Anthony K J Smith

Anthony K J Smith
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · Centre for Social Research in Health

GradCert Human Rights

About

27
Publications
882
Reads
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109
Citations
Introduction
Anthony K J Smith is a Research Associate at the Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW Sydney. He is employed on a 3-year postdoctoral position investigating HIV stigma and prevention. He conducts research on social aspects of health, HIV, gender and sexuality, and he uses qualitative methodologies, particularly interviews and thematic analysis.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - July 2022
UNSW Sydney
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
February 2017 - May 2018
Curtin University
Field of study
  • Human Rights
February 2015 - May 2016
Murdoch University
Field of study
  • English & Creative Writing
February 2011 - November 2014
Murdoch University
Field of study
  • Theatre/Drama

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
In the United States, clinical HIV data reported to surveillance systems operated by jurisdictional departments of public health are re-used for epidemiology and prevention. In 2018, all jurisdictions began using HIV genetic sequence data from clinical drug resistance tests to identify people living with HIV in “clusters” of others with genetically...
Article
‘Risk’ has long been at the centre of expert and popular perceptions of transmissible and stigmatised blood-borne viral infections, such as HIV and viral hepatitis. There is a substantial body of research on transmission risk among couples with mixed viral infection status (serodiscordance). But we know very little about how families affected by HI...
Article
The broadening of access to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in Australia has rekindled debates about which types of clinicians are best suited to deliver HIV prevention innovations: specialist HIV services or primary care physicians and general practitioners (GPs). We conducted 21 semi-structured qualitative interviews in 2017 with Australian H...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This research report summarises the achievements and findings of a qualitative study of clinicians’ experiences of prescribing oral HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in Australia. This study explored how clinicians have adapted to prescribing PrEP, and identified key challenges and opportunities for advancing the delivery of PrEP in different cli...
Article
In recent years, applications of big data-driven predictive analytics in public health programs have expanded, offering promises of greater efficiency and improved outcomes. This commentary considers the turn toward predictive modeling in US-based HIV public health initiatives. Through two case studies, we analyze emergent ethical problems and risk...
Article
In recognition of the broader relational aspects of viral infections, family support is considered important when someone is diagnosed with a blood-borne virus (BBV), such as HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and hepatitis B (HBV). However, families’ own support needs are often not a priority in service provision within the BBV sector. In this article, we dra...
Article
A virus has a social history. In the case of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV, this history is one involving stigma and discrimination, advocacy and activism, and recent dramatic improvements in treatment. These social histories influence the experience of people who live with the viruses, and those who work with them. One aspect of this is the...
Article
Full-text available
New medicines can transform routines and priorities in clinical practice, but how do clinicians think and feel about these changes, and how does it affect their work? In Australia, the HIV prevention regimen pre‐exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been rapidly rolled out, transforming the sexual cultures and practices of users, but less attention has b...
Article
Full-text available
In 2018, the Australian Government adopted an 'opt-out' strategy to increase participation in My Health Record (MHR), the national digital patient record system. Opt out was rationalised through discourse on the universal right to health. Media controversy ensued due to privacy fears, security and commercial exploitation of patient information. LGB...
Article
Story completion is a creative qualitative method in which participants are invited to write a story in response to a prompt or scenario (a story “stem”). In writing a story, participants are assumed to draw on their personal and social sense-making repertoires to fill in the gaps of the story, which can then be analyzed utilizing a range of qualit...
Article
Through the development and implementation of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the characteristics of PrEP users have been configured in a range of ways. Drawing on the concept of ‘imaginaries’, we consider how clinicians imagine PrEP users and related communities. We conducted 28 semi-structured interviews in 2019–2020 with PrEP-providing clin...
Article
Full-text available
Background and objectives: Healthcare practitioners struggle to provide inclusive and affirming care to transgender (trans) people. This study examined Tasmanian healthcare practitioners' and students' understandings and approaches to trans health. Method: The study comprised qualitative semi-structured interviews with 17 healthcare practitioner...
