Annette Jäckle

Annette Jäckle
University of Essex · Institute for Social and Economic Research

PhD
Professor of Survey Methodology and Associate Director of Innovations for the UK Household Longitudinal Study

About

58
Publications
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1,204
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Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Full-text available
It is increasingly common for researchers to link survey data to administrative data. If several administrative data sources are of interest, respondents are required to give consent to each of them, meaning that multiple consent questions have to be included in one survey. Existing literature suggests that individual consent varies widely between...
Article
Full-text available
Mobile apps are an attractive and versatile method of collecting data in the social and behavioural sciences. In samples of the general population, however, participation in app-based data collection is still rather low. In this paper, we examine two potential ways of increasing participation and potentially reducing participation bias in app-based...
Chapter
This chapter reviews different process‐generated data sources and new technologies that could be used to enhance the measurement of household finances in longitudinal surveys. It examines financial aggregators, loyalty cards, credit and debit cards, credit ratings, barcode scanning, receipt scanning, and mobile apps. The chapter aims to contribute...
Chapter
Dependent interviewing (DI) is a technique used in longitudinal surveys, whereby answers given in an interview are used to determine question routing or wording in the following interview. In this chapter, the authors examine which question format is best by studying interviewer and respondent behaviours, and how the question wording affects these....
Chapter
Linking data from longitudinal surveys to administrative records (whether held by government or private entities) is an increasingly attractive option for several reasons. As longitudinal surveys continue to respond to pressures to increase efficiency, and as new survey modes are developed, the use of mixed‐mode data collection is increasing. Much...
Article
Measurement and analysis of change is one of the primary reasons to conduct panel surveys, but studies have shown that estimates of change from panel surveys can be subject to measurement error, most commonly overreporting of change. For this reason, many panel surveys use a technique called proactive dependent interviewing, which reminds responden...
Article
Full-text available
Offering participants in mobile app studies personalized feedback on the data they report seems an obvious thing to do: Participants might expect an app to provide feedback given their experiences with commercial apps, feedback might motivate more people to participate in the study, and participants might be more motivated to provide accurate data...
Chapter
This chapter summarizes key methodological features and challenges based on experiences with the Understanding Society Innovation Panel, a probability‐based household panel with annual interviews that exists solely for the purposes of experimentation and methodological development. The aim is to raise awareness of unique issues that arise when moun...
Article
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We asked members of the Understanding Society Innovation Panel about their willingness to participate in various data collection tasks on their mobile devices. We find that stated willingness varies considerably depending on the type of activity involved: respondents are less willing to participate in tasks that involve downloading and installing a...
Article
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p>This paper examines non-response in a mobile app study designed to collect expenditure data. We invited 2,383 members of the nationally representative Understanding Society Innovation Panel in Great Britain to download an app to record their spending on goods and services: Participants were asked to scan receipts or report spending directly in th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We review process generated data sources and new technologies that could be used to improve the measurement of household finances. For each of thesewe review what is known about (i) the content of what can be measured, (ii) examples of research for which these data have been used, (iii) whether the data have been used asfree-standing data sources o...
Preprint
Full-text available
As part of a broader project aimed at looking at ways to improve the measurement of financial information in Understanding Society, we are exploring the role that new technologies may play in making it easier for survey participants to provide information on expenditures. We used a spending app developed by Kantar Worldpanel that captures images of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Across the world longitudinal studies are facing falling response rates, at the same time cost imperatives are bringing into question the feasibility of large scale regular face-to-face data collection. While, the rapid development of communications technology and associated cultural changes is assumed to mean that study participants will increasin...
Article
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The work of Smyth, Dillman, Christian, and Stern (2006) and Smyth, Christian, and Dillman (2008) compares “yes/no” questions to “check all that apply” questions. They conclude that the “yes/no” format is preferable as it reflects deeper processing of survey questions. Smyth et al. (2008) found that the “yes/no” format performed similarly across tel...
Article
To measure what determines people’s attitudes, definitions, or decisions, surveys increasingly ask respondents to judge vignettes. A vignette typically describes a hypothetical situation or object as having various attributes (dimensions). In factorial surveys, the values (levels) of dimensions are experimentally varied, so that their impact on res...
