Anne Guerry

Anne Guerry
Stanford University | SU · Woods Institute for the Environment

PhD

About

81
Publications
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7,173
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Publications

Publications (81)
Article
As marine spatial planning (MSP) continues to gain global prominence as an approach to ocean governance, planners and other stakeholders are eager to evaluate its social and ecological outcomes and to better understand whether plans are achieving their intended results in an equitable and cost-efficient manner. While a plan’s outcomes for marine en...
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Globally, rising seas threaten massive numbers of people and significant infrastructure. Adaptation strategies increasingly incorporate nature-based solutions. New science can illuminate where these solutions are appropriate in urban environments and what benefits they provide to people. Together with stakeholders in San Mateo County, California, U...
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Coastal communities rely on levees and seawalls as critical protection against sea-level rise; in the United States alone, $300 billion in shoreline armoring costs are forecast by 2100. However, despite the local flood risk reduction benefits, these structures can exacerbate flooding and associated damages along other parts of the shoreline—particu...
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Globally, cities face massive environmental and societal challenges such as rapid population growth and climate change. In response, natural infrastructure is increasingly recognized for its potential to enhance resilience and improve human well-being. Here, we examine the role of the ecosystem services and resilience approaches in urban planning,...
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Natural infrastructure such as parks, forests, street trees, green roofs, and coastal vegetation is central to sustainable urban management. Despite recent progress, it remains challenging for urban decision-makers to incorporate the benefits of natural infrastructure into urban design and planning. Here, we present an approach to support the green...
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Nature underpins human well-being in critical ways, especially in health. Nature provides pollination of nutritious crops, purification of drinking water, protection from floods, and climate security, among other well-studied health benefits. A crucial, yet challenging, research frontier is clarifying how nature promotes physical activity for its m...
Article
The magnitude and pace of global change demand rapid assessment of nature and its contributions to people. We present a fine-scale global modeling of current status and future scenarios for several contributions: water quality regulation, coastal risk reduction, and crop pollination. We find that where people's needs for nature are now greatest, na...
Article
Urban nature has the potential to improve air and water quality, mitigate flooding, enhance physical and mental health, and promote social and cultural well-being. However, the value of urban ecosystem services remains highly uncertain, especially across the diverse social, ecological and technological contexts represented in cities around the worl...
Chapter
Growth in human population and economic activity has dramatically transformed our planet since the Industrial Revolution. While driving significant improvements in human well-being, these forms of growth also deeply eroded the natural capital embodied in Earth’s lands, waters, and biodiversity. Rapid economic development has lifted hundreds of mill...
Preprint
Coastal habitats provide important benefits to people, including habitat for species targeted by fisheries and opportunities for tourism and recreation. Yet, such human activities also can imperil these habitats and undermine the ecosystem services they provide to people. Cumulative risk assessment provides an analytical framework for synthesizing...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal habitats provide important benefits to people, including habitat for species targeted by fisheries and opportunities for tourism and recreation. Yet, such human activities also can imperil these habitats and undermine the ecosystem services they provide to people. Cumulative risk assessment provides an analytical framework for synthesizing...
Data
Supporting information for methodology. Additional explanation and details for the methods and data used in this study including estimating risk, habitat data, human activities and stressor data, and the wind energy analysis. Table A, Exposure and consequence criteria used in the Habitat Risk Assessment model; Fig A, Habitat types; Table B, Habitat...
Article
Community dynamics are often influenced by processes operating at large spatial scales. For example, the structure and dynamics of rocky intertidal communities depend not only on local factors, but also on the nearshore oceanic processes that affect the delivery of nutrients, propagules, and food particles. Conceptual models such as the grazer-reve...
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Interest in the role that ecosystems play in reducing the impacts of coastal hazards has grown dramatically. Yet the magnitude and nature of their effects are highly context dependent, making it difficult to know under what conditions coastal habitats, such as saltmarshes, reefs, and forests, are likely to be effective for saving lives and protecti...
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Coastal protection of communities and property using “green infrastructure” approaches is gaining popularity as the science and practice improve. Guidance is limited for decision makers interested in taking action to protect shorelines. Here, we offer practical guidance for decision makers interested in moving beyond generalities for coastal protec...
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Businesses may be missing opportunities to account for ecosystem services in their decisions because they do not have methods to quantify and value ecosystem services. We developed a method to quantify and value coastal protection and other ecosystem services in the context of a cost-benefit analysis of hurricane risk mitigation options for a busin...
