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Anthony J. Olejniczak

Anthony J. Olejniczak
Academic Analytics Research Center (AARC)

M.A., Ph.D.

About

88
Publications
17,856
Reads
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2,896
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2006 - March 2009
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
June 2004 - May 2006
Stony Brook University
Field of study
  • Anthropological Sciences
August 2000 - May 2004
Stony Brook University
Field of study
  • Anthropological Sciences
September 1997 - May 2000
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (88)
Preprint
Some states in the U.S. have traditionally received less federal research funding than other states. The National Science Foundation (NSF) created a program in 1979, called the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) to enhance the research competitiveness in such EPSCoR states. While it is well established that the EPSCoR s...
Article
In 1959 Lord Charles Percy Snow delivered a scathing critique of the bifurcation of scientists into two cultures: The humanists and the natural scientists. Five decades later, Jerome Kagan retorted that the university has actually evolved into three cultures—adding the social sciences as a distinct discipline with its own language, aims, and commit...
Article
The number of scholarly journal articles published each year is growing, but little is known about the relationship between journal article growth and other forms of scholarly dissemination (e.g., books and monographs). Journal articles are the de facto currency of evaluation and prestige in STEM fields, but social scientists routinely publish book...
Article
Full-text available
The need for research universities to understand expectations for scholarly publishing across a wide array of disciplines is vital to their self-understanding and to decision-making arising from that understanding. Administrators, staff, and faculty members serve on college-level executive committees, provost-level promotion and tenure committees,...
Preprint
Over the past few years, the rate of journal article publication has increased in most academic disciplines - in some cases more than doubling in the past decade. While journal articles are the de facto currency of knowledge production in many science disciplines, social science scholars routinely publish books as well as journal articles. The soci...
Preprint
In the tables presented here (https://osf.io/myaut/), we show data pertaining to publication rates and publication venues across 170 academic disciplines. We model the publication patterns of faculty members at U.S. research universities at different career stages, and in so doing we hope to provide a nuanced and up-to-date reference for faculty me...
Presentation
Full-text available
The aging of the professoriate throughout the end of the 20th century and the early years of the 2000’s (both before and after the end of mandatory retirement in the United States, ca. 1994) has become a source of concern for some scholars and research administrators, who posit that the “greying” of the academy results in lower research activity an...
Article
Full-text available
The aging of the professoriate throughout the end of the twentieth century and the early years of the 2000′s (both before and after the end of mandatory retirement in the United States, ca. 1994) has become a source of concern for some scholars and research administrators, who posit that the “greying” of the academy results in lower research activi...
Presentation
Full-text available
The aging of the professoriate is often characterized as a source of concern for higher education researchers and administrators in the United States. Do senior faculty remain active in their later years and contribute to the advancement of scholarship when there is no mandatory retirement? We extracted publication counts from the Academic Analytic...
Article
Full-text available
The open access (OA) publication movement aims to present research literature to the public at no cost and with no restrictions. While the democratization of access to scholarly literature is a primary focus of the movement, it remains unclear whether OA has uniformly democratized the corpus of freely available research, or whether authors who choo...
Preprint
Full-text available
The adoption of open access (OA) publishing has grown rapidly in the last two decades; an increasing share of the research literature is available to the public at no cost and with no restrictions. Despite the enormous growth of OA publishing, few studies have explored the characteristics of the authors who choose to publish their research as OA ar...
Presentation
The prestige hierarchy of American higher education institutions is increasingly well documented, and patterns of graduate student hiring appear to follow the Matthew principle (graduates of more prestigious institutions tend to be hired by institutions of similar prestige). We explored academic hiring at 390 American research universities across a...
Preprint
Full-text available
The aging of the professoriate is a source of concern for research in the United States. Do senior faculty remain active and contribute to scientific advancement when there is no mandatory retirement? This study quantifies senior faculty publication activity in six broad fields, comparing their publication rates to their younger colleagues for publ...
Article
Full-text available
Scholars have debated the taxonomic identity of isolated primate teeth from the Asian Pleistocene for over a century, which is complicated by morphological and metric convergence between orangutan (Pongo) and hominin (Homo) molariform teeth. Like Homo erectus, Pongo once showed considerable dental variation and a wide distribution throughout mainla...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Aterian fossil hominins represent one of the most abundant series of human remains associated with Middle Stone Age/Middle Paleolithic assemblages in Africa. Their dates have been revised and they are now mostly assigned to a period between 90 and 35 ka. Although the Aterian human fossil record is exclusively Moroccan, Aterian assemblages are f...
