Anne-Kathrin Kreft

Anne-Kathrin Kreft
University of Oslo · Department of Political Science

PhD Political Science
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Oslo

About

19
Publications
7,796
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Citations
Introduction
Postdoctoral researcher in Political Science, University of Oslo. Interested in armed conflict, sexual and gender-based violence, political violence, civil society, UNSCR 1325 and WPS agenda, women's rights. Statistical analysis, interviews and qualitative analysis, survey experiments, fieldwork. Full texts available on request.
Education
August 2015 - March 2019
University of Gothenburg
Field of study
  • Political Science

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Gender scholars show that women in situations of civil war have an impressive record of agency in the social and political spheres. Civilian women’s political mobilization during conflict includes active involvement in civil society organizations, such as nongovernmental organizations or social movements, and public articulation of grievances – in...
Article
In international policy circles, conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) is commonly viewed as a weapon of war, a framing that researchers have criticized as overly simplistic. Feminist scholars in particular caution that the ‘weapon of war’ framing decontextualizes sexual violence in conflict from the structural factors of gender inequality that u...
Preprint
Full-text available
What is field research? Is it just for qualitative scholars? Must it be done in a foreign country? How much time in the field is “enough”? A lack of disciplinary consensus on what constitutes “field research” or “fieldwork” has left graduate students in political science underinformed and thus underequipped to leverage site-intensive research to ad...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we nuance the relationships between political agency, victimhood and gender during armed conflicts. Dominant narratives often spotlight individuals as either passive victims or as active agents. These representations are especially pronounced for sexual violence against women in conflict, where gendered conceptions of victimhood an...
Article
Full-text available
Prior research has established that conflict-related sexual violence against women is anchored in patriarchal norms and practices that assert gendered hierarchies. What remains relatively underresearched, however, is how patriarchal structures shape individual, social, and institutional responses to conflict-related sexual violence and its victims....
Article
Full-text available
Researching sensitive topics often carries immediate effects on researchers, yet discussions about the emotional and psychological impacts of conducting this type of research remain rare. In recent years, debates begun to emerge about the emotional and psychological toll that qualitative field-based research on violence in general, and on gender-ba...
Article
Full-text available
Existing scholarship points to gender patterns in diplomacy. This study examines such gender patterns in new ways, expecting women to be less likely to be ambassadors in states with more economic clout and in conflict-affected states, but more likely to serve as ambassadors in more gender-equal states. Most importantly, we examine whether these gen...
Article
Full-text available
What is field research? Is it just for qualitative scholars? Must it be done in a foreign country? How much time in the field is “enough”? A lack of disciplinary consensus on what constitutes “field research” or “fieldwork” has left graduate students in political science underinformed and thus underequipped to leverage site-intensive research to ad...
Article
Full-text available
March 2019. It was a brisk spring day in Toronto. We were having lunch in the crowded food court opposite the conference hotel. This was the first time that we had sat down and openly spoken about the toll that researching conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) in the context of our PhD education has taken on our mental well-being. We both felt gr...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 crisis has fundamentally gendered effects, on intimate partner violence, the division of care labour, healthcare and more. This, and other COVID-19-related changes, may have important consequences for the gendered practice of diplomacy. This essay therefore discusses COVID-19 to highlight the need to pay better attention to gender in t...
Research
Full-text available
How do women mobilize against conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV)? How do such women activists understand the nature and causes of this violence, and what can we learn from these insights? This policy brief explores patterns of women’s civil society mobilization around CRSV in Colombia, looking particularly at these women’s perceptions of CRSV....
Research
Full-text available
¿Cómo se movilizan las mujeres contra la violencia sexual relacionada con los conflictos (VSRC)? ¿Cómo dichas mujeres comprenden la naturaleza y causas de esta violencia y qué podemos aprender de estas reflexiones? Este informe estudia los patrones de movilización de las mujeres en respuesta a la VSRC en Colombia y presta especial atención a las pe...
Article
Full-text available
Síntesis: Los académicos y estudiosos de cuestiones de género han demostrado que las mujeres en situaciones de conflicto bélico tienen un historial impresionante de actuación en los ámbitos social y político. Las explicaciones existentes sobre la movilización de las mujeres civiles durante un conflicto enfatizan el papel de los desequilibrios demog...
Article
Sexual violence (SV) in conflict is increasingly politicized at both the international and domestic levels. Where SV in conflict is prevalent, we argue international actors perceive gender to be salient and push for a gendered response. Simultaneously, women mobilize politically in response to the threat to their security that conflict-related SV c...
Chapter
Full-text available
Introductory chapter to the dissertation. Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/59909
Preprint
International policy discourse upholds the idea that conflict-related sexual violence is a weapon of war, forming part of armed actors’ explicit war strategy. Scholars have taken a critical stance, arguing that this violence is multi-faceted and can take different forms in different contexts. In addition, critical feminist scholars emphasize, decon...
Article
While dictatorships perform worse than democracies in respect for most human rights, a large number of autocracies have prioritized the advancement of women’s rights. We present a theory of authoritarian rights provision that focuses on the incentives for dictatorships to secure women’s loyalty, and we identify the particular capacity of institutio...
Chapter
This chapter surveys scholarship on the empowerment of women in diplomacy, a high-prestige arena that has been resistant to the entry of women. Diplomatic history shows that women occasionally occupied formal diplomatic roles prior to the nineteenth century. More commonly, their influence was informal. By the late nineteenth century, women were no...
Article
In response to women’s frequent marginalization in conflict settings, the United Nations Security Council passed resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security in 2000. It called for including a gender perspective into peacekeeping operations and for enhancing women’s participation in all aspects of post-conflict reconstruction. This article contribu...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I would like to carry out a survey in Colombia, ideally representative but I realize I'll probably have to depart from that ideal. My budget is limited, so it would have to be an online survey. Is anyone aware of any platforms to recruit participants to (academic) surveys in Colombia, à la MTurk, Prolific etc.? Any other ideas?

