Annique van der Boon

Annique van der Boon
University of Oslo · Centre for Earth Evolution and Dynamics

PhD

About

39
Publications
13,419
Reads
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189
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2021 - present
University of Oslo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2017 - March 2021
University of Liverpool
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2013 - March 2017
Utrecht University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Birth of Paratethys and associated onset of anoxic conditions to relate anoxia to climate change around the Eocene-Oligocene transition or tectonics. Magnetostratigraphy, Ar-Ar and geochemistry on Eocene volcanics of Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Iran.
Education
February 2011 - January 2013
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Geology
September 2007 - July 2010
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Earth Sciences

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
The sedimentary succession along the Belaya River (North Caucasus) provides a record of middle Eocene to Miocene sediments. This time interval is well known for its important climatic transitions (e.g., Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) and Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT)), and changes in basin configuration from Peri-Tethys to Paratethys. The...
Article
Full-text available
The field work conducted in 2019 on Prohibition Creek, SE of Norman Wells, was a joint effort of GSC and the DEEP research group of the University of Liverpool (UK) aimed to remeasure and sample the Eifelian-Frasnian succession of the Hume Formation and the Horn River Group. The latter is well exposed on Prohibition Creek and recommended as a refer...
Article
Full-text available
The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO), a ∼500 kyr episode of global warming that initiated at ∼ 40.5 Ma, is postulated to be driven by a net increase in volcanic carbon input, but a direct source has not been identified. Here we show, based on new and previously published radiometric ages of volcanic rocks, that the interval spanning the MECO c...
Article
Full-text available
Palaeomagnetism is a relatively unknown part of Earth sciences that is not well integrated into the school curriculum in the UK. Throughout recent years, there has been a decline in the number of Earth science students in the UK. In 2018 and 2019, we developed outreach activities and resources to introduce the scientifically engaged general public...
Article
Full-text available
The Devonian has long been a problematic period for paleomagnetism. Devonian paleomagnetic data are generally difficult to interpret and have complex partial or full overprints– problems that arise in data obtained from both sedimentary and igneous rocks. As a result, the reconstruction of tectonic plate motions, largely performed using apparent po...
Preprint
Full-text available
Norwegian version of '10 things you might not know about Earth's magnetic field'
Article
The second half of the Devonian featured widespread deposition of organic matter on continental shelves. Distinct pulses of anoxic sediments, associated with positive δ13C excursions, are recognized as Devonian anoxic or carbon-cycle perturbation events. Many of these events are coupled with turnovers in marine faunas, including those ranked as maj...
Article
Palaeomagnetic field intensity measurements, derived from rocks with ages that span geological time, provide a crucial constraint on the evolution of Earth’s deep interior and its magnetic environment. The palaeointensity database PINT has been updated to version v.8.0.0 and includes palaeointensity site-mean records spanning an interval from 50 ka...
Preprint
Full-text available
Paleomagnetism is a relatively unknown part of Earth sciences that is not well integrated into the school curriculum in the United Kingdom. Throughout recent years, there has been a decline in the number of Earth science students in the UK. In 2018 and 2019, we developed outreach activities and resources to introduce the scientifically-engaged gene...
Presentation
Full-text available
With geoscience student numbers dwindling, there is a strong need for Earth scientists to enthuse a new generation of prospective students. We created several hands-on activities to introduce members of the general public of all ages to the fundamentals of, and current research in paleomagnetism. We developed these activities at different outreach...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO), a ~500 kyr episode of global warming that initiated at ~40.5 Ma, is postulated to be driven by a net increase in volcanic carbon input, but a direct source has not been identified. Here we show, based on new and previously published radiometric ages of volcanic rocks, that the interval spanning t...
Article
The Talesh Mountains (NW Iran) witnessed a long deformation history from the Triassic Cimmerian orogeny to the ongoing Arabia-Eurasia collision. This protracted multi-stage deformation has generated a remarkably curved orogen with a puzzling kinematic and deformational history. In this study, we investigate the origin of the Talesh curvature throug...
Preprint
Full-text available
AGU Centennial poster
Preprint
Full-text available
AGU Centennial poster
Preprint
Full-text available
AGU Centennial poster
Preprint
Full-text available
AGU Centennial poster
Article
The sedimentary succession along the Belaya River (North Caucasus) provides a record of middle Eocene to Miocene sediments. This time interval is well known for its important climatic transitions (e.g., Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) and Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT)), and changes in basin configuration from Peri-Tethys to Paratethys. The...
Poster
Full-text available
We studied two partly overlapping sections in limestones in southern Cumbria, to constrain a magnetostratigraphy through most of the Visean (Fig. 1, 4) (early Carboniferous), Meathop quarry and Trowbarrow quarry. The Visean in this area is roughly 650 m thick and is composed of grainstones, packstones and wackestones, with minor amounts of shale. A...
Preprint
Full-text available