Article
Full-text available
There are considerable cost and timeliness advantages associated with web interviewing, compared to interviewer administration. However, web surveys do not perform well in terms of coverage and participation. To harness the strengths of both modes, existing probability-based interviewer-administered surveys are therefore being pushed to consider a...
Article
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With proactive dependent interviewing (PDI) respondents are reminded of the answer they gave in the previous interview, before being asked about their current status. PDI is used in panel surveys to assist respondent recall and reduce spurious changes in responses over time. PDI may however provide scope for new errors if respondents falsely accept...
Article
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To avoid asking respondents questions that do not apply to them, surveys often use filter questions that determine routing into follow-up items. Filter questions can be asked in an interleafed format, in which follow-up questions are asked immediately after each relevant filter, or in a grouped format, in which follow-up questions are asked only af...
Article
Full-text available
Household income is difficult to measure, since it requires the collection of information about all potential income sources for each member of a household.Weassess the effects of two types of edit check questions on measurement error and survey estimates: within-wave edit checks use responses to questions earlier in the same interview to query app...
Article
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This paper examines the role of interviewers’ experience, attitudes, personality traits and interpersonal skills in determining survey co-operation, conditional on contact. We take the perspective that these characteristics influence interviewers’ behaviour and hence influence the doorstep interaction between interviewer and sample member. Previous...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents some preliminary findings from the Wave 4 Innovation Panel (IP4) of Understanding Society: The UK Household Longitudinal Study. Understanding Society is a major new panel survey for the UK. In March 2011, the fourth wave of the Innovation Panel was fielded. This paper describes the design of IP4, the experiments carried and the...
Article
We assess measurement error in panel survey reports of social security benefit receipt, drawing on a unique validation study. Our aims are threefold. First, we quantify the incidence of measurement errors (under-and over-reporting). Second, we assess the extent to which this varies according to the questioning method that is used. Specifically, dep...
Chapter
This chapter reviews the use of auxiliary data in studies of cross-national variations in the above factors and the impacts upon survey nonresponse. It discusses expected sources of cross-national differences in survey participation processes. Then, the chapter classifies potential sources of auxiliary data, focusing on contact data. It reviews exi...
Article
This paper discusses the challenges in assessing the effects of mixed modes on measurement. We briefly review theories about why different modes of data collection can lead to differences in survey responses and statistical methods typically used to assess mode effects. We then discuss the challenges, including which mode effects are identified, ho...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the role of interviewers' experience, attitudes, personality traits and inter-personal skills in determining survey co-operation. We take the perspective that these characteristics influence interviewers' behaviour and hence influence the doorstep interaction between interviewer and sample member. Previous studies of the associa...
Chapter
Panel surveys increasingly use dependent interviewing, where substantive answers from previous interviews are fed forward and used to tailor the wording and routing of questions or to include in-interview edit checks. The main reason for adopting dependent interviewing varies across survey organisations, surveys and items. As a result, a variety of...
Article
Full-text available
Linkage of household survey responses with administrative data is increasingly on the agenda. Unique individual identifiers have clear benefits for making linkages but are also subject to problems of survey item non-response and measurement error. Our experimental study that linked survey responses to UK government agency records on benefits and ta...
Article
Full-text available
Respondent incentives are increasingly used as a measure of combating falling response rates and resulting risks of nonresponse bias. Nonresponse in panel surveys is particularly problematic, since even low wave-on-wave nonresponse rates can lead to substantial cumulative losses; if nonresponse is differential, this may lead to increasing bias acro...
Article
Full-text available
Dependent interviewing techniques, where substantive information from previous interviews is fed forward and used in the formulation of questions or to prompt post-response edit checks, are increasingly employed by panel surveys. While there is substantial evidence that dependent interviewing improves the quality of longitudinal data, claims of imp...
Article
Full-text available
This paper showcases ways in which contact data can provide useful auxiliary information to study non-response and devise new strategies for statistical adjustment and fieldwork specification in cross-national surveys. We propose a typology of the processes generating contact data and discuss their implications for the utility for methodological re...
Article
Full-text available
Respondent incentives are increasingly used as a measure of combating falling response rates and resulting risks of nonresponse bias. Nonresponse in panel surveys is particularly problematic, since even low wave-on-wave nonresponse rates can lead to substantial cumulative losses, and if nonresponse is differential, may lead to increasing bias acros...
