Anne Loison

Anne Loison
Université Savoie Mont Blanc | UdS

Doctor of Philosophy
DR-CNRS

About

155
Publications
45,812
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8,239
Citations
Introduction
Population dynamics; behavioral ecology; evolutionary ecology; plant-herbivore interactions; human-wildlife interactions ; mountain ungulates; animal movement; GPS; biologging; work-life balance of ecology and evolution researchers ; Projects: https://leca.osug.fr/ANR-2017-2010-Mov-it ; https://leca.osug.fr/ANR-2022-2019-HUMANI

Publications

Publications (155)
Article
Animals perceive human activities as risky and generally respond with fear‐induced proactive behaviors, to buffer the circadian patterns of lethal and nonlethal disturbances, such as diel migrations between risky places during safe nighttime and safer places during risky daytime. However, such responses potentially incur costs through movement or r...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the effects of environmental variation on allometric relationships of condition‐dependent traits, especially in wild populations. We estimated sex‐specific static allometry between horn length and body mass in four populations of mountain ungulates that experienced periods of contrasting density over the course of the study. T...
Article
Understanding the consequences of global change for animal movement is a major issue for conservation and management. In particular, habitat fragmentation generates increased densities of linear landscape features that can impede movements. While the influence of these features on animal movements has been intensively investigated, they may also p...
Article
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The time that animals spend travelling at various speeds and the tortuosity of their movement paths are two of the many things that affect space-use by animals. In this, high turn rates are predicted to be energetically costly, especially at high travel speeds, which implies that animals should modulate their speed according to path characteristics...
Article
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Migration of ungulates (hooved mammals) is a fundamental ecological process that promotes abundant herds, whose effects cascade up and down terrestrial food webs. Migratory ungulates provide the prey base that maintains large carnivore and scavenger populations and underpins terrestrial biodiversity (fig. S1). When ungulates move in large aggregati...
Article
Herbivores in quest of food have to attend areas where predators also concentrate their attacks. They have to deal with two conflicting demands, the need of feeding and that of avoiding predation. Using a theoretical approach, we study the influence of these antagonistic constraints on the shaping of an herbivore’s foraging strategy and their conse...
Article
The timing of birth has a predominant influence on both the reproductive success of the mother and the life history trajectory of her offspring. Because early growth and survival are key drivers of population dynamics, there is an urgent need to understand how global change is affecting reproductive phenology and performance. However, identifying w...
Article
Life histories are strongly age dependent, notably linked to the onset of reproductive maturity and subsequent senescence. Consequently, ageing is predicted to impact behaviour, through the expression of either mating tactics in males or neonatal antipredator tactics in females. However, the influence of ageing, and the associated reproductive acti...
Article
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Studying the factors determining the sizes of home ranges, based on bodymass, feeding style, and sociality level, is a long-standing goal at the intersection of ecology and evolution. Yet, how species-specific life history traits interact with different components of the landscape to shape differences in individual home ranges at within-population...
Article
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As nature-based recreational activities keep increasing, so does human pressure on wildlife. Several recent reviews provide a comprehensive overview of the impact of recreation on wildlife, but there is no comprehensive study of how humans perceive their own impact while participating in those activities. We fill this gap by summarizing the current...
Preprint
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Animal movement paths are variously tortuous, with high turn rates predicted to be energetically costly, especially at high speeds. Animals travel most efficiently at the speed that gives the lowest cost of transport (COT), a well-defined point for movement in fluid media. However, theoretically, land animals should travel at their maximum speed to...
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Abstract While all models of sexual selection assume that the development and expression of enlarged secondary sexual traits are costly, males with larger ornaments or weapons generally show greater survival or longevity. These studies have mostly been performed in species with high sexual size dimorphism, subject to intense sexual selection. Here,...
Article
Most habitats are distributed heterogeneously in space, forcing animals to move according to both habitat characteristics and their needs for energy and safety. Animal space use should therefore vary according to habitat characteristics, a process known as the “functional response” in habitat selection. This response has often been tested vis-à-vis...
Article
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Abstract Climate seasonality is a predominant constraint on the lifecycles of species in alpine and polar biomes. Assessing the response of these species to climate change thus requires taking into account seasonal constraints on populations. However, interactions between seasonality, weather fluctuations, and population parameters remain poorly ex...
Article
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How large herbivores track resource quantity and quality through time has formed the core of an abundance of literature on migratory populations in recent decades. Yet, relating foraging processes and habitat selection patterns in resident populations, where spatial heterogeneity of food resources is fine‐grained and/or where the portion of edible...
Article
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Decomposing the life track of an animal into behavioral segments is a fundamental challenge for movement ecology. The proliferation of high‐resolution data, often collected many times per second, offers much opportunity for understanding animal movement. However, the sheer size of modern data sets means there is an increasing need for rapid, novel...
Article
Age at first reproduction is an important determinant of individual variation in reproductive success in ungulates, but few studies have examined its relationship with later fitness‐related traits in males. We used a long‐term individual based study of a harvested moose population to quantify the individual reproductive performance and survival of...
Article