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Concern about the visibility of large infrastructure development often drives public opposition to these projects. However, insufficient analytical tools to assess visibility across a large number of alternate sites prior to siting typically results in the omission of visibility in multi-criteria siting processes, leading to inferior site selection...
Article
The growing base of information about ecosystemservices generated by ecologists, economists, and other scientists could improve the implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of commodity-sourcing standards being adopted by corporations to mitigate risk in their supply chains and achieve sustainability goals. This review examines various ways that...
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Pursuit of multiple avenues can speed incorporating the value of natural capital and ecosystem services into operations of individuals and institutions, such as businesses, government, development banks, nongovernmental institutions, and households. As Phelps et al. (1) rightly point out, the PNAS Special Feature (2) and much of the existing litera...
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While there have been rapid advances in assessments of biodiversity and ecosystem services (BES), a critical remaining challenge is how to move from scientific knowledge to real-world decision making. We offer 6 lessons from our experiences applying new approaches and tools for quantifying BES in 20 pilot demonstrations: (1) Applying a BES approach...
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The central challenge of the 21st century is to develop economic, social, and governance systems capable of ending poverty and achieving sustainable levels of population and consumption while securing the life-support systems underpinning current and future human well-being. Essential to meeting this challenge is the incorporation of natural capita...
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Recent calls for ocean planning envision informed management of social and ecological systems to sustain delivery of ecosystem services to people. However, until now, no coastal and marine planning process has applied an ecosystem-services framework to understand how human activities affect the flow of benefits, to create scenarios, and to design a...
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This is the accepted manuscript of a paper that will be published in PNAS. It is currently under an infinite embargo.
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The central challenge of the 21st century is to develop economic, social, and governance systems capable of ending poverty and achieving sustainable levels of population and consumption while securing the life-support systems underpinning current and future human well-being. Essential to meeting this challenge is the incorporation of natural capita...
Article
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An age-old conflict around a seemingly simple question has resurfaced: why do we conserve nature? Contention around this issue has come and gone many times, but in the past several years we believe that it has reappeared as an increasingly acrimonious debate between, in essence, those who argue that nature should be protected for its own sake (intr...
Article
Vegetation can protect communities by reducing nearshore wave height and altering sediment transport processes. However, quantitative approaches for evaluating the coastal protection services, or benefits, supplied by vegetation to people in a wide range of coastal environments are lacking. To begin to fill this knowledge gap, an integrated modelin...
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Ecosystem services, fundamental to livelihoods and well-being, are reshaping environmental management and policy. However, the behavioral dimensions of ecosystem services and the responses of ordinary people to the management of those services, is less well understood. The ecosystem services framework lends itself to understanding the relationship...
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Many diagnoses of declining marine species and habitats along US coasts point to upland and freshwater sources of imperilment. Yet, little work has examined how and whether activities on land affect marine resources. Similarly, the impacts of climate change on coastal systems are among the most certain; yet, few studies have explored how alternativ...
Chapter
Ecosystem services are essential to sustaining and fulfilling human life, and yet their supply is seriously threatened by the intensification of human impacts on the environment. Over the past decade, efforts to value and protect ecosystem services have been promoted by many as the last best hope for making conservation mainstream – attractive and...
Chapter
Humans benefit from marine systems in diverse ways. Advances in assessing these “ecosystem services” have raised awareness of our dependence on them and their threatened status. We discuss the importance of modeling ecosystem services to inform decisions, place these efforts in the context of coupled social–ecological systems, and highlight unique...
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Scientists have traditionally studied recreation in nature by conducting surveys at entrances to major attractions such as national parks. This method is expensive and provides limited spatial and temporal coverage. A new source of information is available from online social media websites such as flickr. Here, we test whether this source of "big d...
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Ecosystems provide many of the material building blocks for human well-being. Although quantification and appreciation of such contributions have rapidly grown, our dependence upon cultural connections to nature deserves more attention. We synthesize multidisciplinary peer-reviewed research on contributions of nature or ecosystems to human well-bei...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Quantifying ecosystem services is often promoted as a way to measure progress towards ecosystem based management goals. In a unique partnership between academics, NGO’s, and a public-private management body, we have put this concept to work on the West Coast of Vancouver Island. After extensive stakeholder engagement t...
