Anne Pisor

Anne Pisor
Washington State University | WSU · Department of Anthropology

PhD Anthropology; MA Applied Statistics

About

54
Publications
7,391
Reads
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733
Citations
Introduction
I study human sociality, from its evolution to its instantiations in the 21st century. I focus primarily on social relationships that span distance, combining basic science with applied research to investigate how long-distance ties impact resource management and responses to climate change. With students and collaborators, I also study cooperative breeding, moral psychology, and identity markers. Also likes: singing, scuba, running, biking.
Education
August 2016 - July 2018
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Anthropology
April 2013 - June 2016
University of California, Santa Barbara
Field of study
  • Anthropology
September 2009 - June 2012
University of California, Santa Barbara
Field of study
  • Applied Statistics

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Full-text available
Primate individuals use a variety of strategies in intergroup encounters, from aggression to tolerance; however, recent focus on the evolution of either warfare or peace has come at the cost of characterizing this variability. We identify evolutionary advantages that may incentivize tolerance toward extra‐group individuals in humans and nonhuman pr...
Article
Full-text available
As economic games have spread from experimental economics to other social sciences, so too have critiques of their usefulness for drawing inferences about the 'real world'. What these criticisms often miss is that games can be used to reveal individuals' private preferences in ways that observational and interview data cannot; furthermore, economic...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Despite our focus on adaptation and human responses to climate, evolutionary and biological anthropologists (EBAs) are largely absent from conversations about contemporary “climate‐change adaptation,” a term popular in other disciplines, the development world, and related policy decisions. EBAs are missing a big opportunity to contribute...
Preprint
While intergroup relationships (IRs) dominate the literature on human sociality, long-distance relationships (LDRs) are also highly prevalent in human social life; however, they are often conflated with IRs or overlooked entirely. We suggest that by focusing on IRs to the exclusion of LDRs, scholars are painting an incomplete picture of human socia...
Article
Full-text available
Communities want to determine their own climate change adaptation strategies, and scientists and decision-makers should listen to them — both the equity and efficacy of climate change adaptation depend on it. We outline key lessons researchers and development actors can take to support communities and learn from them.
Preprint
Objectives With our diverse training, theoretical and empirical toolkits, and rich data, evolutionary and biological anthropologists (EBAs) have much to contribute to research and policy decisions about climate change and other pressing social issues. However, we remain largely absent from these critical, ongoing efforts. Here, we draw on the liter...
Article
Objectives With our diverse training, theoretical and empirical toolkits, and rich data, evolutionary and biological anthropologists (EBAs) have much to contribute to research and policy decisions about climate change and other pressing social issues. However, we remain largely absent from these critical, ongoing efforts. Here, we draw on the liter...
Preprint
Parochial altruism, or in-group favoritism at out-group expense, is popularly believed to be a universal in humans—something that characterizes all societies. However, the empirical literature points to considerable variability in the expression of parochial preferences. We argue that greater emphasis should be placed on understanding this variatio...
Preprint
The idea of adaptation, in which an organism or population becomes better suited to its environment, is used in a variety of disciplines. Originating in evolutionary biology, adaptation has been a central theme in biological anthropology and human ecology. More recently, the study of adaptation in the context of climate change has become an importa...
Article
Full-text available
The idea of adaptation, in which an organism or population becomes better suited to its environment, is used in a variety of disciplines. Originating in evolutionary biology, adaptation has been a central theme in biological anthropology and human ecology. More recently, the study of adaptation in the context of climate change has become an importa...
Preprint
Objectives Despite our focus on adaptation and human responses to climate, evolutionary and biological anthropologists (EBAs) are largely absent from conversations about contemporary “climate‐change adaptation,” a term popular in other disciplines, the development world, and related policy decisions. EBAs are missing a big opportunity to contribute...
Preprint
OBJECTIVES. Long-distance social relationships have been a feature of human evolutionary history; evidence from the paleoanthropological, archaeological, and ethnographic records suggest that one function of these relationships is to manage the risk of resource shortfalls due to climate variability. We should expect long-distance relationships to b...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Long‐distance social relationships have been a feature of human evolutionary history; evidence from the paleoanthropological, archeological, and ethnographic records suggest that one function of these relationships is to manage the risk of resource shortfalls due to climate variability. We should expect long‐distance relationships to be...
