Anne Lazenbatt

Health Psychology

BSc MSc PhD
24.08

Publications

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    L. Dunne · A. Thurston · A. Gildea · F. Kee · A. Lazenbatt
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a research protocol for a randomised controlled efficacy trial of the ‘Dead Cool’ smoking prevention programme. Dead Cool is a three to four-hour programme designed to be used by teachers with Year 9 students in Northern Ireland. The main outcome of the programme is to prevent students from starting to smoke. The protocol reports a research design intended to test the efficacy of the programme in 20 post-primary school settings. Selected schools included those from secondary /grammar/integrated/single sex/coeducational, rural and urban schools from both the maintained and controlled state sector and independent sector schools. Outcome measures include self-reported behaviours, monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) in exhaled breath and focus groups designed to assess implementation fidelity and opinions on efficacy in intervention schools and explore the ‘counterfactual’ potential treatments in control schools.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2016 · International Journal of Educational Research
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    ABSTRACT: The paper presents a protocol for ‘A randomized controlled trial of functional family therapy (FFT): an Early Intervention Foundation (EIF) partnership between Croydon Council and Queen's University Belfast’. The protocol describes a trial that uses FFT as an alternative intervention to current use of the youth justice system and local authority care with the aim of reducing crime/recidivism in young people referred to Croydon Council. The trial will take place over a period of 36 months and will involve up to 154 families. Croydon Council will employ a team of five Functional Family Therapists who will work with families to promote effective outcomes. The Centre for Effective Education at Queen's University Belfast will act as independent evaluators of outcomes for families and young people. The work is supported from the United Kingdom Economic & Social Research Council/Early Intervention Foundation Grant Number ES/M006921/1
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · International Journal of Educational Research
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Domestic abuse is a significant public health issue. It occurs more frequently among disabled women than those without a disability and evidence suggests that a great deal of domestic abuse begins or worsens during pregnancy. All women and their infants are entitled to equal access to high quality maternity care. However, research has shown that disabled women who experience domestic abuse face numerous barriers to accessing care. The aim of the study was to identify the priority areas for improving access to maternity services for this group of women; develop strategies for improved access and utilisation; and explore the feasibility of implementing the identified strategies. Methods: This multi-method study was the third and final part of a larger study conducted in the UK between 2012 and 2014. The study used a modified concept mapping approach and was theoretically underpinned by Andersen's model of healthcare use. Seven focus group interviews were conducted with a range of maternity care professionals (n = 45), incorporating quantitative and qualitative components. Participants ranked perceived barriers to women's access and utilisation of maternity services in order of priority using a 5-point Likert scale. Quantitative data exploration used descriptive and non-parametric analyses. In the qualitative component of each focus group, participants discussed the barriers and identified potential improvement strategies (and feasibility of implementing these). Qualitative data were analysed inductively using a framework analysis approach. Results: The three most highly ranked barriers to women's access and utilisation of maternity services identified in the quantitative component were: 1) staff being unaware and not asking about domestic abuse and disability; 2) the impact of domestic abuse on women; 3) women's fear of disclosure. The top two priority strategies were: providing information about domestic abuse to all women and promoting non-judgemental staff attitude. These were also considered very feasible. The qualitative analysis identified a range of psychosocial and environmental barriers experienced by this group of women in accessing maternity care. Congruent with the quantitative results, the main themes were lack of awareness and fear of disclosure. Key strategies were identified as demystifying disclosure and creating physical spaces to facilitate disclosure. Conclusions: The study supports findings of previous research regarding the barriers that women face in accessing and utilising maternity services, particularly regarding the issue of disclosure. But the study provides new evidence on the perceived importance and feasibility of strategies to address such barriers. This is an important step in ensuring practice-based acceptability and ease with which improvement strategies might be implemented in maternity care settings.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
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    ABSTRACT: Women and their babies are entitled to equal access to high quality maternity care. However, when women fit into two or more categories of vulnerability they can face multiple, compound barriers to accessing and utilising services. Disabled women are up to three times more likely to experience domestic abuse than non-disabled women. Domestic abuse may compromise health service access and utilisation and disabled people in general have suboptimal access to healthcare services. Despite this, little is known about the compounding effects of disability and domestic abuse on women's access to maternity care. The aim of the study was to identify how women approach maternity care services, their expectations of services and whether they are able to get the type of care that they need and want. We conducted a qualitative, Critical Incident Technique study in Scotland. Theoretically we drew on Andersen's model of healthcare use. The model was congruent with our interest in women's intended/actual use of maternity services and the facilitators and barriers impacting their access to care. Data were generated during 2013 using one-to-one interviews. Five women took part and collectively reported 45 critical incidents relating to accessing and utilising maternity services. Mapped to the underpinning theoretical framework, our findings show how the four domains of attitudes; knowledge; social norms; and perceived control are important factors shaping maternity care experiences. Positive staff attitude and empowering women to have control over their own care is crucial in influencing women's access to and utilisation of maternity healthcare services. Moreover these are cyclical, with the consequences and outcomes of healthcare use becoming part of the enabling or disabling factors affecting future healthcare decisions.Further consideration needs to be given to the development of strategies to access and recruit women in these circumstances. This will provide an opportunity for under-represented and silenced voices to be heard.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
  • Anne Lazenbatt · Lisa Bunting · John Devaney Davy Hayes
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    ABSTRACT: Co-Sleeping and bed sharing are considered the social norm for approximately 90% of the world's population, with two-thirds of the world's cultures habitually practicing mother-infant co-sleeping on the same bed. Although international studies show that the practice of co-sleeping is common, it is controversial in the public health community, as many consider it a significant risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), accounting for 50% of SIDS deaths in the UK. The report offers an international review of the evidence and provides important debates and critical knowledge for both health professionals, parents and all those organisations working to support the safety of infants in their first perinatal year.
    No preview · Technical Report · Sep 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The manifesto Start Well, Live Better by the UK Faculty of Public Health (Start Well, Live Better-A Manifesto for the Public's Health. London: UK Faculty of Public Health, 2014) sets out 12 compelling priorities for the protection of people's health. The focus of this document is preventative, calling for a comprehensive strategy to target a wide-ranging set of challenges to public health; however, it fails to mention child maltreatment and its negative impact on long-term health outcomes. In this article, we explore the long-term negative consequences of child maltreatment and how these can be conceptually aligned with four different characteristics of long-term health conditions. We suggest that situating child maltreatment within a long-term conditions framework could have significant advantages and implications for practice, policy and research, by strengthening a commitment across disciplines to apply evidence-based principles linked with policy and evaluation and recognizing the chronic effects of maltreatment to concentrate public, professional and government awareness of the extent and impact of the issue. We argue that a public health approach is the most effective way of focusing preventative efforts on the long-term sequelae of child maltreatment and to foster cooperation in promoting children's rights to grow and develop in a safe and caring environment free from violence and abuse. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Public Health
  • John Pinkerton · Lisa Bunting · Davy Hayes · Anne Lazenbatt
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    ABSTRACT: Reflecting on what is known in the emerging field of CSE, attention is drawn in the report to the risks associated with childhood adversities and poor parenting and their impact.
    No preview · Technical Report · Aug 2015
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    Lisa Bunting · Anne Lazenbatt
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    ABSTRACT: Although the impact of multiple adverse events in childhood is well known, it is equally accepted that the variation in individual trajectories and outcomes is significant. Resilience focuses on positive adaption in the face of adversity, offering a counterbalance to deficit-based research and risk averse, procedurally driven practice. Positive relationships and secure attachments are widely considered to be the cornerstone of resilience, yet, within social work practice, there is a tendency to consider attachment only in relation to children and adults. Three biographical narratives are used to explore resilience and attachment through a narrative identity framework, exploring parents' experiences of multiple adversities over their lifespan, their close relationships, and their experiences of child welfare interventions. It argues for the importance of narrative in social work assessment, particularly in relation to families with complex needs, illustrating how this enables a richer, more nuanced understanding of mothers and fathers as individuals in their own right, and provides insight into how alternative narratives might be better supported and developed.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Qualitative Social Work
  • Anne Lazenbatt
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    ABSTRACT: Although the impact of multiple adverse events in childhood is well known, it is equally accepted that the variation in individual trajectories and outcomes is significant. Resilience focuses on positive adaption in the face of adversity, offering a counterbalance to deficit-based research and risk averse, procedurally driven practice. Positive relationships and secure attachments are widely considered to be the cornerstone of resilience, yet, within social work practice, there is a tendency to consider attachment only in relation to children and adults. Three biographical narratives are used to explore resilience and attachment through a narrative identity framework, exploring parents’ experiences of multiple adversities over their lifespan their close relationships, and their experiences of child welfare interventions. It argues for the importance of narrative in social work assessment, particularly in relation to families with complex needs, illustrating how this enables a richer, more nuanced understanding of mothers and fathers as individuals in their own right and provides insight into how alternative narratives might be better supported and developed.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Qualitative Social Work
  • Julie Taylor · Anne Lazenbatt

