Anne Hudson Jones

Anne Hudson Jones
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston | UTMB · Institute for the Medical Humanities

PhD

About

61
Publications
5,305
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903
Citations
Citations since 2016
5 Research Items
259 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Introduction

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Amidst the recent bicentennial celebrations of the first publication, in 1818, of Mary Godwin Shelley's novel Frankenstein, little attention was given to the character Henry Clerval. Yet despite his few pages in the novel, Clerval's role as a humanist foil for Victor Frankenstein is significant. This brief coda examines what contemporary readers mi...
Chapter
This chapter looks back at some of the earliest attempts by the first generation of literature-and-medicine scholars to answer the question: Why teach literature and medicine? Reviewing the development of the field in its early years, the author examines statements by practitioners to see whether their answers have held up over time and to consider...
Article
By 1999, when Atul Gawande's essay "Whose Body Is It, Anyway?" appeared in The New Yorker, patient autonomy had largely trumped physician paternalism in American medical practice. Gawande uses the stories of actual patients to attempt his counter case for physicians' "talking patients through their decisions." Toward the end of his essay, Gawande a...
Article
In this essay, I look back at some of the earliest attempts by the first generation of literature-and-medicine scholars to answer the question: Why teach literature and medicine? Reviewing the development of the field in its early years, I examine statements by practitioners to see whether their answers have held up over time and to consider how th...
Article
Tillie Lerner Olsen was the second of six children born to Samuel and Ida Lerner, Russian Jewish immigrants to the United States. Born on a tenant farm in Nebraska, she was a worthy heir of her parent’s revolutionary heritage. In 1929, she left high school after the eleventh grade to begin working at a variety of low-paying jobs—hotel maid, packing...
Article
Using a Delphi Consultation process, a group of medical writers established by the European Medical Writers Association (EMWA) set out to determine the current thinking on the problems of ghostwriting in medical publications and what should be done about them. In this context, ghostwriting is where a professional medical writer prepares a manuscrip...
Article
The Institute for the Medical Humanities of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) was established in June 1973 to ensure that humanities teaching and research became an integral part of the education of future scientists and health-care professionals at UTMB. The multidisciplinary faculty of the Institute-who currently represen...
Article
The purpose of this article is to encourage and help inform active discussion of authorship policies among members of scientific societies. The article explains the history and rationale of the influential criteria for authorship developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, examines questions about those criteria that emerge...
Article
Literature and Medicine 20.1 (2001) 6 At the annual meeting of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities in Salt Lake City last October, several editorial board members of Literature and Medicine attended the panel session titled "Elucidating Gods and Monsters: Using Literary and Religious Narratives to Frame Moral Conversation about the Ne...
Article
Full-text available
Narrative contributes to medical ethics through the content of stories (what they say) and through the analysis of their form (how they are told and why it matters). The study of fictional and factual stories can be an important aid to understanding in medical ethics. The techniques of literary criticism can be applied to the analysis of ethical te...
Article
Bulletin of the History of Medicine 73.4 (1999) 713-714 The title and topic of Bedside Seductions, as well as its publication by a trade rather than a university press, are likely to attract a wide, general audience. Yet Catherine Judd's statement of the book's central project--"to set in motion the hitherto inert and typologizing classifications o...
Article
1that she complains about her illness having been trivialised because depression is so common. Such a complaint would have been unthinkable a generation ago, and it may still be unthinkable to many who suffer from mental illness today. Wurtzel claims, however, that her experience is typical of members of her generation, 1 Generation X (the post-bab...
Article
Arguably the greatest novel ever written about aging, Gabriel Garcia-Márquez’ Love in the Time of Cholera (2) may be a challenging text for those who need to read it most: the young, the would-be rational, and the impatient. To say that many health care professionals fall into these categories is not to fault them but merely to describe them. Who b...
Article
During the past fifteen years, the relationship between literature and medical ethics has evolved from the occasional use of stories as a substitute for the traditional case study in medical ethics to the emergence of a narrative approach to ethical analysis and decision making. Thus far, literary theory has been more important to narrative medical...
Article
Full-text available
Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful...
Article
Anne Hudson Jones is Professor of Literature and Medicine in the Institute for the Medical Humanities of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. She is the editor of Images of Healers, volume 2 of Literature and Medicine, and of Images of Nurses: Perspectives from History, Art, and Literature.
Article
Anne Hudson Jones is Associate Professor of Literature and Medicine at the Institute for the Medical Humanities of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. She is editor of the recent book Images of Nurses: Perspectives from History, Art, and Literature (1988).
Article
Anne Hudson Jones is Associate Professor of Literature and Medicine at the Institute for the Medical Humanities of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Her essays on literature and medicine have appeared in Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, Theoretical Medicine, and the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy. 1. M. H. Abrams, in The...
Article
We consider the moral and social ingredients in physicians' relationships with patients of diminished capacity by considering certain claims made about friendship and the physician's role. To assess these claims we look at the life context of two patients as elaborated examples provided in two novels: Woman on the Edge of Time (1976) by Marge Pierc...
Article
When it comes to gin and beer, One could spend a busy year Reading all that has been said about their power; But if you want some sense About molecular events, I can tell you all that's known in half an hour.
Article
Anne Hudson Jones is Associate Professor of Literature and Medicine at the Institute for the Medical Humanities of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. Her latest essays on literature and medicine appeared in Perspectives in Biology and Medicine and Theoretical Medicine. Her book Medicine and the Physician in Popular Culture will be...

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