency maps derived from early visual features as well as priority maps reflecting high-level cognitive factors. However, whether mid-level perceptual processes associated with visual form recognition contribute to covert and overt spatial selection behaviors remains unclear....
Article
Full-text available
The eyes are never still during maintained gaze fixation. When microsaccades are not occurring, ocular position exhibits continuous slow changes, often referred to as drifts. Unlike microsaccades, drifts remain to be viewed as largely random eye movements. Here we found that ocular position drifts can, instead, be very systematically stimulus-drive...
Article
Full-text available
The eyes are never still during maintained gaze fixation. When microsaccades are not occurring, ocular position exhibits continuous slow changes, often referred to as drifts. Unlike microsaccades, drifts remain to be viewed as largely random eye movements. Here we found that ocular position drifts can, instead, be very systematically stimulus-drive...
Article
Full-text available
The eyes are never still during maintained gaze fixation. When microsaccades are not occurring, ocular position exhibits continuous slow changes, often referred to as drifts. Unlike microsaccades, drifts remain to be viewed as largely random eye movements. Here we found that ocular position drifts can, instead, be very systematically stimulus-drive...
Preprint
Full-text available
It is well known that visual transients can abolish the execution of an eye movement about 90 ms later, a phenomenon known as saccadic inhibition (SI). But it is not known if the same inhibitory process might influence covert orienting in the absence of saccades, and consequently alter visual perception. We measured orientation discrimination perfo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Covert and overt spatial selection behaviors are guided by both visual saliency maps derived from early visual features as well as priority maps reflecting high-level cognitive factors. However, whether mid-level perceptual processes associated with visual form recognition contribute to covert and overt spatial selection behaviors remains unclear....
Preprint
Full-text available
At any moment in time, new information is sampled from the environment and interacts with ongoing brain state. Often, such interaction takes place within individual circuits that are capable of both mediating the internally ongoing plan as well as representing exogenous sensory events. Here we investigated how sensory-driven neural activity can be...
Preprint
Full-text available
Microsaccades have a steady rate of occurrence during maintained gaze fixation, which gets transiently modulated by abrupt sensory stimuli. Such modulation, characterized by a rapid reduction in microsaccade frequency followed by a stronger rebound phase of high microsaccade rate, is often described as the microsaccadic rate signature, owing to its...
Preprint
Full-text available
Eye position changes subtly even when perfect gaze fixation is attempted. Such 'fixational' eye movement comes in two primary flavors: microsaccades, which resemble large saccades and rapidly shift gaze position by a minute amount; and ocular position drifts, which are even smaller and slower movements. The mechanisms for generating and influencing...
Article
Humans actively sample their environment with saccadic eye movements to bring relevant information into high-acuity foveal vision. Despite being lower in resolution, peripheral information is also available before each saccade. How the pre-saccadic extrafoveal preview of a visual object influences its post-saccadic processing is still an unanswered...
Article
Full-text available
Despite strong evidence to the contrary in the literature, microsaccades are overwhelmingly described as involuntary eye movements. Here we show in both human subjects and monkeys that individual microsaccades of any direction can easily be triggered: (1) on demand, based on an arbitrary instruction, (2) without any special training, (3) without vi...
Article
The world appears stable despite saccadic eye-movements. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that the visual system predicts upcoming input across saccadic eye-movements based on peripheral preview of the saccadic target. We tested this idea using concurrent electroencephalography (EEG) and eye-tracking. Participants made cued saccades...
Preprint
Full-text available
Humans actively sample their environment with saccadic eye movements to bring relevant information into high-acuity foveal vision. Despite being lower in resolution, peripheral information is also available prior to each saccade. How pre-saccadic extrafoveal preview of a visual object influences its post-saccadic processing is still an unanswered q...
Preprint
Full-text available
Microsaccades are overwhelmingly described as involuntary eye movements. Here we show in both human subjects and monkeys that individual microsaccades of any direction can easily be triggered: (1) 'on demand', based on an arbitrary instruction, (2) without any special training, (3) without visual guidance by a stimulus, and (4) in a spatially and t...
Article
Full-text available
The oculomotor system integrates a variety of visual signals into appropriate motor plans, but such integration can have widely varying time scales. For example, smooth pursuit eye movements to follow a moving target are slower and longer lasting than saccadic eye movements and it has been suggested that initiating a smooth pursuit eye movement inv...
Article
Two main types of small eye movements occur during gaze fixation: microsaccades and slow ocular drifts. While microsaccade generation has been relatively well studied, ocular drift control mechanisms are unknown. Here we explored the degree to which monkey smooth eye movements, on the velocity scale of slow ocular drifts, can be generated systemati...
Preprint
Full-text available
The world appears stable despite saccadic eye-movements. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that the visual system predicts upcoming input across saccadic eye-movements, based on peripheral preview of the saccadic target. We tested this idea using concurrent electroencephalography (EEG) and eye-tracking. Participants made cued saccades...
Preprint
Full-text available
The oculomotor system integrates a variety of visual signals into appropriate motor plans, but such integration can have widely varying time scales. For example, unlike with rapid saccades, it has been suggested that initiating a smooth pursuit eye movement to follow a moving target involves an obligatory open-loop interval, in which new visual mot...
Preprint
Full-text available
Two main types of small eye movements occur during gaze fixation: microsaccades and slow ocular drifts. While microsaccade generation has been relatively well-studied, ocular drift control mechanisms are unknown. Here we explored the degree to which monkey smooth eye movements, on the velocity scale of slow ocular drifts, can be generated systemati...