Article
The aim of this study is to describe the morphology of the roots and root canals of permanent lower second premolars (LP4s) with fully developed roots of five hominin groups: Homo sp. (ATE9-1 specimen) from Atapuerca-Sima del Elefante locality, H. antecessor (ATD6-4 and ATD6-125) from Atapuerca-Gran Dolina TD6 locality, H. heidelbergensis from Atap...
Article
We present a detailed morphological comparative study of the hominin mandible ATE9-1 recovered in 2007 from the Sima del Elefante cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos, northern Spain. Paleomagnetic analyses, biostratigraphical studies, and quantitative data obtained through nuclide cosmogenic methods, place this specimen in the Early Pleistocen...
Article
Geometric morphometric techniques may offer a promising methodological approach to analyze evolutionary novelties in a quantitative framework. Nevertheless, and despite continuous improvements to this methodology, the inclusion of novel features in these studies presents some difficulties. In the present study, different methods to explicitly inclu...
Article
Here we present a detailed palaeopathological study of the hominin mandible ATE9-1 found at the Sima del Elefante site (TE), Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. This fossil represents the earliest hominin remains from Western Europe with an age of ca. 1.3 Ma. The specimen displays several dento-gnathic lesions; the antiquity and geographic location of this...
Chapter
Full-text available
Studies of dental development have reported conflicting results regarding whether Neanderthal growth and development was similar to that of modern humans. The discovery of a partial permanent maxillary juvenile dentition (OR-1) from the Obi-Rakhmat Grotto, Uzbekistan, provides the opportunity to assess dental development and age at death in a Paleo...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have an unusual life history, with an early weaning age, long childhood, late first reproduction, short interbirth intervals, and long lifespan. In contrast, great apes wean later, reproduce earlier, and have longer intervals between births. Despite 80 y of speculation, the origins of these developmental patterns in Homo sapiens remain unkno...
Article
Full-text available
Molar crown morphology varies among primates from relatively simple in some taxa to more complex in others, with such variability having both functional and taxonomic significance. In addition to the primary cusps, crown surface complexity derives from the presence of crests, cuspules, and crenulations. Developmentally, this complexity results from...
Article
We estimate the effects of faculty scholarly productivity and institutional characteristics on the distribution of federally funded research grants. Although faculty with more publications and citations have a greater likelihood of securing competitive research grants than their less prolific peers, the benefit of having published papers in terms o...
Article
Full-text available
Résumé : une deuxième molaire déciduale inférieure droite a été découverte en 1984 à l'entrée du Trou de l'abîme, à couvin (Belgique). Dans les années qui ont suivi la fouille, l'interprétation du fossile était restée délicate pour différentes raisons : (1) l'absence d'éléments de diagnose taxinomique qui auraient permis d'attribuer la dent à H. (s...
Article
Full-text available
Les progrès réalisés ces dernières années dans diverses disciplines permettent de réinterpréter la séquence pléistocène du Trou de l’Abîme à Couvin et les vestiges qui y ont été exhumés. La dent humaine découverte en 1984 peut ainsi être attribuée à l’Homme de Néandertal sur base de l’analyse de sa morphologie et de l’épaisseur de son émail. Le rée...
Article
A human lower right deciduous second molar was discovered in 1984 at the entrance of Trou de l'Abîme at Couvin (Belgium). In subsequent years the interpretation of this fossil remained difficult for various reasons: (1) the lack of taxonomically diagnostic elements which would support its attribution to either Homo (sapiens) neanderthalensis or H....
Article
Mandibular corpus form is thought to reflect masticatory function and the size of the dentition, but there is no universal association between crown dimensions and corpus size across anthropoids. Previous research was based on the assumption that crown size is an appropriate proxy for overall tooth size, but this hypothesis remains largely untested...
Article
Full-text available
Two molars recovered at Trinil, Java, have been the subject of more than a century of debate since their discovery by Eugène Dubois in 1891–92. These molars have been a;ributed to several ape and human taxa (including Pan and Meganthropus), although most studies agree that they are either fossil Pongo or Homo erectus molars. Compli‑ cating the asse...
Article
Full-text available
Developmental and structural affinities between modern human and Neanderthal dental remains continue to be a subject of debate as well as their utility for informing assessments of life history and taxonomy. Excavation of the Middle Paleolithic cave site Lakonis in southern Greece has yielded a lower third molar (LKH 1). Here, we detail the crown d...