Preprint
Full-text available
Public engagement document explaining paleomagnetism to the public
Poster
Full-text available
Summarize the results from Cumbria, on 2 sites: Meathop and Trowbarrow quarry, the Magnetic measurements on Carboniferous limestones.
Article
The section of Maikop deposits on the Belaya River upstream of the town of Maikop is characteristic of Western and Central Ciscaucasia; it is well exposed and well-studied and can be considered as the type section of the Maikop Group. The section shows a continuous transition from the underlying white marl of the Belaya Glina Formation to dark clay...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
Proposal I wrote for a Mendenhall fellowship, unsuccessful.
Article
Since the late Eocene, convergence and subsequent collision between Arabia and Eurasia was accommo-dated both in the overriding Eurasian plate forming the Greater Caucasus orogen and the Iranian plateau, and by subduction and accretion of the Neotethys and Arabian margin forming the East Anatolian plateau and the Zagros. To quantify how much Arabia...
Article
During the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), a major palaeoenvironmental change took place in the Paratethys Sea of central Eurasia. Restricted connectivity and increased stratification resulted in wide-spread deposition of organic-rich sediments which nowadays make up important hydrocarbon source rocks. The North Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB) was...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from the Bartonian to the Priabonian, as traditionally understood, has long been associated with a series of extinctions and originations in several microfossil groups. The planktonic forami-nifer genus Morozovelloides and large species of Acarinina suffered a rapid global extinction, as did many radiolarians. Calcareous nannofossils...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Greater Caucasus, extending from the Black Sea in the West to the Caspian Sea in the East, is the world's second largest active collisional orogen. It differs from traditional orogens in its relatively short length (~1100km) and its location >350 km away from a plate boundary (Arabia-Eurasia). Causes for its formation since the Late Eocene are...
Poster
Full-text available
A fort Hoofddijk team presentation. People at the paleomagnetic Laboratory ‘Fort Hoofddijk’ study the history of the geomagnetic field and explore the way the field is recorded in rocks. Knowledge of the ancient magnetic field is used for past geomagnetic field behaviour, magnetostratigraphic dating and reconstruction of tectonic rotations. This kn...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from the Bartonian to the Priabonian, as traditionally understood, has long been associated with a series of extinctions and originations in several microfossil groups. The planktonic forami- nifer genus Morozovelloides and large species of Acarinina suffered a rapid global extinction, as did many radiolarians. Calcareous nannofossil...
Article
Full-text available
The Maikop Series forms an important source rock in the former Paratethys. Deposition is often interpreted as anoxic, linked to restriction of the Paratethys. The Pirembel formation in the Talysh Mountains (Azerbaijan) is attributed to the Maikop Series and was deposited above the Eocene volcanic Peshtasar formation. Dating the onset of anoxia coul...
Thesis
Full-text available
The Maikop series are composed of a thick succession of black shales, and are considered the most important source rock for hydrocarbons in the Caspian basin. The type section of this formation is located near the city of Maykop in Russia, north of the Greater Caucasus. Corresponding anoxic sediments can be traced in a vast area from Austria to Chi...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Some stuff that I made for outreach. CC license, so feel free to use, adapt, etc.
Archived project
Paratethys was a large epicontinental sea, stretching from Germany to China at the beginning of the Oligocene (~34 Myr ago), that progressively retreated by a complex combination of basin infill, glacio-eustatic sea-level lowering and tectonic uplift to its present-day remnants: Black Sea, Caspian Sea and Aral Lake. The influence of Paratethys on global change is still a great unknown, mainly through lack of relevant studies in this terra incognita, although model studies suggest a major effect of sea retreat on climate and environment. The team in this project aims to comprehend the causes of the extreme environmental changes that occurred in Central Eurasia. High-resolution geochronology together with integrated stratigraphy and geochemical proxies (deuterium, strontium, neodymium) are critical to unravel internal (geodynamics, tectonic uplift) from external (climate, glacio-eustatic sea-level change) forcing factors and to resolve the effects of Paratethys restriction (regional climate perturbations, biotic crises, aridification). Three time slices exist when progressive sea retreat and variations in interbasinal connectivity generated extreme environmental changes: 1) The birth of Paratethys (~34 Ma), resulting in deposition of anoxic shales during a complex combination of tectonic uplift and global cooling. 2) Its midlife crisis in the middle Miocene (~14-11 Ma) when gateway restriction created massive salt deposits during the middle Miocene climate transition. 3) The demise of Paratethys (~9-4 Ma), transforming open marine environments into lacustrine deltaic systems, and leading to alternating phases of desiccation and flooding. Updating the chronostratigraphic framework means that we need to critically revise existing (bio)stratigraphic data according to the newest standards, and, above all, we need to look and communicate beyond borders to correlate critical Paratethys events. The new stratigraphic insights can be used for numerical modeling studies. Moreover, fundamental rock magnetic studies are needed to standardize microfossil iron sulphide (greigite) techniques, intended to revolutionize magnetostratigraphic dating in brackish-lacustrine paleoenvironments. This multi-disciplinary approach provides the only way to attain a comprehensive system view on long-term Paratethys evolution.