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This set of papers elaborates on effective teaching and research practices, and their applications.
Archived project
Sexual violence is a highly gendered violence. It disproportionately – albeit not exclusively – affects women and girls, and it asserts gendered hierarchies between perpetrators and victims. The widespread rape of women has been reported e.g. in World Wars I and II and in many wars in medieval Europe, but only since the 1990s has sexual violence in conflict moved onto national and international policy agendas. Sexual violence is now globally recognized as a weapon of war and increasingly condemned and confronted by domestic actors. What are the implications of the politicization of conflict-related sexual violence, as a highly gendered violence, for women’s agency in conflict settings? This is the overarching question this dissertation addresses, using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. Paper 1 shows that women mobilize in response to the collective threat that conflict-related sexual violence constitutes to them as women. Qualitative interviews with representatives of women’s organizations and victims’ associations in Colombia reveal, in paper 2, that patriarchal structures and societally entrenched gender inequality are at the heart of mobilized women’s understanding of this violence. An examination of United Nations peace operation mandates in paper 3 reveals that gender content, including a commitment to women’s participation, is higher when sexual violence is widespread in the respective conflict. Paper 4 shows that countries experiencing a conflict with prevalent sexual violence adopt legislative gender quotas sooner and at higher levels than other countries. Jointly, the results indicate that conflict-related sexual violence makes gender salient in both domestic and international arenas, as a result of which women’s agency may be amplified. While women’s civil society mobilization in response to conflict-related sexual violence broadens out to incorporate a more comprehensive and holistic perspective of gender inequalities in society, the international response signifies a narrowing in of the global Women, Peace and Security framework on the singular issue of conflict-related sexual violence. The results are encouraging in that they reveal the previously overlooked nexus between women’s victimization in sexual violence and women’s political agency, but they also expose the long road yet ahead for gender equality norms.