Article
Full-text available
Thick molar enamel is among the few diagnostic characters of hominins which are measurable in fossil specimens. Despite a long history of study and characterization of Paranthropus molars as relatively 'hyper-thick', only a few tooth fragments and controlled planes of section (designed to be proxies of whole-crown thickness) have been measured. Her...
Article
Full-text available
The thickness of dental enamel is often discussed in paleoanthropological literature, particularly with regard to differences in growth, health, and diet between Neandertals and modern humans. Paleoanthropologists employ enamel thickness in paleodietary and taxonomic studies regarding earlier hominins, but variation in enamel thickness within the g...
Article
Full-text available
In addition to evidence for bipedality in some fossil taxa, molar enamel thickness is among the few characters distinguishing (thick-enameled) hominins from the (thin-enameled) African apes. Despite the importance of enamel thickness in taxonomic discussions and a long history of scholarship, measurements of enamel thickness are performed almost ex...
Article
Full-text available
Discrete dental traits are used as proxies for biological relatedness among modern human populations and for alpha taxonomy and phylogeny reconstruction within the hominin clade. We present a comparison of the expression of lower molar dental traits (cusp 6, cusp 7, trigonid crest pattern, and protostylid) at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) in a...
Article
Molar enamel thickness has played an important role in the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and dietary assessments of fossil primate teeth for nearly 90 years. Despite the frequency with which enamel thickness is discussed in paleoanthropological discourse, methods used to attain information about enamel thickness are destructive and record information fr...
Article
We estimate the effect of faculty productivity and institutional characteristics on the distribution of federally-funded research grants. Although faculties with more publications and citations have a higher propensity to win research grants, heterogeneous grant obtaining propensity stemming from institutional level characteristics exists among fac...
Article
Full-text available
Absolutely thick molar enamel is con- sistent with large body size estimates and dietary inferences about Gigantopithecus blacki, which focus on tough or fibrous vegetation. In this study, 10 G. blacki molars demonstrating various stages of attri- tion were imaged using high-resolution microtomography. Three-dimensional average enamel thickness and...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of life history (pace of growth and reproduction) was crucial to ancient hominin adaptations. The study of dental development facilitates assessment of growth and development in fossil hominins with greater precision than other skeletal analyses. During tooth formation, biological rhythms manifest in enamel and dentine, creating a per...
Article
Full-text available
The shape of the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) in primate molars is regarded as a potential indicator of phylogenetic relatedness because it may be morphologically more conservative than the outer enamel surface (OES), and it may preserve vestigial features (e.g., cuspules, accessory ridges, and remnants of cingula) that are not manifest at the OES...
Article
Full-text available
Modern micro-computed tomography techniques allow the accurate visualization of internal dental structures, and are becoming widely used within (paleo-) anthropological dental studies. There exist several types and name brands of microtomographic systems, however, which have been demonstrated to produce images that vary in resolution and signal-to-...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have reported on enamel and dentine development in hominoid molars, although little is known about intraspecific incremental feature variation. Furthermore, a recent histological study suggested that there is little or no time between age at chimpanzee crown completion and age at molar eruption, which is unlikely given that root gr...
Book
Full-text available
Phylogenetic, paleodietary, and developmental studies of hominoid primates frequently make use of the post-canine dentition, in particular molar teeth. To study the thickness and shape of molar enamel and dentine, internal dental structures must be revealed (e.g., the location of dentine horn apices), typically necessitating the production of physi...
Book
Full-text available
Previous histological studies of small samples of chimpanzee and human molars suggested similarities in crown formation time, which is surprising given substantial life history differences. As part of an on-going study of hominoid molar development, we report on the largest-known sample of chimpanzee and human molars, including re-evaluation of pre...
Article
Full-text available
One highly debated issue in palaeoanthropology is that of modern human origins, particularly the issue of when 'anatomically modern humans' (AMH) from the African Middle Stone Age became fully modern. While studies of cranial and external dental morphology suggest a modern transition occurred 150 000-200 000 years ago, little is known about dental...
Article
Tooth enamel thickness has long been an important character in studies of primate and especially hominin phylogeny, taxonomy, and adaptation. Current methods for accurately assessing enamel thickness involve the physical sectioning of teeth, because measurements of enamel thickness using some radiographic techniques are unreliable. However, because...