Article
Contemporary sociological work has emphasised that family is not static, but actively shaped by ideas of who and what makes family. Disclosure of an illness, including diagnosis of stigmatised infections such as HIV, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, can change the dynamics of family relationships. This paper draws on 61 qualitative semi‐str...
Article
Full-text available
Background: HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been rapidly implemented in Australia, initially through restricted access in demonstration studies, and then through prescribing across sexual health clinics and general practice settings. In 2018, PrEP was publicly subsidised for people with Medicare (universal health insurance for citizens, pe...
Article
Full-text available
Some early English language news coverage of COVID-19 epidemiology focused on studies that examined how SARS-CoV-2 (the coronavirus that causes COVID-19) was evolving at the genetic level. The use of phylogenetic methods to analyse pathogen genetic sequence data to understand disease dynamics is called 'molecular' or 'genomic' epidemiology. Many re...
Article
Sociologists have always had rich and sometimes controversial material to explore within the ‘contentious epistemological space’ of health and medicine, but the field of trans health has come to represent one of most highly contested of these domains today. When we first came together as a coalition of Australian cis and trans researchers to lead t...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The clinical management of blood borne viruses has changed rapidly in recent years. Yet social stigma remains a persistent issue. Families which include people with mixed viral status (also known as ‘serodiscordance’) play a critical role in supporting those who have been diagnosed with HIV, hepatitis B and/or hepatitis C. However, little is known...
Article
HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can alleviate anxiety about acquiring HIV, particularly for gay men and other men who have sex with men. However, research with PrEP providers has rarely examined HIV anxiety. We conducted 25 semistructured interviews in 2019-2020 with PrEP providers in New South Wales and Western Australia, and analyzed data the...
Article
The health disparities and care needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI+) patients are becoming well known. However, healthcare practitioners (HCPs) and medical students across the Global North report limited understanding of this population and express concern about their capacity to meet the needs of LGBTI + patients. To...
Article
HIV pre‐exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been embraced in Australia, making PrEP available with public funding to people at risk of HIV. Here, we consider the associated ‘problems’ of reduced condom use and sexually transmissible infections (STIs), as seen by HIV professionals. Twenty‐one interviews were conducted during May‐August 2017. All agreed...
Thesis
Full-text available
The emergence of the AIDS epidemic in New York ignited debates about the perceived centrality of ‘promiscuity’ in gay men. Prior to the epidemic, sexual adventure and numerous concurrent sexual partners were understood to be an essential characteristic of gay identity, however, with the presence of AIDS - immediately linked to sexual transmission -...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The Trust in Digital Health study was conducted by the Centre for Social Research in Health in partnership with community organisations representing four of the priority populations in the current national BBV/STI strategies: people with HIV, trans and gender diverse people, sex workers, and gay and bisexual men. Our methods included a national, online cross-sectional survey (April–June 2020) of the general population, including specific recruitment targets for the four priority populations. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with key informants (March–June 2020) with expertise in communities affected by BBVs/STIs, stigma and marginalisation. The survey sample included 2,240 eligible participants, including 600 (26.8%) classified as members of one or more priority populations. Overall, priority populations reported the lowest levels of trust in digital technologies and in some health care services, and the most frequent experiences of stigma. Key informants were keenly aware of the promise and benefits of digital health, but also concerned about the risks and consequences of communities affected by BBVs/STIs engaging with these systems. Specific issues related to different populations, but there was a shared focus on the harmful impacts of experiencing stigma and discrimination in health settings.
Archived project
In this small project, we interviewed key informants in the Australian HIV response about the roll-out of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), to consider: (1) how ‘equitable access’ to PrEP (beyond urban communities of cisgender white gay men) was conceptualised; (2) how evidence regarding the ‘problems’ of STIs and condom use was mobilised and contested, and (3) how the role of non-specialist GPs in delivering PrEP was both affirmed and questioned.
Project
The primary aim of this doctoral study is to understand Australian clinician perspectives and experiences of prescribing the new HIV prevention intervention, HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).