Anthony J Richardson

Anthony J Richardson
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation | CSIRO · And UQ School of Mathematics and Physics

University of Cape Town (PhD)

About

347
Publications
157,685
Reads
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22,832
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2005 - present
CSIRO Marine And Atmospheric Research
Position
  • Group Leader

Publications

Publications (347)
Article
Full-text available
The Mobulidae are zooplanktivorous elasmobranchs comprising two recognized species of manta rays (Manta spp.) and nine recognized species of devil rays (Mobula spp.). They are found circumglobally in tropical, subtropical and temperate coastal waters. Although mobulids have been recorded for over 400 years, critical knowledge gaps still compromise...
Article
Full-text available
The continuous plankton recorder (CPR) survey is the largest multi-decadal plankton monitoring programme in the world. It was initiated in 1931 and by the end of 2004 had counted 207,619 samples and identified 437 phyto- and zooplankton taxa throughout the North Atlantic. CPR data are used extensively by the research community and in recent years h...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change challenges organisms to adapt or move to track changes in environments in space and time. We used two measures of thermal shifts from analyses of global temperatures over the past 50 years to describe the pace of climate change that species should track: the velocity of climate change (geographic shifts of isotherms over time) and th...
Article
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Measuring plankton and associated variables as part of ocean time-series stations has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of ocean biology and ecology and their ties to ocean biogeochemistry. It will open temporal scales (e.g., resolving diel cycles) not typically sampled as a function of depth. In this review we motivate the addition...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reef mutualisms involve complex trophic ecological relationships that produce indirect effects. Excluding mutualistic cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus from reefs indirectly increases the abundance of many fishes and reduces demersal stages of their ectoparasitic prey (gnathiid isopods). Whether cleaners affect populations of planktivorous fi...
Article
The large, tropical oligotrophic gyres of the world's oceans are understood to be relatively unproductive, with low phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass, and inefficient food webs, although data are scarce. Here we investigate changes in the zooplankton assemblage along a 15 °C temperature gradient from 20 stations on the 110°E transect as part of...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Global vessel traffic is increasing alongside world economic growth. The potential for rising lethal ship strikes on endangered species of marine megafauna, such as the plankton-feeding whale shark, remains poorly understood since areas of highest overlap are seldom determined across an entire species range. Here we show how satellite...
Article
Full-text available
Marine species are moving rapidly in response to warming, often in different directions and with variations dependent on location and depth. Given the current impetus to increase the area of protected ocean to 30%, conservation planning must include the 64% of the ocean beyond national jurisdictions, which in turn requires associated design challen...
Chapter
Available at: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg2/downloads/report/IPCC_AR6_WGII_FinalDraft_Chapter03.pdf
Article
Here we investigated measurements of energy density and bioenergetic modelling for a pelagic ray, Mobula eregoodoo, to estimate its relative allocation to various bodily processes, and especially reproduction. The data revealed M. eregoodoo uses up to 21.0 and 2.5% of its annual energy budget on growth and reproduction, respectively. During pregnan...
Chapter
In the last 10 years there has been an explosion of new taxa (from species to phyla) observed using DNA-based identification tools. These tools are useful for identifying morphologically challenging and “hidden” taxa to complement light microscopy observations. Frequently, DNA tools, such as metabarcoding are used to identify whole communities of t...
Chapter
Our planet Earth is changing. Marine and freshwater ecosystems are experiencing intense natural and anthropogenic pressures that will generate unforeseen changes in their structure and functioning. The drivers of climate change have already altered the dynamics and interactions of the biotic and abiotic components in these ecosystems, and these cha...
Preprint
For over 50 years, the conceptualisation of low-nutrient oligotrophic systems having longer food chains and thus lower energy transfer to fish than their high-nutrient eutrophic counterparts ¹ has achieved the status of an ecological paradigm. However, recent global assessments indicate global fish biomass could be much higher than previously thoug...
Article
Predicting recruitment remains a fundamental problem in fisheries science. The Mortality/Growth ratio (M/G) of larval fish summarizes the competing rates of M and G in relation to cohort survival and potential recruitment. The larval cohort biomass initially declines after spawning (M > G) until transition (M/G = 1), after which the cohort may grow...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation and management of mobile marine species requires an understanding of how movement behaviour and space-use varies among individuals and populations, and how intraspecific differences influence exposure to anthropogenic threats. Because of their long-distance movements, broad distribution and long lifespan, whale sharks (Rhincodon typus)...
Article
Full-text available
Projections of climate change impacts on marine ecosystems have revealed long-term declines in global marine animal biomass and unevenly distributed impacts on fisheries. Here we apply an enhanced suite of global marine ecosystem models from the Fisheries and Marine Ecosystem Model Intercomparison Project (Fish-MIP), forced by new-generation Earth...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although zooplankton are the primary energy pathway from phytoplankton to fish, we understand little about how climate change will modify zooplankton communities and their role in marine ecosystems. Using a trait-based marine ecosystem model resolving key zooplankton groups, we assess climate change impacts on zooplankton community composition and...