Article
Full-text available
The intensifying pace of research based on cross-cultural studies in the social sciences necessitates a discussion of the unique challenges of multi-sited research. Given an increasing demand for social scientists to expand their data collection beyond WEIRD (Western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic) populations, there is an urgent ne...
Article
Decades of research conducted in Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, & Democratic (WEIRD) societies have led many scholars to conclude that the use of mental states in moral judgment is a human cognitive universal, perhaps an adaptive strategy for selecting optimal social partners from a large pool of candidates. However, recent work from a mo...
Preprint
Full-text available
The intensifying pace of research based on cross-cultural studies in the social sciences necessitates a discussion of the unique challenges of multi-sited research. Given an increasing demand for social scientists to expand their data collection beyond WEIRD (western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic) populations, there is an urgent n...
Preprint
Full-text available
In social-living animals, interactions between groups are frequently agonistic, but they can also be tolerant and even cooperative. Intergroup tolerance and cooperation are regarded as a crucial step in the formation of highly structured multilevel societies. Behavioral ecological theory suggests that intergroup tolerance and cooperation can emerge...
Article
Full-text available
In social-living animals, interactions between groups are frequently agonistic, but they can also be tolerant and even cooperative. Intergroup tolerance and cooperation are regarded as a crucial step in the formation of highly structured multilevel societies. Behavioral ecological theory suggests that intergroup tolerance and cooperation can emerge...
Preprint
As economic games have spread from experimental economics to other social sciences, so too have critiques of their usefulness for drawing inferences about the “real world.” What these criticisms often miss is that games can be used to reveal individuals’ private preferences in ways that observational and interview data cannot; further, economic gam...
Preprint
Primate individuals use a variety of strategies in intergroup encounters, from aggression to tolerance; however, recent focus on the evolution of either warfare or peace has come at the cost of characterizing this variability. We identify evolutionary advantages that may incentivize tolerance toward extra-group individuals in humans and non-human p...
Preprint
Primate individuals use a variety of strategies in intergroup encounters, from aggression to tolerance; however, recent focus on the evolution of either warfare or peace has come at the cost of characterizing this variability. We identify evolutionary advantages that may incentivize tolerance toward extra-group individuals in humans and non-human p...
Preprint
Full-text available
We argue that classic economic games and their more recent extensions should continue to play a role in fieldworkers’ methodological toolkits. Economic games are not replacements for observational and self-report studies of behavior, but rather complements to them: While observational and self-report data measure individuals’ behavior subject to th...
Preprint
We argue that classic economic games and their more recent extensions should continue to play a role in fieldworkers’ methodological toolkits. Economic games are not replacements for observational and self-report studies of behavior, but rather complements to them: While observational and self-report data measure individuals’ behavior subject to th...
Preprint
Primate individuals use a variety of strategies in intergroup encounters, from aggression to tolerance; however, recent focus on the evolution of either warfare or peace has come at the cost of characterizing this variability. We identify evolutionary advantages that may incentivize tolerance toward extra-group individuals in humans and non-human p...
Preprint
Full-text available
Primate individuals use a variety of strategies in intergroup encounters, from aggression to tolerance; however, recent focus on the evolution of either warfare or peace has come at the cost of characterizing this variability. Drawing on insights from across the Primate order, with special focus on our closest living relatives, we identify candidat...
Article
Full-text available
Does moral culture contribute to the evolution of cooperation? Here, we examine individuals' and communities' models of what it means to be good and bad and how they correspond to corollary behavior across a variety of socioecological contexts. Our sample includes over 600 people from eight different field sites that include foragers, horticultural...
Preprint
Full-text available
Primate individuals use a variety of strategies in intergroup encounters, from aggression to tolerance; however, despite the prevalence of tolerance in humans, recent focus on the evolution of intergroup contest has come at the cost of characterizing the role of tolerance in human sociality. Can we use the selection pressures hypothesized to favor...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence from the ethnographic and archaeological records reveals that humans often rely on out-group relationships for access to non-local resources and resource buffering. However, little is known about how actors choose out-group cooperative partners. The existing literature suggests that (in-group) partner choice is based on characteristics ass...
