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Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson
CIBER Research

About

108
Publications
24,033
Reads
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2,012
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - present
University College London
Position
  • Honorary Lectuer

Publications

Publications (108)
Article
Full-text available
Early career researchers have both been the most directly effected by the COVID-19 pandemic and responsible for some of the most innovative responses to it. Reporting on findings from the Harbingers-2 study, Discusses how the international cohort followed by the study has adapted to an emerging ‘new scholarly normality’
Article
Presents early data from an investigation of the work lives and scholarly communication practices of 177 early career researchers (ECRs) from eight countries. Utilizing mainly coded and textual data from inter�views, the paper reports on the findings that pertain to publishing papers in peer reviewed journals. We examine which factors are taken int...
Article
Full-text available
In a blogpost from this time last year, we introduced Harbingers-2, a longitudinal qualitative research project, which seeks to understand the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the early career researcher (ECR) community. One year on, halfway into the project, it seems appropriate to revisit the oft-heard 'horror' scenario: the predi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The study presents comparative qualitative findings from a longitudinal exploration of the impact of the pandemic on early career researchers (ECRs) from the sciences and social sciences. Using qualitative methodologies, it focuses on the increasing demands of remote teaching made on ECRs and the potentially negative effects these had on their rese...
Preprint
Full-text available
The study presents comparative qualitative findings from a longitudinal exploration of the impact of the pandemic on early career researchers (ECRs) from the sciences and social sciences. Using qualitative methodologies, it focuses on the increasing demands of remote teaching made on ECRs and the potentially negative effects these had on their rese...
Article
Full-text available
The paper draws on evidence of predatory publishing obtained from the 4 year-long Harbingers research study of the changing scholarly communication attitudes and behaviour of early career researchers (ECRs). The project featured longitudinal interviews for its first 3 years with 116 ECRs researching science and social sciences who came from China,...
Article
Full-text available
In order to take account of the impact of the pandemic on the already changing scholarly communications and work-life of early career researchers (ECRs), the 4-year long Harbingers study was extended for another two years. As a precursor to the study (featuring interviews and a questionnaire survey), currently underway, an analytic review of the pe...
Article
Full-text available
Discusses the challenges facing early career researchers as a result of the pandemic and outlines how a new longitudinal, qualitative study involving 160 Early Career Researchers (ECRs) from 8 countries will seek to understand how they fare over the next two years.
Article
Full-text available
This study explores early career researchers’ (ECRs) appreciation and utilisation of open access (OA) publishing. The evidence reported here results from a questionnaire-based international survey with 1600 participants, which forms the second leg and final year of a four year long, mixed methods, longitudinal study that sought to discover whether...
Article
Full-text available
This study explores early career researchers’ (ECRs) appreciation and utilisation of open access (OA) publishing. The evidence reported here results from a questionnaire-based international survey with 1600 participants, which forms the second leg and final year of a four year long, mixed methods, longitudinal study that sought to discover whether...
Preprint
Full-text available
The paper draws on evidence of predatory publishing obtained from the 4 year-long Harbingers research study of the changing scholarly communication attitudes and behaviour of early career researchers (ECRs). The project featured longitudinal interviews for the first 3 years with 116 international ECRs researching science and social sciences who cam...
Article
Full-text available
The paper compares the scholarly communication attitudes and practices of early career researchers (ECRs) in eight countries concerning discovery, reading, publishing, authorship, open access, and social media. The data are taken from the most recent investigation in the 4-year-long Harbingers project. A survey was undertaken to establish whether t...
Article
Full-text available
The study investigates the attitudes and practices of early career researchers (ECRs) in regard to citation-based metrics and altmetrics, providing the findings in the light of what might be expected of the millennial generation and in the context of what we already know about researchers in today’s ‘culture of counting’ governed scholarly world. T...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents an up‐to‐date portrayal of the greatly changed landscape of scholarly journal publishing and identifies the emerging trends characterising it. We consider the attributes, novelty, and disruptive potential of different models, which range from improvements to the extant model to attempts at reconfiguration and transformation. W...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes an international study informed by a 3-year-long qualitative longitudinal project, which sought to discover the scholarly communication attitudes and behaviour of early career researchers (ECRs). Using a combination of small-scale interviews and a larger-scale survey, ECRs were questioned on their searching and reading behavi...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports on the findings of an international online survey of early career researchers (ECRs) with regard to their authorship and peer review, attitudes , and practices, which sought to discover how the new wave of researchers were utilizing these key aspects of the scholarly communications system. A questionnaire was developed on the b...