Article
Full-text available
Manta rays forage for zooplankton in tropical and subtropical marine environments, which are generally nutrient-poor. Feeding often occurs at predictable locations where these large, mobile cartilaginous fishes congregate to exploit ephemeral productivity hotspots. Investigating the zooplankton dynamics that lead to such feeding aggregations remain...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is warming the ocean and impacting lower trophic level (LTL) organisms. Marine ecosystem models can provide estimates of how these changes will propagate to larger animals and impact societal services such as fisheries, but at present these estimates vary widely. A better understanding of what drives this inter-model variation will i...
Article
Full-text available
1. Climate change is redistributing terrestrial and marine biodiversity and altering fundamental ecological interactions. To conserve biodiversity and promote its long-term persistence, protected areas should account for the ecological implications of species' redistribution. Data paucity across many systems means that achieving this goal requires...
Article
Full-text available
Macroecological relationships provide insights into rules that govern ecological systems. Bergmann's rule posits that members of the same clade are larger at colder temperatures. Whether temperature drives this relationship is debated because several other potential drivers covary with temperature. We conducted a near‐global comparative analysis on...
Article
Full-text available
Global trends in the occurrence, toxicity and risk posed by harmful algal blooms to natural systems, human health and coastal economies are poorly constrained, but are widely thought to be increasing due to climate change and nutrient pollution. Here, we conduct a statistical analysis on a global dataset extracted from the Harmful Algae Event Datab...
Article
The large hemi-discoid diatom Palmerina ostenfeldii was common in subtropical Moreton Bay, Australia, following a flood in January 2011. All diatom cells exhibited diagnostic subapical folds settled by loricate peritrich ciliates, but which readily abandoned stressed diatom cells. We characterized both diatoms and ciliates by morphological and mole...
Article
Full-text available
Across the world’s oceans, western boundary currents are strengthening and warming faster than the global average. This is expected to have large impacts on the distribution of pelagic fishes, as their dispersal and physiological range limits shift. Monitoring the distribution of larval fish assemblages, sampled with plankton nets, allows for popul...
Article
Full-text available
The black marlin Istiompax indica is an apex marine predator and is susceptible to overfishing. The movement ecology of the species remains poorly-known, particularly within the Indian Ocean, which has hampered assessment of their conservation status and fisheries management requirements. Here, we used pop-up archival satellite tags to track I. ind...
Preprint
Full-text available
Marine species are moving rapidly in response to warming, often in different directions and with variations by location and depth. This poses challenges to conventional reserve design. We develop a three-dimensional planning approach for the high seas that conserves biodiversity, minimises exposure to climate change, retains species within reserve...
Article
The latitudinal gradient in species richness, with more species in the tropics and richness declining with latitude, is widely known and has been assumed to be stable over recent centuries. We analyzed data on 48,661 marine animal species since 1955, accounting for sampling variation, to assess whether the global latitudinal gradient in species ric...
Article
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The continental shelf in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean is among the six richest marine regions for biodiversity in the Southern Hemisphere, and its subtropical region is one of the fastest-warming hotspots. Thus, climate change could profoundly affect future species distributions. We investigated future climate-induced changes in fish larvae and...
Article
Full-text available
• Mutualism is a form of symbiosis whereby both parties benefit from the relationship. An example is cleaning symbiosis, which has been observed in terrestrial and marine environments. The most recognized form of marine cleaning symbiosis is that of cleaner fishes and their clients. • Cleaner species set up cleaning stations on the reef, and other...
Article
Full-text available
Subtropical systems experience occasional severe floods, dramatically altering the phytoplankton community structure, in response to changes in salinity, nutrients, and light. This study examined the effects of a 1:100 year summer flood on the phytoplankton community in an Australian subtropical bay – Moreton Bay – over 48 weeks, from January to De...
Article
Despite their critical role as the main energy pathway between phytoplankton and fish, the functional complexity of zooplankton is typically poorly resolved in marine ecosystem models. Trait-based approaches—where zooplankton are represented with functional traits such as body size—could help improve the resolution of zooplankton in marine ecosyste...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding impacts of global warming on phytoplankton–the foundation of marine ecosystems–is critical to predicting changes in future biodiversity, ocean productivity, and ultimately fisheries production. Using phytoplankton community abundance and environmental data that span ∼90 years (1931–2019) from a long-term Pacific Ocean coastal station...
Article
Full-text available
Zooplankton biomass data have been collected in Australian waters since the 1930s, yet most datasets have been unavailable to the research community. We have searched archives, scanned the primary and grey literature, and contacted researchers, to collate 49187 records of marine zooplankton biomass from waters around Australia (0-60°S, 110-160°E)....
Article
Full-text available