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Extreme weather, sea-level rise and degraded coastal ecosystems are placing people and property at greater risk of damage from coastal hazards. The likelihood and magnitude of losses may be reduced by intact reefs and coastal vegetation, especially when those habitats fringe vulnerable communities and infrastructure. Using five sea-level-rise scena...
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Carey, M. P., Levin, P. S., Townsend, H., Minello, T. J., Sutton, G. R., Francis, T., Harvey, C. J., Toft, J. E., Arkema, K. K., Burke, J. L., Kim, C-K., Guerry, A., Plummer, M., Spiridonov, G., and Ruckelshaus, M. Characterizing coastal foodwebs with qualitative links to bridge the gap between the theory and the practice of ecosystem-based managem...
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Eelgrass beds provide valuable refuge, foraging, and spawning habitat for many marine species, including valued species such as Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi), and Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister). We used dynamic simulations in a food web model of central Puget Sound, Washington, USA developed in the Eco...
Article
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The ecosystem services concept is used to make explicit the diverse benefits ecosystems provide to people, with the goal of improving assessment and, ultimately, decision-making. Alongside material benefits such as natural resources (e.g., clean water, timber), this concept includes-through the 'cultural' category of ecosystem services-diverse non-...
Conference Paper
Dr. Guerry will provide an overview of the Natural Capital Project and partners use of ecosystem service approaches and tools to inform decisions in diverse contexts worldwide. She will highlight a range of successful outcomes including: stakeholders and decision-makers are newly aware of natures benefits and the connections among them, stakeholder...
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Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance t...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Coastal habitats are important local public goods because they provide natural hazard mitigation services to various members of coastal communities, among other services. Despite increasing evidence of the value of these services, coastal habitats continue to be degraded. Three major factors that may be causing underin...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Focusing on ecosystem services (ES) is seen as a means of improving decision-making. Research to date has emphasized valuation of material contributions of ecosystems to human well-being (through e.g., clean water, agricultural crops, reduced flood risk). Much less attention has been paid to characterizing how importan...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Happiness is complex. The notion of happiness as an ultimate good, and the question of what makes people happy have occupied much thought throughout our intellectual history. Recently the academic literature on subjective well-being has blossomed, with many robust links being identified between various forms of financi...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Our oceans are peopled, and have been for thousands of years. Climate change and other human stressors are altering the ecosystems that have long supported livelihoods in coastal communities, yet our understanding of the ecology and management of coastal ecosystems still does not integrate human wellbeing, ecology and...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Since the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, efforts to value and protect ecosystem services have been seen by many as the best hope for making conservation attractive and commonplace worldwide. If people and institutions recognize the diverse values of Nature, then we can greatly enhance investments in conservation and...
Article
Full-text available
A focus on ecosystem services (ES) is seen as a means for improving decisionmaking. In the research to date, the valuation of the material contributions of ecosystems to human well-being has been emphasized, with less attention to important cultural ES and nonmaterial values. This gap persists because there is no commonly accepted framework for eli...
Article
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People around the world are looking to marine ecosystems to provide additional benefits to society. As they consider expanding current uses and investing in new ones, new management approaches are needed that will sustain the delivery of the diverse benefits that people want and need. An ecosystem services framework provides metrics for assessing t...
Article
Humans obtain numerous benefits from marine ecosystems, including fish to eat; mitigation of storm damage; nutrient and water cycling and primary production; and cultural, aesthetic and recreational values. However, managing these benefits, or ecosystem services, in the marine world relies on an integrated approach that accounts for both marine and...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The rugged west coast of Vancouver Island British Columbia, Canada boasts plentiful populations of fish and shellfish, pristine beaches for surfing, kayaking, and diving, and large ocean waves that can be harnessed for renewable energy. Some stakeholders are eager to expand coastal development to support tourism, renew...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Faced with the challenges of increased human use of coastal areas, ecologists, engineers and economists have been developing new ways to account for the protective services from coastal hazards provided by marine ecosystems. The Coastal Protection model of Marine InVEST quantifies and values the ability of biogenic habitats to provide coastal commu...
Conference Paper
The great promise of marine spatial planning cannot be realized without tangible tools for implementation. She will introduce Marine InVEST, a new decision-support tool for modeling, mapping, and valuing ecosystem services provided by coasts and oceans. She will focus on how an ecosystem services approach informs real-world planning by elucidating...