Article
Full-text available
A study from the Harbingers research project provides a comprehensive assessment of the main features of the scholarly communications system as viewed by early career researchers (ECRs) in the final year of the study (2018). Aspects covered are: discovery and access, authorship practices, peer review, publishing strategies, open access publishing,...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines changes in attitudes and behaviours of the new wave of researchers (early career researchers) regarding the academic library and its functions in seven countries around the world. It documents trends and establishes the direction in which things are heading. Data were collected from over 100 researchers from the sciences and soc...
Article
Full-text available
Reports on the findings on the open science attitudes and behaviours of early career researchers (ECRs) from the Harbingers research project, which sought to determine whether they are the agents of change when it comes to scholarly communications. Nearly 120 science and social science researchers from 7 countries were questioned, longitudinally ov...
Chapter
The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain - edited by Andrew Nash June 2019
Article
Full-text available
Presenting evidence from the Harbingers Study, a three-year longitudinal study of Early Career Researchers (ECRs), David Nicholas assesses the extent to which the new wave of researchers are driving changes in scholarly practices. Finding that innovative practices are often constrained by institutional structures and precarious employment, he sugge...
Article
Full-text available
Three years ago, the Publishing Research Consortium (PRC) commissioned a highly ambitious, international study, the like of which has not been seen in the scholarly communications field. More than a hundred science and social science early career researchers (ECRs) from seven countries were depth-interviewed annually for three-years (2016-2018) in...
Article
This article provides the final results of a 3‐year study that sought to discover whether early career researchers (ECRs) were the harbingers of change with respect to scholarly communications. Over a hundred science and social science ECRs from seven countries, spanning three continents, were depth‐interviewed annually for 3 years (2016–2018) abou...
Article
Full-text available
The paper presents the early findings from the first two years of the Harbingers research project , a 3-year-long study of early career researchers (ECRs), the new wave of researchers, which sought to ascertain their current and changing habits with regard to scholarly communications. The study recruited a convenience sample of 116 researchers from...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Three years ago, the Publishing Research Consortium (PRC) commissioned a highly ambitious, international study, the like of which has not been seen in the scholarly communications field. More than a hundred science and social science early career researchers (ECRs) from seven countries were depth-interviewed annually for three-years (2016-2018) in...
Technical Report
Full report at: https://www.stm-assoc.org/2018_10_04_STM_Report_2018.pdf This is the 5th edition of The STM Report - An overview of scientific and scholarly publishing covering the research lifecycle and the scholarly communication landscape.
Presentation
Full-text available
Breaking research findings from the final year of the Harbinger project
Article
Full-text available
Early-career researchers—that is, those without tenure and typically in their 20s and 30s—make up the largest group of researchers in most countries and universities. They are the fuel that powers the world’s research projects. They are tomorrow’s Nobel prizewinners. They were born digital, and bring with them the millennials’ belief in openness, s...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this article is twofold: a) to describe and compare methods of early career researcher (ECR) assessment/appraisal; b) to explain how ECRs build, showcase, and monitor their reputation in an era of novel developments in scholarly communications. In all, 116 ECRs from China, France, Malaysia, Poland, Spain, the UK, and the US were ques...
Article
Full-text available
The younger generation sees a collaborative system as key to discovery and advancement, a three-year tracking project reveals. See https://www.natureindex.com/news-blog/early-career-researchers-herald-change
Technical Report
Full-text available
Early career researchers and whether they will be the harbingers of change in respect to scholarly communication behaviour.
Article
Key points • Early career researchers (ECRs) consider journals the central form of communication – but are concerned about pressure to publish. • ECRs want to share but currently accept the closed publishing system because of the need to build a traditional reputation. • ECRs know – and appear to care – little about publishers but trust them as pu...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents research into the scholarly communication attitudes and behaviours of Chinese early-career researchers (ECRs). This research comes from year two of a projected three-year-long study of ECRs from seven countries (China, France, Malaysia, Poland, Spain, the UK, and the US), for which semi-structured in-depth interviews were conduc...
Presentation
Full-text available
Partial results of first and second year of the research project: Early Career Researchers: the Harbingers of Change? Head of project: David Nicholas, CIBER Ltd.
Presentation
Full-text available
Changing face of scholarly communication behaviour as exhibited by early career researchers. Year 2 results from a three-year longitudinal study
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents selected findings from the first year of a 3-year longitudinal study of early career researchers (ECRs), which sought to ascertain current and changing habits in scholarly communication. Specifically, the aims of the paper are to show: (1) how much experience and knowledge ECRs had of peer review – both as authors and as reviewe...
Presentation
Full-text available
Pierwsze (z zaplanowanych trzech) doniesienie z badań wśród 116 młodych (do 35 lat) naukowców z 7 krajów: Stanów Zjednoczonych, Wielkiej Brytanii, Francji, Hiszpanii, Malezji, Chin i Polski.