    No preview · Book · Oct 2014
  • Anne Lazenbatt
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    ABSTRACT: This book also aims to increase our understanding of how we identify these risks to children and families before it is too late; to assess the impacts of these risks upon children and families; to highlight the learning we have gained from evidence based practice and research; and to view the current landscape of service delivery in relation to child abuse within ‘high risk families’. There are overwhelming moral, ethical, economic and ecological reasons why this topic should be of paramount concern. The scale of the problem alone suggests that families living in high risk situations that lead to child maltreatment are displaying significant issues within all four countries of the UK1. The costs, both direct [e.g. medical care] and indirect [e.g. criminal justice] of addressing these consequences are enormous(Browne et al. 2007). In Europe only the UK has attempted to calculate the total economic burden of maltreatment. In 1996 this was estimated at £735 million(National Commission of Inquiry into the Prevention of Child Abuse 1996).
    No preview · Book · Oct 2014
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    Smith · Allardyce · Hackett · Bradbury-Jones · Lazenbatt · Taylor
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    ABSTRACT: This article considers the trajectory and effectiveness of policy, procedures and practice in the UK since the early 1990s in responding to young people who display problematic and harmful sexual behaviours. It draws on data from three publications in which research, policy and practice in the last 20 years have been reviewed. Key themes raised by Masson and Hackett are revisited including: denial and minimisation; terminology and categorisation; similarities with other young offenders; the child protection and youth justice systems; and assessment and interventions. The authors find that there is improvement in recognition of, and practice in response to, this group of young people, but good practice standards are inconsistently applied. With devolution of political powers, Scotland and Northern Ireland are now embarking on a more strategic response than England. The absence of a public debate and prioritising of primary prevention of child sexual abuse is noted.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Journal of Sexual Aggression
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    ABSTRACT: Background Although disabled women are significantly more likely to experience domestic abuse during pregnancy than non-disabled women, very little is known about how maternity care access and utilisation is affected by the co-existence of disability and domestic abuse. This systematic review of the literature explored how domestic abuse impacts upon disabled women’s access to maternity services. Methods Eleven articles were identified through a search of six electronic databases and data were analysed to identify: the factors that facilitate or compromise access to care; the consequences of inadequate care for pregnant women’s health and wellbeing; and the effectiveness of existing strategies for improvement. Results Findings indicate that a mental health diagnosis, poor relationships with health professionals and environmental barriers can compromise women’s utilisation of maternity services. Domestic abuse can both compromise, and catalyse, access to services and social support is a positive factor when accessing care. Delayed and inadequate care has adverse effects on women’s physical and psychological health, however further research is required to fully explore the nature and extent of these consequences. Only one study identified strategies currently being used to improve access to services for disabled women experiencing abuse. Conclusions Based upon the barriers and facilitators identified within the review, we suggest that future strategies for improvement should focus on: understanding women’s reasons for accessing care; fostering positive relationships; being women-centred; promoting environmental accessibility; and improving the strength of the evidence base.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
  • Anne Lazenbatt ·  Devaney · J. Bunting · Davidson · Hayes · Lazenbatt · A. Spratt
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    ABSTRACT: Suicide is a multi-faceted phenomenon involving the interaction between biological, psychological, sociological, environmental and cultural factors. Suicide in adolescents has been identified as a serious public health problem worldwide. However, although adolescent suicide remains a well-researched area it still remains a poorly understood phenomenon. There has been some research which considers self-harm and suicide among children and young people in Northern Ireland but there are major gaps in the available knowledge and research on how children and young people are positioned in relation to self-harm and suicide. Prevention of suicidal behaviour is often difficult, and poses a major challenge given the relative rarity of the event. Effective prevention therefore requires sound knowledge of the key risk factors with the main target of effective prevention of youth suicides being to reduce suicide risk factors with one of the most significant being the exposure to and experience of adversity in childhood.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Aug 2013
  • Anne Lazenbatt ·  Smith · C. Allardyce · Bradbury-Jones · Lazenbatt · Taylor