Reef manta rays (Mobula alfredi) are capable of long-distance dispersal when habitat is continuous. In the Ningaloo Reef World Heritage Area located on Australia’s mid-west coast, M. alfredi is sighted year-round and is a focal species for ecotourism in the region. Despite value to local tourism and demographic vulnerability to exploitation, basic...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is redistributing terrestrial and marine biodiversity and altering fundamental ecological interactions. To adequately conserve biodiversity and promote its long-term persistence, protected areas should account for the ecological implications of species redistribution. Data paucity across many systems means that achieving this goal re...
Article
Full-text available
Slower warming in the deep ocean encourages a perception that its biodiversity is less exposed to climate change than that of surface waters. We challenge this notion by analysing climate velocity, which provides expectations for species’ range shifts. We find that contemporary (1955–2005) climate velocities are faster in the deep ocean than at the...
Article
The Great Barrier Reef is a UNESCO World Heritage Area that has been assessed as having a very poor outlook and needing urgent intervention. The eReefs hydrodynamic-biogeochemical models are used to complement monitoring, facilitate data interpretation and support policy decisions. Management and policy for the Great Barrier Reef are politically co...
Book
Full-text available
Marine assessments are important tools for examining the state and trends of marine systems at regional, national, and global scales. The most robust assessments are data-driven and underpinned by time series of internationally accepted ecosystem indicators, based on measurement of physical, chemical, and biological variables. The collating, synthe...
Article
Full-text available
The known distribution of manta rays in Australian waters is patchy, with records primarily centred around tourism hotspots. We collated 11,614 records of M. alfredi from photo‐ID databases (n= 10,715), aerial surveys (n= 378) and online reports (n= 521). The study confirms an uninterrupted coastal distribution from north of 26°S and 31°S on the we...
Article
We reviewed 15572 Australian species-level records of the marine planktonic dinoflagellate Tripos Bory (formerly Ceratium Schrank, a genus now restricted to freshwater species). The genus is represented by over 50 species and numerous varieties and forms in Australian tropical, subtropical and temperate marine waters and the Southern Ocean. There e...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing vessel traffic in the marine environment due to commercial and recreational activities has amplified the number of conflicts with marine animals. However, there are limited multi-year observations of the healing rate of marine animals following vessel strike. Here we document the healing rate of a reef manta ray Mobula alfredi, following...
Chapter
Moreton Bay is a subtropical bay in south east Queensland that supports important populations of seabirds, marine mammals, reptiles and fish. Zooplankton, being small, are often overlooked, but are important nutrient cyclers and a critical link between primary producers and higher trophic levels. Here we synthesise available information on the zoop...
Chapter
Full-text available
We present three case studies about how citizen scientists contribute to research in the Moreton Bay Marine Park: ‘Project Manta’, ‘Grey Nurse Shark Watch’ and ‘Dolphin Watchers’. We identify several challenges with marine megafauna citizen science programs and make recommendations to address these challenges and propose future directions to improv...
Preprint
Full-text available
The reef manta ray, Mobula alfredi, occurs in tropical and warm temperate coastal waters, and around islands and reefs in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Published records that relate to the distribution of M. alfredi in the south-east Indian and south-west Pacific Oceans are largely restricted to locations where there is a focus on manta ray ecotou...
Article
Full-text available
Recent increases in the frequency of extreme climate events (ECEs) such as heatwaves and floods have been attributed to climate change, and could have pronounced ecosystem and evolutionary impacts because they provide little opportunity for organisms to acclimate or adapt. Here we synthesize information on a series of ECEs in Australia from 2011 to...
Article
Full-text available
Research into the movement ecology of terrestrial and marine animals is growing globally, especially for threatened species. Understanding how far an animal can move and the extent of its range can inform conservation planning and management. On the east coast of Australia, reef manta rays Mobula alfredi are the subject of a photographic identifica...
Article
Shark and ray megafauna have crucial roles as top predators in many marine ecosystems, but are currently among the most threatened vertebrates and, based on historical extinctions, may be highly susceptible to future environmental perturbations. However, our understanding of their energetics lags behind that of other taxa. Such knowledge is require...
Article
Full-text available
Plankton are the base of marine food webs, essential to sustaining fisheries and other marine life. Continuous Plankton Recorders (CPRs) have sampled plankton for decades in both hemispheres and several regional seas. CPR research has been integral to advancing understanding of plankton dynamics and informing policy and management decisions. We des...
Article
The impact of climate change on biodiversity is a pressing concern. A study now combines experimental data with careful modelling to compare the vulnerability to warming of animal species on land and in the ocean.
Chapter
An overview of the application of plankton ecology has to managers. Several case studies from the real-world examples.
Book
Healthy waterways and oceans are essential for our increasingly urbanised world. Yet monitoring water quality in aquatic environments is a challenge, as it varies from hour to hour due to stormwater and currents. Being at the base of the aquatic food web and present in huge numbers, plankton are strongly influenced by changes in environment and pro...
Chapter
Background to why plankton are important, their role in food webs, their sizes etc. Also a number of fun facts about plankton and an introduction to what we can learn from studying them.