1.When they visit and revisit specific areas, animals may reveal what they need from their home range and how they acquire information. The temporal dimension of such movement recursions, i.e., periodicity, is however rarely studied, yet potentially bears a species, population, or individual‐specific signature. 2.A recent method allows estimating t...
Article
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Trade-offs between fitness-related traits are predicted from the principle of resource allocation, where increased fecundity or parental investment leads to reduced future reproduction or survival. However, fitness traits can also be positively correlated due to individual differences (e.g. body mass). Age at primiparity could potentially explain v...
Article
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When modelling the distribution of animals under current and future conditions, both their response to environmental constraints and their resources’ response to these environmental constraints need to be taken into account. Here, we develop a framework to predict the distribution of large herbivores under global change, while accounting for change...
Article
The cost of current reproduction on survival or future reproduction is one of the most studied trade-offs governing resource distribution between fitness components. Results have often been clouded, however, by the existence of individual heterogeneity, with high-quality individuals able to allocate energy to several functions simultaneously, at no...
Presentation
Full-text available
Modélisation d’un SIG, dans le cadre d’une recherche pluri-disciplinaire s’attachant au suivi des activités récréatives en milieu non-aménagé de montagne. Cette recherche combine des suivis de fréquentation humaine en milieu naturel, ainsi que de mobilités. Ces données spatio-temporelles afin d’être analysées nécessitent un référentiel robuste : un...
Presentation
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Dans un contexte d’étude d’interaction Homme-Faune, des traces GPS de randonneurs ont été collectées. Dans l’objectif d’appréhender une meilleure compréhension de la mobilité humaine en milieu naturel, nous analyserons finement ces données spatio-temporelles. L’algorithme de clustering spatio-temporel ST-DBSCAN est utilisé pour détecter les pauses...
Poster
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Méthodologie permettant l’obtention de types d’itinéraires de randonneurs, à partir de données de GPS (IgotU GT-120) distribués lors de deux étés successifs (2014 et 2015) dans le Parc Naturel Régional du Massif des Bauges. Ces méthodes s’inscrivent à plus long terme dans la recherche d’interactions éventuelles entre touristes et ongulés sauvages.
Article
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1. Recent advances in animal ecology have enabled identification of certain mechanisms that lead to the emergence of territories and home ranges from movements considered as unbounded. Among them, memory and familiarity have been identified as key parameters in cognitive maps driving animal navigation, but have been only recently used in empirical...
Article
The canalization hypothesis postulates that the rate at which trait variation generates variation in the average individual fitness in a population determines how buffered traits are against environmental and genetic factors. The ranking of a species on the slow-fast continuum - the covariation among life-history traits describing species-specific...
Article
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De nombreux massifs montagneux abritent aujourd'hui plusieurs espèces de grands herbivores sauvages. Cette cohabitation se traduit par une pression importante sur les milieux forestiers. Les résultats d'une étude du régime alimentaire du cerf, du chevreuil, du chamois et du mouflon, réalisée dans les Bauges entre 2003 et 2008, mettent en évidence d...
Article
Gender-related inequalities in scientific careers are widespread, evidenced by the attrition of women along the different stages of the promotion ladder. We studied the interwoven personal and professional trajectories of researchers in ecology and compared these trajectories between France and Norway. Given their differing welfare state policies a...
Article
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1.In the context of global change, an increasing challenge is to understand the interaction between weather variables and life histories. Species-specific life histories should condition the way climate influences population dynamics, particularly those that are associated with environmental constraints, such as lifestyles like hibernation and soci...
Article
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What Points of View on Shared Spaces between Humans and Wild Animals? This article deals with the ways observation methodology is developed to study spaces of human-animal interaction. With the financial support of Zone Atelier Alpes, a member of Lter France, for several years researchers have been studying inside the Bauges National Game Reserve...
Article
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Animals move to interact with the environment in order to find food resources and cover. Intrinsic characteristics affecting feeding and antipredatory strategies likely shape variation in movement patterns and home range formation between individuals, populations and species. Browsing herbivores selectively forage on patchily distributed resources...
Article
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This article deals with the construction of an interdisciplinary research program about interrelationship between outdoor activities and wildlife in the Bauges mountains (Alpes). This research program is build on a twofold partnership : a partnership between researchers and local stakeholders, and a partnership between researchers coming from diffe...
Article
1.In seasonal environments, birth dates are a central component for a species' life history, with potential long-term fitness consequences. Yet our understanding of selective pressures of environmental changes on birth dates is limited in wild mammals due to the difficulty of data collection. In a context of rapid climate change, the question of a...
Article
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In many species, population dynamics are shaped by age-structured demographic parameters, such as survival, which can cause age-specific sensitivity to environmental conditions. Accordingly, we can expect populations with different age-specific survival to be differently affected by environmental variation. However, this hypothesis is rarely tested...
Data
Full-text available
Supplementary files from the article "Age-specific survival and annual variation in survival of female chamois differ between populations"
Article
The "niche variation hypothesis" (NVH) predicts that populations with wider niches should display higher among-individual variability. This prediction originally stated at the intra-specific level may be extended to the inter-specific level: individuals of generalist species may differ to a greater extent than individuals of a specialist species. W...
Article
