Anthony Crupi

Anthony Crupi
Alaska Department of Fish and Game | ADFG · Division of Wildlife Conservation

MS Wildlife Ecology

About

15
Publications
6,406
Reads
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78
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
76 Citations
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Introduction
Anthony Crupi currently works at the Division of Wildlife Conservation, Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Anthony does research in bear ecology. Their current project is 'Brown bear population density and habitat selection on the northern mainland coast of Southeast Alaska.'
Education
January 2001 - May 2004
Utah State University
Field of study
  • Wildlife Ecology
August 1991 - May 1995
Duke University
Field of study
  • Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

Publications

Publications (15)
Technical Report
Full-text available
Conservation of brown bear (Ursus arctos) populations requires managers to reliably and efficiently estimate abundance. With the recent development of spatially-explicit capture–recapture (SECR) models, bear density can now be estimated from detection parameters relative to the spatial distribution of detectors and animal movements, and abundance c...
Article
Full-text available
Glacier bears are a rare grey color morph of American black bear (Ursus americanus ) found only in northern Southeast Alaska and a small portion of western Canada. We examine contemporary genetic population structure of black bears within the geographic extent of glacier bears and explore how this structure relates to pelage color and landscape fea...
Article
Full-text available
Winter recreation and tourism continue to expand worldwide, and where these activities overlap with valuable wildlife habitat, there is greater potential for conservation concerns. Wildlife populations can be particularly vulnerable to disturbance in alpine habitats as helicopters and snowmachines are increasingly used to access remote backcountry...
Article
Full-text available
Apex predators play keystone roles in ecosystems through top-down control, but the effects of apex omnivores on ecosystems could be more varied because changes in the resource base alter their densities and reverberate through ecosystems in complex ways. In coastal temperate ecosystems throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, anadromous salmon o...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract As species’ distributions shift in response to changing environmental conditions, novel species interactions are emerging, challenging researchers and managers alike. When new species enter existing ecological communities, their effects on fellow guild members are difficult to predict. Competition between species within the same guild can...
Article
Color variation is a frequent evolutionary substrate for camouflage in small mammals, but the underlying genetics and evolutionary forces that drive color variation in natural populations of large mammals are mostly unexplained. The American black bear, Ursus americanus (U. americanus), exhibits a range of colors including the cinnamon morph, which...
Preprint
Full-text available
Color variation is a frequent evolutionary substrate for camouflage in small mammals but the underlying genetics and evolutionary forces that drive color variation in natural populations of large mammals are mostly unexplained. The American black bear, Ursus americanus , exhibits a range of colors including the cinnamon morph which has a similar co...
Article
Full-text available
Managing wildlife populations in the face of global change requires regular data on the abundance and distribution of wild animals but acquiring these over appropriate spatial scales in a sustainable way has proven challenging. Here we present the data from Snapshot USA 2020, a second annual national mammal survey of the United States of America. T...
Article
Full-text available
Managing wildlife populations in the face of global change requires regular data on the abundance and distribution of wild animals, but acquiring these over appropriate spatial scales in a sustainable way has proven challenging. Here we present the data from Snapshot USA 2020, a second annual national mammal survey of the locations across 103 array...
Article
Timber interests target coastal temperate rainforests, and within them stands composed of large trees potentially selected by American black bears (Ursus americanus) for denning. We identified the location of 75 black bear dens (used ≥14 days) in an intensively logged area on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, USA. We ground‐visited a subset (n = 43)...
Article
Full-text available
With the accelerating pace of global change, it is imperative that we obtain rapid inventories of the status and distribution of wildlife for ecological inferences and conservation planning. To address this challenge, we launched the SNAPSHOT USA project, a collaborative survey of terrestrial wildlife populations using camera traps across the Unite...
Article
Full-text available
We collected blood and serum from 155 brown bears ( Ursus arctos) inhabiting five locations in Alaska during 2013-16 and tested samples for evidence of prior exposure to a suite of bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents. Antibody seroprevalence among Alaska brown bears was estimated to be 15% for Brucella spp., 10% for Francisella tularensis, 7% fo...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We studied movement patterns, home range size, and resource selection of brown bears (Ursus arctos) near the Malaspina Glacier, Southeast Alaska, during 2009 to 2013. The primary purpose of this research was to provide resource managers with spatial use and resource selection information useful for managing a sustainable population of brown bears i...
Article
Full-text available
We studied spatial use, habitat selection, and population ecology of brown bears (Ursus arctos) in the proposed corridor of the Juneau Access Improvements Project (JAIP) road during 2006 to 2010. The primary purpose of this research was to provide population and habitat information useful for managing a sustainable population of brown bears in Bern...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The goal of this project is to collect the biological data necessary to manage for a sustainable brown bear population. Objectives: 1. Investigate spatial relationships of brown bears in GMU 1D including seasonal home range estimates and habitat selection. 2. Estimate harvest rate. 3. Estimate population density and abundance. 4. Monitor brown bear survival. 5. Examine brown bear den site selection.
Project
Our primary objective was to estimate brown bear population density and abundance for the northern mainland coast of Southeast Alaska, near Yakutat. We used a noninvasive DNA-based mark–recapture approach using hair samples and developed spatially-explicit capture–recapture models (SECR) to obtain estimates during late summer 2013.