Anne K. Scharf

Anne K. Scharf
Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Radolfzell, Germany · Department of Migration

PhD

About

42
Publications
17,203
Reads
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1,321
Citations
Citations since 2017
26 Research Items
1089 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Additional affiliations
June 2019 - present
Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior (formerly known as MPI for Ornithology, Radolfzell), Radolfzell, Germany
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2017 - June 2019
Max-Planck-Institut für Ornithologie, Teilinstitut Radolfzell
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2012 - December 2016
Max-Planck-Institut für Ornithologie, Teilinstitut Radolfzell
Position
  • PhD
Education
October 2009 - October 2010
Universidad Pablo de Olavide
Field of study
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
August 2006 - June 2007
September 2001 - December 2008
University of Granada
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Background Bio-logging and animal tracking datasets continuously grow in volume and complexity, documenting animal behaviour and ecology in unprecedented extent and detail, but greatly increasing the challenge of extracting knowledge from the data obtained. A large variety of analysis methods are being developed, many of which in effect are inacces...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Bio-logging and animal tracking datasets continuously grow in volume and complexity, documenting animal behaviour and ecology in unprecedented extent and detail, but greatly increasing the challenge of extracting knowledge from the data obtained. A large variety of analysis methods are being developed, many of which in effect are inacces...
Article
Quantifying movement and demographic events of free‐ranging animals is fundamental to studying their ecology, evolution and conservation. Technological advances have led to an explosion in sensor‐based methods for remotely observing these phenomena. This transition to big data creates new challenges for data management, analysis and collaboration....
Article
Full-text available
Background Globally, arid regions are expanding and becoming hotter and drier with climate change. For medium and large bodied endotherms in the arid zone, the necessity to dissipate heat drives a range of adaptations, from behaviour to anatomy and physiology. Understanding how apex predators negotiate these landscapes and how they balance their en...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Movement is the major contributor to active energy expenditure in most vertebrates and it is regularly characterised by body acceleration that can be captured by animal-attached accelerometers (ACC). Overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) is a metric derived from ACC data, which can be used as a proxy for energy expenditure over fine t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Animal tracking data are being collected more frequently, in greater detail, and on smaller taxa than ever before. These data hold the promise to increase the relevance of animal movement for understanding ecological processes, but this potential will only be fully realized if their accompanying location error is properly addressed. Historically, c...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric conditions impact how animals use the aerosphere, and birds and bats should modify their flight to minimise energetic expenditure relative to changing wind conditions. To investigate how free-ranging straw-coloured fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) fly with changing wind support, we use data collected from bats fit with GPS loggers and an int...
Article
Full-text available
Background Increases in landscape connectivity can improve a species’ ability to cope with habitat fragmentation and degradation. Wildlife corridors increase landscape connectivity and it is therefore important to identify and maintain them. Currently, corridors are mostly identified using methods that rely on generic habitat suitability measures....
Article
Full-text available
Aim Large carnivore populations in Europe are expanding into new areas. This generates opportunities to improve their conservation status, but also creates a need to address new conflicts with humans. Species management units are constrained by administrative boundaries, but effective conservation and conflict management require a continental‐scale...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we modelled the potential range shifts of tiger (Panthera tigris) populations over the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, to provide new insights into the evolutionary history and interconnectivity between populations of this endangered species. Asia. We used an ecological niche approach and applied a maximum entropy (Maxent) framework...
Article
Full-text available
On-going fragmentation of tropical forest ecosystems and associated depletion of seed dispersers threatens the long-term survival of animal-dispersed plants. These threats do not only affect biodiversity and species abundance, but ultimately ecosystem functions and services. Thus, seed dispersers such as the straw-coloured fruit bat, E. helvum, whi...
Article
Full-text available
1. Wildlife damage to human property threatens human–wildlife coexistence. Conflicts arising from wildlife damage in intensively managed landscapes often undermine conservation efforts, making damage mitigation and compensation of special concern for wildlife conservation. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of damage and claims at la...
Article
Full-text available
Investigating animal energy expenditure across space and time may provide more detailed insight into how animals interact with their environment. This insight should improve our understanding of how changes in the environment affect animal energy budgets and is particularly relevant for animals living near or within human altered environments where...
Article
Full-text available
Although significantly more money is spent on the conservation of tigers than on any other threatened species, today only 3200 to 3600 tigers roam the forests of Asia, occupying only 7% of their historical range. Despite the global significance of and interest in tiger conservation, global approaches to plan tiger recovery are partly impeded by the...
Article
Responses of biodiversity to changes in both land cover and climate are recognized [ 1 ] but still poorly understood [ 2 ]. This poses significant challenges for spatial planning as species could shift, contract, expand, or maintain their range inside or outside protected areas [ 2–4 ]. We examine this problem in Borneo, a global biodiversity hotsp...
Article
Advancement in ecological methods predicting species distributions is a crucial precondition for deriving sound management actions. Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) models are a popular tool to predict species distributions, as they are considered able to cope well with sparse, irregularly sampled data and minor location errors. Although a fundamental assu...
Article
Full-text available
Flying foxes (Pteropodidae) are key seed dispersers on the African continent, yet their migratory behavior is largely unknown. Here, we studied the movement ecology of the straw-colored fruit bat, Eidolon helvum, and other fruit bats by analyzing stable isotope ratios in fur collected from museum specimens. In a triple-isotope approach based on sam...
Data
Reference numbers of the sampled specimens at the National Museum for Natural History in Paris (MNHN) and the Natural History Museum in Berlin (MFN) and the corresponding stable isotope ratios for carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and hydrogen (δ2HK). Abbreviations for countries are: ZIM = Zimbabwe. DRC = Democratic Republic of Congo. GHA = Ghana. CAM...
Data
Location of collection sites for each of the seven flying fox species. The African continent is coloured in relation the annual average stable hydrogen isotope ratio of precipitation water according to [31]. The distribution range of flying foxes is marked as a shaded area. (TIF)

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