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The European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) responds to environmental conditions that vary in time and space across its distributional range, generating many different space use patterns. To test the expectation that variation in movement patterns should track changes in environmental conditions, we used the net squared displacement metric to ident...
Article
The balance between food and perceived predation risk has been revealed as one of the primary drivers of animal habitat selection. However, few studies have investigated how spatiotemporal scales and movement/activity patterns shape responses to this food/cover trade-off while accounting for individual characteristics (e.g. sex) and for variation i...
Article
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Life-history theory predicts trade-offs in energy allocation between different life-history traits when resources are limited, i.e. certain traits should be negatively correlated. However, individuals differ in their ability to acquire resources, which can lead to positive correlations between traits at the population level. Here, we investigated t...
Data
Full-text available
Supplementary materials for article "Is there a trade-off between horn growth and survival in adult female chamois?"
Article
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Studies on habitat–performance relationships that require joint data on fitness and habitat use are still scarce in long-lived species. Using data from a southern French population of Mediterranean mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon × Ovis sp.), we proposed an original approach for gaining information on this relationship by combining a fitness proxy (i...
Article
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In the context of global warming, investigating how animals buffer against the hottest conditions is a crucial issue. We focused on habitat selection in a French Mediterranean mouflon population during 2010–2012 summers. Using locations and temperatures recorded on GPS-collared individuals, we assessed thermal cover provided by different habitats a...
Article
Temporal partitioning of daily activities between species may promote coexistence within animal communities by reducing behavioural interference, particularly when species highly overlap in the use of space and resources. Such a strategy may be used by Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra rupicapra) when in the presence of mouflon (Ovis gmelini musi...
Article
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Species diversity in large herbivore communities is often explained by niche segregation allowed by differences in body mass and digestive morphophysiological features. Based on large number of gut samples in fall and winter, we analysed the temporal dynamics of diet composition, quality and interspecific overlap of 4 coexisting mountain herbivores...
Article
1. We reviewed data on the diets of mouflon (Mediterranean island populations Ovis gmelini musimon and introduced hybridized populations Ovis gmelini musimon ¥ Ovis sp.) from 33 field studies (comprising 51 independent data points suitable for analysis) to detect general patterns in the botanical composition of the diet and identify ecological fact...
Article
Large horns or antlers require a high energy allocation to produce and carry both physiological and social reproductive costs. Following the principle of energy allocation that implies trade-offs among fitness components, growing large weapons early in life should thus reduce future growth and survival. Evidence for such costs is ambiguous, however...
Article
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No-take reserves are sometimes implemented for sustainable population harvesting because they offer opportunities for animals to spatially avoid harvesters, whereas harvesters can benefit in return from the reserve spillover. Here, we used the framework of predator-prey spatial games to understand how protected areas shape spatial interactions betw...
Article
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It is a challenge to find effective methods to estimate biomass over a large range of biomass values in diverse plant communities, such as typically found in mountain grasslands. We compared the performance of three non-destructive methods for estimating plant biomass (3D quadrat: a point quadrat method, plate meter: a measure of physical volume, a...
Article
QuestionResources quality and quantity are both important determinants of habitat use for large herbivores. We aim to understand how these two variables vary throughout the growing season in sub-alpine grasslands. How do productivity and phenology (quality) of different plant communities within a landscape vary over time? Do productivity and phenol...
Article
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Alpine ecosystems will be greatly impacted by climatic change, but other factors, such as land use and invasive species, are likely to play an important role too. Climate can influence ecosystems at several levels. We describe some of them, stressing methodological approaches and available data. Climate can modify species phenology, such as floweri...
Article
Full-text available
Alpine ecosystems will be greatly impacted by climatic change, but other factors, such as land use and invasive species, are likely to play an important role too. Climate can influence ecosystems at several levels. We describe some of them, stressing methodological approaches and available data. Climate can modify species phenology, such as floweri...
Article
Full-text available
For species living in seasonal environments the understanding of demographic processes requires identifying the environmental factors during spring and summer that shape phenotypic variation. We assessed the effects of plant phenology and population abundance during spring—summer on variation in autumn body mass among cohorts (1995—2006) of juvenil...
Article
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In polygynous ungulates, the reproductive effort of adult males peaks during a short period in which feeding activities are sacrificed for mating activities. Hence, both fat reserves and body mass are predicted to decline markedly during this period. The decline is also predicted to be greater in fat reserves than in body mass because fat is catabo...
Article
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One of the main objectives of community ecology is to understand the conditions allowing species to coexist, which requires identifying how co-occurring species use and share space and resources. Species of the same trophic level, such as large herbivores, are of fundamental interest in that context because competition for resources is likely. Segr...
Article
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Characterizing the diet of large herbivores and the determinants of its variation remains a difficult task in wild species. DNA-based techniques have the potential to complement traditional time-consuming methods based on the microhistology of plant cuticle fragments in fecal or rumen samples. Recently, it has been shown that a short chloroplast DN...