Article
Full-text available
This study presents findings from the first year of the Harbingers research project, a 3-year longitudinal study of early career researchers (ECRs), which sought to ascertain current and changing habits in scholarly communication. The study recruited 116 science and social science ECRs from seven countries who were subject to in-depth interviews, a...
Article
Full-text available
Early career researchers (ECRs) are of great interest because they are the new (and biggest) wave of researchers. They merit long and detailed investigation, and towards this end, this overarching paper provides a summary of the first-year findings of a 3-year, longitudinal study of 116 science and social science ECRs who have published nearly 1,20...
Article
Full-text available
The sharing of scholarly articles is an intrinsic and often ignored facet of the value and mission of scholarship. It is so entwined in the daily work life of scholars that it has almost become second nature, an integral part of the research process itself. This article addresses this often overlooked area of research in usage studies. In an intern...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents findings from the first year of the Harbingers research project started in 2015. The project is a 3-year longitudinal study of early career researchers (ECRs) to ascertain their current and changing habits with regard to information searching, use, sharing, and publication. The study recruited 116 researchers from seven countr...
Article
Full-text available
Early-career researchers constitute a vast pool of talent. They are the largest group of researchers and their numbers are growing fast. They are essential for enabling research to meet the needs of knowledge economies and, as the League of European Research Universities wrote in 2010, universities’ research crucially rests on their access “to the...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Early career researchers are of great interest not just because they are the new wave, but because they are also the biggest wave – they are by far the largest group of researchers (Jones, 2014). Therefore, they merit long, detailed and continuous investigation. Towards this end this report provides the first year findings (the foundation stone) fo...
Article
Full-text available
Over 660 Chinese researchers were questioned about their scholarly use, citing, and publishing and how trust is exercised in these key activities. Research showed few signs of new forms of scholarly usage behaviour taking hold, despite multiple opportunities afforded by Science 2.0 developments. Thus, for determining trustworthiness for usage purpo...
Article
Full-text available
l survey of over 3600 academic researchers examined how trustworthiness is determined when making decisions on scholarly reading, citing, and publishing in the digital age and whether social media and open access publications are having an impact on judgements. In general, the study found that traditional scholarly methods and criteria remain impor...
Article
Full-text available
The paper reports on some of the results of a research project into how changes in digital behaviour and services impacts on concepts of trust and authority held by researchers in the sciences and social sciences in the UK and the USA. Interviews were used in conjunction with a group of focus groups to establish the form and topic of questions put...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Traditional citation and download metrics have long been the standard by which we measure the use and value of scholarly articles. However, these methods neglect the usage and real‐world impact of newer technologies to access, store, and share downloaded scholarly articles. This session’s speakers will share the results of interviews, focus groups,...
Article
Full-text available
An international survey of over 3,600 researchers examined how trustworthiness and quality are determined for making decisions on scholarly reading, citing, and publishing and how scholars perceive changes in trust with new forms of scholarly communication. Although differences in determining trustworthiness and authority of scholarly resources exi...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction. This paper reports on an interview­based citation behaviour study, part of a wider study of trust in information resources, investigating why researchers chose to cite particular references in one of their publications. Their motivations are explored, with an emphasis on whether they regarded the reference as an authoritative and trus...
Article
Full-text available
The article presents one of the main findings of an international study of 4,000 academic researchers that examined how trustworthiness is determined in the digital environment when it comes to scholarly reading, citing, and publishing. The study shows that peer review is still the most trustworthy characteristic of all. There is, though, a common...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which academics are engaged with online communities for research purposes, and the research activities, platforms and tools associated with these communities. In addition, the paper aims to discover the benefits, disadvantages and barriers involved in the use of online communities, and...
Article
Full-text available
The Trust and Authority in Scholarly Communications in the Light of the Digital Transition research project 1) was a study which investigated the behaviours and attitudes of academic researchers as producers and consumers of scholarly information resources in respect to how they determine authority and trustworthiness. The research questions for th...
Article
Full-text available
The paper provides the results of the fi rst phase of the research project Trust and Authority in Scholarly Communications in the Light of the Digital Transition. It provides for an examination of the behaviours and attitudes of academic researchers as producers and consumers of scholarly information resources in the digital era in respect to how t...
Data
This survey of approximately 150 repositories assessed the achievements, impact, and success of digital repositories. Results show that while the size and use of repositories has been relatively modest, almost half of all institutions either have, or are planning, a repository mandate requiring deposit and small gains have been made in raising the...
Article
Full-text available
This survey of approximately 150 repositories assessed the achievements, impact, and success of digital repositories. Results show that while the size and use of repositories has been relatively modest, almost half of all institutions either have, or are planning, a repository mandate requiring deposit and small gains have been made in raising the...