Article
Full-text available
To benefit from information provided by others, people must be somewhat credulous. However, credulity entails risks. The optimal level of credulity depends on the relative costs of believing misinformation versus failing to attend to accurate information. When information concerns hazards, erroneous incredulity is often more costly than erroneous c...
Article
Full-text available
Unlike other primates, humans exhibit extensive inter-group tolerance and frequently build relationships with out-group members. Despite its common occurrence, little is known about the conditions leading to out-group relationship building in humans. What are the social and ecological factors promoting valuation of out-group members as potential so...
Article
Full-text available
Intent and mitigating circumstances play a central role in moral and legal assessments in large-scale industrialized societies. Although these features of moral assessment are widely assumed to be universal, to date, they have only been studied in a narrow range of societies. We show that there is substantial cross-cultural variation among eight tr...
Article
Full-text available
Our paper [1] compared two competing hypotheses. The hypothesis that we label universalistic moral evaluation holds that a definitional feature of reasoning about moral rules is that, ceteris paribus, judgements of violations of rules concerning harm, rights or justice will be insensitive to spatial or temporal distance or the opinions of authority...
Article
Full-text available
The decision to engage in corruption-public and private corruption, nepotism, and embezzlement-is often attributed to rational actors maximizing benefits to themselves. However, the importance of reciprocal relationships in humans suggests that an actor may weigh the costs of harms of her corrupt behavior to individuals who may generate future bene...
Data
Country-level variables and statistical methods for country-level variables. (DOCX)
Data
ORs for countries below and above the sample median for several country-level variables. (Fig A) Gini coefficient, (Fig B) absence of political rights (i.e. above the median means fewer political rights), (Fig C) perceived corruption prevalence, and (Fig D) religious fractionalization. Analyses use the religious & ethnic heterogeneity subsample. (D...
Data
Odds of finding corruption permissible by primary geographic identity for the religious-ethnic heterogeneity subset1,2,3. (DOCX)
Data
ORs for regional, country, and continent/world identities vs. local identities across models with country-level variables. Either fractionalization or polarization were used as measures of religious and ethnic heterogeneity. For Ethnic & Religious Fractionalization and Religious & Ethnic Polarization subsamples, n = 20,521; Religious Fractionalizat...
Data
OR with each additional group membership across models with country-level variables. For the Religious & Ethnic Fractionalization and Religious & Ethnic Polarization subsets, n = 5734; Religious Fractionalization and Religious Polarization subsets, n = 10,874; Ethnic Fractionalization and Ethnic Polarization subsets, n = 8562. (DOCX)
Data
Exploratory analysis regressing having a regional identity (i.e., a binary outcome, where 1 is a regional identity and 0 is a different geographic identity) on participant’s perceptions on whether more emphasis on “family life,” less emphasis on “money and material possessions,” and more emphasis on “greater respect for authority” would be good, ne...
Data
Odds of finding corruption permissible by number of group memberships for the religious-ethnic heterogeneity subset1,2. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Human moral judgement may have evolved to maximize the individual's welfare given parochial culturally constructed moral systems. If so, then moral condemnation should be more severe when transgressions are recent and local, and should be sensitive to the pronouncements of authority figures (who are often arbiters of moral norms), as the fitness pa...
Article
Full-text available
The functions of cultural beliefs are often opaque to those who hold them. Accordingly, to benefit from cultural evolution's ability to solve complex adaptive problems, learners must be credulous. However, credulity entails costs, including susceptibility to exploitation, and effort wasted due to false beliefs. One determinant of the optimal level...
Article
This study explores whether cardiovascular fitness levels and senescent decline are similar in the Tsimane of Bolivia and Canadians, as well as other subsistence and industrialized populations. Among Tsimane, we examine whether morbidity predicts lower levels and faster decline of cardiovascular fitness, or whether their lifestyle (e.g., high physi...
Article
The constituents of attractiveness differ across the sexes. Many relevant traits are dimorphic, suggesting that they are the product of intersexual selection. However, direction of causality is generally difficult to determine, as aesthetic criteria can as readily result from, as cause, dimorphism. Women have proportionately smaller feet than men....
Article
Full-text available
Claims regarding negative strong reciprocity do indeed rest on experiments lacking established external validity, often without even a small "menu of options." Guala's review should prompt strong reciprocity proponents to extend the real-world validity of their work, exploring the preferences participants bring to experiments. That said, Guala's ap...

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