Article
Full-text available
As we look around the world, selecting for targets, competing events may occur at other locations. Depending on current goals, the viewer must decide whether to look at new events or to ignore them. Two experimental paradigms formalize these response options: double-step saccades and saccadic inhibition. In the first, the viewer must reorient to a...
Article
Full-text available
We interact with complex scenes using eye movements to select targets of interest. Studies have shown that the future target of a saccadic eye movement is processed differently by the visual system. A number of effects have been reported, including a benefit for perceptual performance at the target (“enhancement”), reduced influences of backward ma...
Article
Microsaccades occur during gaze fixation in order to correct for miniscule foveal motor errors. The mechanisms governing such fine oculomotor control are still not fully understood. In this study, we explored microsaccade control by analyzing the impacts of transient visual stimuli on these movements' kinematics. We found that such kinematics can b...
Article
Full-text available
Visual transients, such as a bright flash, reduce the proportion of saccades executed around 60-125 ms after flash onset, a phenomenon known as saccadic inhibition. Across three experiments, we apply a similar time-course analysis to the amplitudes and velocities of saccades. Alongside the expected reduction of saccade frequency in the key time per...
Article
Our perception of the surrounding environment remains stable despite the fact that we frequently change the retinal position of input by rapid gaze shifts (saccades). There is a long-standing debate whether visual stability depends on an active mechanism using an efference copy of the impending saccadic motor command. Behavioral studies showing cha...
Article
Stimuli briefly presented around the time of saccades are often misperceived in terms of their spatial or temporal attributes. Recently, evidence for a peri-saccadic reduction in crowding was reported, interpreted in terms of remapping of receptive fields (Harrison et al., 2013). However, that study used forward and backward masks and weak (always...
Article
Full-text available
When we explore the visual environment around us, we produce sequences of very precise eye movements aligning the objects of interest with the most sensitive part of the retina for detailed visual processing. A copy of the impending motor command, the corollary discharge, is sent as soon as the first saccade in a sequence is ready to monitor the ne...
Article
Saccades operate a continuous selection between competing targets at different locations. This competition has been mostly investigated in the visual context, and it is well known that a visual distractor can interfere with a saccade toward a visual target. Here, we investigated whether multimodal, audio-visual targets confer stronger resilience ag...
Article
Full-text available
Remembering the past and imagining the future both rely on complex mental imagery. We considered the possibility that constructing a future scene might tap a component of mental imagery that is not as critical for remembering past scenes. Whereas visual imagery plays an important role in remembering the past, we predicted that spatial imagery plays...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been known that eye movements are functionally involved in the generation and maintenance of mental images. Indeed, a number of studies demonstrated that voluntary eye movements interfere with mental imagery tasks (e.g., Laeng and Teodorescu in Cogn Sci 26:207-231, 2002). However, mental imagery is conceived as a multifarious cognitive...
Article
WE HAVE SUGGESTED THAT THE REMOTE DISTRACTOR EFFECT RDE, THE ELEVATION OF AVERAGE SACCADIC REACTION TIME SRT INDUCED BY A TASK-IRRELEVANT DISTRACTOR, MAY BE EXPLAINED AS A STATISTICAL CONSEQUENCE OF A CHARACTERISTIC RESHAPING OF THE SRT DISTRIBUTION KNOWN AS SACCADIC INHIBITION SI; BUONOCORE & MCINTOSH, 2008 IN A RECENT PAPER, WALKER AND BENSON 201...
Article
Full-text available
Our peripheral vision is very limited. We can perceive isolated targets in our periphery, but when multiple stimuli are presented simultaneously our perception deteriorates drastically, a phenomenon known as crowding ([Whitney and Levi, 2011][1]). Crowded stimuli can still be detected, but can no
Article
Visual transient events during ongoing eye movement tasks inhibit saccades within a precise temporal window, spanning from around 60-120 ms after the event, having maximum effect at around 90 ms. It is not yet clear to what extent this saccadic inhibition phenomenon can be modulated by attention. We studied the saccadic inhibition induced by a brig...
Article
Distractors presented contralateral to a visual target inhibit the generation of saccades within a precise temporal window (Buonocore & McIntosh, 2008; Reingold & Stampe, 2002; Walker, Kentridge, & Findlay, 1995). The greatest 'dip' of saccadic inhibition typically occurs at about 90ms after distractor onset, with a subsequent recovery period showi...
Article
Full-text available
The remote distractor effect (RDE) is a robust phenomenon whereby target-directed saccades are delayed by the appearance of a distractor. This effect persists even when the target location is perfectly predictable. The RDE has been studied extensively in the oculomotor domain but it is unknown whether it generalises to other spatially oriented resp...
Article
Whether mental visual images play a functional role in cognition or that propositional knowledge is sufficient for supporting performance in imagery tasks is a long-standing debate. It cannot be resolved using behavioural data alone, nor by brain imaging data alone; for example, across fMRI studies mental rotation has been shown to involve virtuall...
Article
Previous repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and neuroimaging studies showed that Broca's area is involved in the interaction between gestures and words. However, in these studies the nature of this interaction was not fully investigated; consequently, we addressed this issue in three behavioral experiments. When compared to the expression...
Article
Full-text available
The remote distractor effect is a robust finding whereby a saccade to a lateralised visual target is delayed by the simultaneous, or near simultaneous, onset of a distractor in the opposite hemifield. Saccadic inhibition is a more recently discovered phenomenon whereby a transient change to the scene during a visual task induces a depression in sac...
Article
Full-text available
The present study aimed to determine whether the representation of object affordances requires specification of the effector potentially interacting with the object: specifically, in this study, vision of the interacting hand. In Experiment 1 we used an apparatus by which a fruit to be reached and grasped was identified by word reading, whereas ano...