    No preview · Conference Paper · Jul 2013
  • Anne Lazenbatt · Julie Taylor

    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Child Care in Practice
  • Anne Lazenbatt · Lisa Bunting

    No preview · Conference Paper · Apr 2013
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    Anne Lazenbatt · John Devaney · Aideen Gildea
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    ABSTRACT: Although domestic violence is seen as a serious public health issue for women worldwide, international evidence suggests that women aged over 50 who are victims are suffering in silence because the problem is often ignored by health professionals. More U.K. research is needed to identify the extent of the problem, and services to meet the needs of older women. This study aims to bridge this gap by gaining a deeper understanding of how 'older women' cope with domestic violence and how it affects their wellbeing. Eighteen older women who were currently, or had been in an abusive relationship were recruited. Semi-structured interview schedules were used to discuss the personal nature of DV and its effects on wellbeing, ways of coping and sources of support. Findings suggest that living in a domestically violent context has extremely negative effects on older women's wellbeing leading to severe anxiety and depression. Three-quarters of the women defined themselves as in 'very poor' mental and physical health and were using pathogenic coping mechanisms, such as excessive and long-term use of alcohol, prescription and non-prescription drugs and cigarettes. This negative coping increased the likelihood of these women experiencing addiction to drugs and alcohol dependence and endangered their health in the longer term. Our findings suggest that health professionals must receive appropriate education to gain knowledge and skills in order to deal effectively and support older women experiencing domestic violence.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association
  • Anne Lazenbatt

    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Evidence-based nursing

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