Article
Full-text available
This paper documents the introduction of dependent interviewing in wave 16 of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). Dependent interviewing is a method of designing questions on longitudinal surveys where substantive information, available to the survey organisation prior to the interview, is used to tailor the wording and routing of questions...
Article
We analyse patterns of consent and consent bias in the context of a large general household survey, the 'Improving survey measurement of income and employment' survey, also addressing issues that arise when there are multiple consent questions. A multivariate probit regression model for four binary outcomes with two incidental truncations is used....
Article
Using panel data on micro enterprises from Peru we find evidence suggesting that firm dynamics explain "formality," where formality is recast as the firm's decision to participate in societal institutions. The results suggest that differences in unobservable factors, such as entrepreneurial ability, contribute largely to differences in growth rates...
Article
Full-text available
We identify the causes of mode effects in comparisons of face-to-face and telephone surveys, by testing for differences in the extent of satisficing and social desirability bias due to differences in the stimulus (visual vs. aural presentation of response options) and the presence vs. absence of the interviewer. The stimulus did not lead to differe...
Article
Full-text available
Panel surveys increasingly use dependent interviewing, where substantive answers from previous interviews are fed forward and used to tailor the wording and routing of questions or to include in-interview edit checks. The main reason for adopting dependent interviewing varies across survey organisations, surveys and items. As a result, a variety of...
Article
Full-text available
This report presents findings from an experimental study carried out in the context of the European Social Survey, to assess the impact a change in data collection mode from the current face-to-face interviewing to telephone might have on data quality and to study the likely causes of any observed mode effects. Evidence from previous studies sugges...
Article
Full-text available
Using an experimental design, we compare two alternative approaches to dependent interviewing (proactive and reactive) with traditional independent interviewing on a module of questions about sources of income. We believe this to be the first large-scale quantitative comparison of proactive and reactive dependent interviewing. The three approaches...
Article
Full-text available
Linkages of household survey responses with administrative data may be based on unique individual identifiers or on survey respondent characteristics. The benefits gained from using unique identifiers need to be assessed in the light of potential problems such as non-response and measurement error. We report on a study that linked survey responses...
Article
Full-text available
This article is concerned with measurement error in panel survey reports of social security benefit receipt. Our aims are two-fold. First, we attempt to quantify the extent of measurement error and to identify its correlates. Second, we assess the extent to which this varies according to the questioning method used. Specifically, dependent intervie...
Article
Full-text available
Dependent interviewing techniques, where substantive information from previous interviews is fed forward and used in the formulation of questions or to prompt post-response edit checks, are increasingly employed by panel surveys. While there is substantial evidence that dependent interviewing improves the quality of longitudinal data, claims of imp...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a review of methodological research regarding issues that are pertinent to surveys involving longitudinal data collection, i.e. repeated measurement over time on the same units. The objective of the review is to identify important gaps in our knowledge of issues affecting the design and implementation of such surveys and the use...
Article
Full-text available
This report derives from the project ?Improving survey measurement of income and employment (ISMIE)? which investigates measurement error in survey data on income and employment, using a UK sub-sample of the European Household Community Panel (ECHP). In this paper we describe the process of collecting validation data and the outcomes of the process...
Article
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23 January 2004 -WORK IN PROGRESS! -Acknowledgements This paper derives from a project on 'Improving survey measures of income and employment (ISMIE)', funded by the ESRC Research Methods Programme. We also benefit from ISER's core funding from the ESRC and the University of Essex. We are grateful to our ISER colleagues, especially, for their assis...
Article
Full-text available
Dependent interviewing has been introduced by a number of panel surveys as a means of reducing measurement error, in particular the typically observed concentration of transitions at the seam between waves, the 'seam effect'. Little evidence exists, however, of the effects on survey estimates. We report on a large scale randomised experiment compar...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the price evolution of houses on the basis of average sales prices, as is current practice in Belgium, might be misleading due to changing characteristics of the houses sold in the periods observed. A hedonic index which takes into account changes in characteristics is more appropriate. We use the budget surveys of the Belgian Statistical...
Article
Using panel data on micro-enterprises from Peru, we find evidence suggesting that firm dynamics explain 'formality', i.e. the decision to participate in societal institutions. In particular, we find that participation increases with firm size and age, implying transition of firms to formality as they grow. The distinct characteristics of sub-groups...